<p>Uma Thurman in &quot;Pulp Fiction.&quot;</p>

Uma Thurman in "Pulp Fiction."

Credit: Miramax Films

Haneke's 'Amour' joins exclusive club of Palme d'Or winners turned Best Picture nominees

The film joins 15 others to have transitioned from the Croisette to Oscar

As well as being gratifying in and of itself, Thursday's Best Picture Oscar nomination for Michael Haneke's "Amour" is immensely pleasing to Oscar stat geeks, who can count up the many ways in which it breaks form in the top category: the first foreign-language nominee since 2006's "Letters from Iwo Jima," the first non-US foreign-language nominee since 2000's "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon," the first French-language nominee since 1969's "Z," only the ninth foreign-language nominee overall, etc, etc.

But the stat we've picked up on today relates back to the start of its awards journey, where it won arguably the loftiest film award of all: the Palme d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival. It scarcely needs to be stated that Cannes and the Oscars occupy very different worlds, so their respective favorites rarely overlap -- but "Amour" now becomes only the 16th Palme d'Or winner to convert that prestige into a Best Picture nomination. (Okay, not strictly, given that a few films on the list actually went to Cannes after Oscar night, but the overlap is the point.)

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<p>Emmanuelle Riva, Michael Haneke (center)&nbsp;and Jean-Louis Trintignant on the set of &quot;Amour&quot;</p>

Emmanuelle Riva, Michael Haneke (center) and Jean-Louis Trintignant on the set of "Amour"

Credit: Sony Classics

Nine double-dipping Oscar nominees have multiple shots on goal this year

And George Clooney broke a record, by the way

Another year, another set of Oscar nominees. And while all are lucky to be in the mix, some are twice as lucky. There are always a few double dippers each year, individuals recognized in multiple categories or, sometimes, twice in the same category. So who's in the club this time around?

Let's start with "Amour" director Michael Haneke, because you could actually make a case for him being a triple nominee this year. He was recognized individually in the Best Director and Best Original Screenplay categories, but he will also be the one to accept the Oscar for Best Foreign Language Film should "Amour" wind up victorious there. Alas, the nomination "officially" goes to the film's country of origin, Austria in this case, but the fact is Haneke is in a position to walk away with three trophies next month. No one else can say that this year.

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Oscar Talk: Ep. 102 -- Oscar nominations and the BFCA Critics' Choice Movie Awards

Oscar Talk: Ep. 102 -- Oscar nominations and the BFCA Critics' Choice Movie Awards

First blush predicts on what will win as well

Welcome to Oscar Talk.

In case you're new to the site and/or the podcast, Oscar Talk is a weekly kudocast, your one-stop awards chat shop between yours truly and Anne Thompson of Thompson on Hollywood. The podcast is weekly, every Friday throughout the season, charting the ups and downs of contenders along the way. Plenty of things change en route to Oscar's stage and we're here to address it all as it unfolds.

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<p>Mark&nbsp;Wahlberg in &quot;Ted&quot;</p>

Mark Wahlberg in "Ted"

Credit: Universal Pictures

'Skyfall,' 'Best Exotic,' 'Ted' join the usual in ACE Eddie nominations

All but 'Django Unchained' and 'The Master' accounted for

The American Cinema Editors (ACE) decided there was no rush and chose to hold its announcement for nominations honoring excellence in filmmaking until after the Oscar nominations landed. This despite being ready to announce on Tuesday. I applaud them for that. Just because the Academy says "jump" doesn't mean you have to.

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<p>&quot;Lincoln&quot;</p>

"Lincoln"

Credit: Touchstone Pictures

Roundup: The thinking man's Oscar crop?

Also: Ebert weighs in, and what to expect when you're expecting Seth MacFarlane

The Oscarweb today is mainly awash with responses to yesterday's Academy Award nominations, and little news besides, so let's lead with the most articulate of them. A.O. Scott, for one, is pretty thrilled with the list, seeing this year's Oscar class as an encouraging indication that there's still a place in the industry for entertaining, stimulating mainstream cinema for adults: "You may also notice a lot of big-studio releases without a superhero in sight. And, perhaps most remarkably, you will find movies that have already sparked passionate arguments and sold a lot of tickets. It would be hard to say the same about the last two best picture winners, 'The Artist' and 'The King’s Speech' ... What strikes me about this year’s Oscar nominees is how many of them invite, or even force, their viewers to think, and making thinking part of the pleasure they offer." Do you think this year's lineup represents an improvement on recent years?  [New York Times]

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<p>Tony&nbsp;Kushner reads his acceptance speech for writing &quot;Lincoln&quot;...during a commercial break.</p>

Tony Kushner reads his acceptance speech for writing "Lincoln"...during a commercial break.

Credit: HitFix

The critics choose embarrassment

A lot of bad decisions have the BFCA pointing in the wrong direction

I apologized to Broadcast Film Critics Association president Joey Berlin after this evening's Critics' Choice Movie Awards for being frank about it, but I couldn't tell a lie: this year's show was an embarrassment. Appalling, I'd go so far to say.

Why? You've got Tony Kushner on stage during a commercial break, that's why. You've got Rich Moore talking over the crowd during another one upon accepting his Best Animated Film prize, that's why. You've deteriorated into the People's Choice Awards with added air time for Jennifer Lawrence to make some more "Hunger Games" remarks and Judd Apatow padding a show that could have dealt a little more courtesy to the winners of the evening.

So if Kushner can't have air time, I'll give him a little in that snap shot to the left. It was just disgraceful, to reduce the screenplay categories to the sidelines like that. The crafts categories, added a few years back, have always been dished out on the red carpet and announced as a bumper to commercial break, but it's just wrong. I was sitting next to "Life of Pi" cinematographer Claudio Miranda. He joked that his win was the best kind because he didn't have to get up and make a speech. Nevertheless, it's a level of disrespect that I don't find in keeping with the BFCA's stated purpose.

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<p>Ben Affleck at the 18th annual Critics' Choice Movie Awards</p>

Ben Affleck at the 18th annual Critics' Choice Movie Awards

Credit: Matt Sayles/Invision/AP

'Argo' takes top honors at BFCA Critics' Choice Movie Awards

Acting wins for Day-Lewis, Chastain, Hoffman and Hathaway

It's been a day of bittersweet fortunes for "Argo." This morning, the popular political thriller's hopes of winning the Best Picture Oscar were cut down to size when Ben Affleck shockingly failed to make the Best Director lineup. Hours later, however, Affleck was the golden boy once more at the Broadcast Film Critics' Association's Critics' Choice Awards, as he won both the Best Picture and Best Director trophies --elbowing out "Lincoln," which had led the field with 13 nominations. If not for this morning's bombshell, Affleck would likely now be in the driver's seat for the Oscar. It's a weird season, this.

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<p>Suraj Sharma in &quot;Life of&nbsp;Pi&quot;</p>

Suraj Sharma in "Life of Pi"

Credit: 20th Century Fox

Tech Support: 'Life of Pi' and 'Lincoln' lead the crafts category nominations

It was very clear who dominated throughout the branches this morning

And they’re here. Another year come and another set of nominees in the Academy’s crafts categories, highlighting the invaluable contributions to our movies by behind-the-lines, "below the line" artists.

While most Oscar-watchers are still picking their jaws up off the floor after what happened in the Best Director category, several have also noticed the over-performing of “Life of Pi” and “Silver Linings Playbook.” In the case of “Pi,” that led to its leading the way among the crafts category contenders, with 8 nominations. “Lincoln” landed in second place with six nods.

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<p>Helen Hunt in &quot;The Sessions.&quot;</p>

Helen Hunt in "The Sessions."

Credit: Fox Searchlight Pictures

Academy regains its Sundance connection

After last year's meager showing, today's nods again prove the indie fest's power

Though it's long been a prime scouting-ground for future documentary nominees, the Sundance Film Festival has, in recent years, hatched a growing number of Oscar contenders in the bigger-ticket categories.

"Little Miss Sunshine," "Precious," "An Education," "The Kids Are All Right," "Winter's Bone" -- all of them bowed big at the January fest, and then managed the significant feat of sustaining buzz for an entire year before securing Oscar nominations for Best Picture. Ditto such acting and screenwriting nominees as "Frozen River," "The Savages," "The Messenger" and "Animal Kingdom." The Sundance-to-Oscar stretch is one of the longest roads in the campaigning game, and those who survive it deserve a lot of credit: as a small-scale indie, it's hard enough to get attention even with a fall debut, but counting on the length of voters' memories and the strength of word of mouth is a dicey strategy.

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<p>Quvenzhané Wallis and Benh Zeitlin, Oscar nominees for &quot;Beasts of the&nbsp;Southern Wild&quot;</p>

Quvenzhané Wallis and Benh Zeitlin, Oscar nominees for "Beasts of the Southern Wild"

Credit: Fox Searchlight Pictures

Oscar brings surprises aplenty as frontrunners miss and fairytales come true

The 85th annual nominations packed an intriguing punch

Well, then. That was a cold blast of water to the faces of Ben Affleck and Kathryn Bigelow this morning. The directors of "Argo" and "Zero Dark Thirty" respectively failed to be nominated for their films, each of which were frontrunners for a potential win in the Best Picture race leading into today's announcement and assumed nominees for their work on the CIA thrillers. But without a Best Director nod, it's generally a little tough to take the big prize, and so, the biggest shock of the day is their failure to get in.

They each yielded to perhaps the most surprising nominee of the day, Benh Zeitlin, director of "Beasts of the Southern Wild." Talk about a big, beautiful success story. Sundance is gearing up for another run in just one week and to see this film last a whole year (it debuted at Sundance 2012 where it was picked up by Fox Searchlight) and particularly see this strong a showing (Quvenzhané Wallis was also nominated in the lead actress category, the youngest actress ever to have the honor) is just lovely. Congrats to all involved.

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