<p>Helena Bonham Carter at last week's &quot;Les Mis&eacute;rables&quot; premiere in London.&nbsp;</p>

Helena Bonham Carter at last week's "Les Misérables" premiere in London. 

Credit: AP Photo/Joel Ryan

Helena Bonham Carter to be honored by the London Film Critics' Circle

The actress will receive the Dilys Powell Award for contribution to British cinema

I'm the first to admit that I don't tend to take great interest in press releases announcing the umpteenth honorary award winner of the season -- while frequently deserved and hard-earned, such honors can seem like unspecific garnish beside their tangier competitive counterparts.

Still, having now served for two years on the awards committee of the London Film Critics' Circle, I'm well aware of the extensive consultation and organization that goes into such seemingly simple awards. As we tried to decide on a recipient for next year's Dilys Powell Award -- recognizing outstanding contribution to British cinema -- a lengthy list of candidates was considered and debated over several meetings and countless emails, until one outstanding name was roundly agreed upon: Helena Bonham Carter.

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<p>Michelle Williams and Seth Rogen in &quot;Take This Waltz&quot;</p>

Michelle Williams and Seth Rogen in "Take This Waltz"

Credit: Magnolia Pictures

'Silver Linings Playbook' and 'Take This Waltz' stand out in Detroit Film Critics Society nods

'Argo' and 'The Impossible' also favorites

The Detroit Film Critics Society has announced its list of nominees, and they refreshingly go their own way in a number of areas. "Silver Linings Playbook" led the way with seven nominations and Sarah Polley's "Take This Waltz" was a favorite, too. Other unique picks include Bill Murray in the Best Actor line-up for "Hyde Park on Hudson" and Greta Gerwig in Best Actress for "Damsels in Distress." Check out the full list below and remember to keep track of the season via The Circuit.

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<p>Anna Kendrick in &quot;Pitch Perfect.&quot;</p>

Anna Kendrick in "Pitch Perfect."

Credit: Universal Pictures

Roundup: Why 2012 has been a good year for movie heroines

Also: Inside the LAFCA vote, and examining BAFTA's rule changes

I somehow missed this when it appeared a few day ago, but A.O. Scott's essay on the year in movie heroines is essential reading. While noting the commercial and/or critical success of female-powered narratives ranging from "The Hunger Games" to "Brave" to "Beasts of the Southern Wild" to "Pitch Perfect" -- while noting the potential for "Zero Dark Thirty" to rule an otherwise male-dominated Oscar slate -- he's not so naive or patronising as to label 2012 any kind of Year of the Woman. Still, he does sense a recent uptick in studios' consideration of the intelligent female audience. "It should not, after all, be a big deal that movies like 'Bridesmaids' or 'The Hunger Games' exist," he writes, "perhaps because it should have been a bigger deal when such movies didn’t." [New York Times]

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<p>Emmanuelle Riva has already won several critics' awards for &quot;Amour.&quot;</p>

Emmanuelle Riva has already won several critics' awards for "Amour."

Credit: AP Photo/Michel Euler

Emmanuelle Riva on playing part of a Michael Haneke symphony in 'Amour'

We talk to the Boston and Los Angeles critics' choice for Best Actress

The first thing Emmanuelle Riva wants me to know – before any mention of movies, careers or awards, before the word “Amour” even enters our conversation – is that she's feeling fine. 

Admittedly, it's not an entirely unprompted statement. She's merely responding to my opening greeting, in which I mention how sorry I was to hear of her recent ill health – words which immediately draw a good-natured but puzzled laugh. “I'm sorry, illness?” she asks over the phone, via a translator, from her home in Paris. “I don't know what you mean.” 

Nervous that I've kicked off an eagerly-awaited interview with an immediate faux pas, I sheepishly explain that her absence at the previous weekend's European Film Awards in Malta – where she was a popular winner of the Best Actress prize – had been explained by the presenter as the result of flu season. Happily, Riva cheerfully confirms, there must have been a misunderstanding. “I'm perfectly fine,” she says. “I was just tired. I've been doing interviews since Cannes!” 

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<p>Amy Adams will be honored at the Santa Barbara International Film Festival next month.</p>

Amy Adams will be honored at the Santa Barbara International Film Festival next month.

Credit: Kenneth Wilardt

Amy Adams to receive Vanguard Award at Santa Barbara fest

The actress is aiming for her fourth Oscar nod this season

Though the category remains highly flexible, Amy Adams's position in the Best Supporting Actress race had been looking the tiniest bit precarious until recently. Though critically beloved, "The Master" is clearly not a consensus favorite, while her excellent work in it risks getting sidelined -- not just because of her more prominently featured male co-stars, but because the chilly tenor of her performance as a slyly controlling kewpie-doll wife doesn't invite the same emotional response as some of her chief rivals.

Things are looking up, though. A win from the Los Angeles critics, who came through for "The Master" in a big way, is a major boost, and today it was announced that Adams will receive the Cinema Vanguard Award at next month's Santa Barbara International Film Festival -- which, like Palm Springs, is a useful stop on the Oscar campaign trail.

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<p>&quot;The Master&quot;</p>

"The Master"

Credit: The Weinstein Company

'The Master' leads San Diego film critics nominations

Helen Hunt gets chalked up as a lead

The San Diego Film Critics Society also dropped its nominees over the weekend and, well, they flew under my radar. But here they are, and "The Master" led the way with nine nominations. Not far behind was "Argo" with eight. "Django Unchained' picked up five while "Zero Dark Thirty" only managed four. "Silver Linings Playbook" rounded out the Best Film nominees with six nominations. Check out the full list of nominees below and keep track of the 2012-2013 film awards season via The Circuit.

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<p>A scene from &quot;Lincoln&quot;</p>

A scene from "Lincoln"

Credit: Touchstone Pictures

'Lincoln' leads Washington DC Area film critics nominations, 'Zero Dark Thirty' wins

'Les Misérables' also had a strong showing in the nominations

The Washington D.C. Area Film Critics Association announced its list of nominees for the 2012 film awards season yesterday. Had no idea. Then winners today. A little too quick a turnaround, folks. Anyway, no surprise that Steven Spielberg's "Lincoln" led the field with eight nominations. Tom Hooper's "Les Misérables" wasn't far behind with seven. But it was "Zero Dark Thirty" that took the wins for Best Picture and Best Director. It wouldn't be too crazy to expect a number of these categories to match up perfectly with Oscar. Check out the full list of nominees and winners (***) below, and remember to keep track of the 2012-2013 film awards season via The Circuit.

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<p>Christian Bale in &quot;The&nbsp;Dark&nbsp;Knight Rises&quot;</p>

Christian Bale in "The Dark Knight Rises"

Credit: Warner Bros. Pictures

'Argo,' 'Dark Knight Rises,' 'Django Unchained' make AFI's top 10 American films list for 2012

The usual collection of studio and indie fare

Adding another announcement to the stack this week is the American Film Institute. Remember, the Institute's annual list of the year's best films is limited to American cinema, so you won't see efforts like "Amour" or "Skyfall" pop up. Nevertheless, I think plenty of great American cinema is often avoided by this list in favor of the most obvious mixture of studio and indie fare.

Last year, for instance, standard awards-hunt comedies like "Bridesmaids" and "Midnight in Paris" that were threatening inclusion in the Best Picture field at the time made the cut, as well as those which clearly weren't, like Clint Eastwood's "J. Edgar."

Be sure to circle back on Friday for the podcast where Anne and I will reveal our own top 10s for the year. For all my snarkiness about this lot's list, I'd be dishonest if I didn't admit a fair share of them made my own collective.

Check out the full AFI list below.

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The mock execution scene from "Argo," which William Goldenberg explains he used to frame another sequence, to dramatic effect.
The mock execution scene from "Argo," which William Goldenberg explains he used to frame another sequence, to dramatic effect.
Credit: Warner Bros. Pictures

Tech Support: William Goldenberg on building tension in 'Argo' and 'Zero Dark Thirty'

The BSFC- and LAFCA-winning editor's busy year could yield a pair of Oscar nods

Duck into any number of industry -- and likely public -- screenings of Ben Affleck's "Argo" in the final moments of the film, and you're sure to hear a big burst of applause. It happens at the same moment every time: CIA agent Tony Mendez (Affleck) peers out the window of a plane he and six American embassy workers have boarded to flee Iran under the guise of a film crew as a number of soldiers wise to their plans at the last minute chase the flight down. The plane gains momentum then it's wheels up and, after a tense moment, clarity sets: they got away.

It's fair to attribute that burst of applause to the release of tension. The nail-biting final sequence of the film builds to a crescendo and is expertly assembled to play on that tension. But for editor William Goldenberg, with those kinds of sequences, you have to remain focused on the characters.

"That’s what I try to keep in my mind when I’m cutting it," Goldenberg says. "You’re trying to put the audience in the head of these people and not just make it about the event but the story of each person and what they’re going through, always keeping it personal. And luckily for me, the actors were all so good at being in the moment, being terrified but being under control at the same time. It made for great editing opportunities.

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<p>Bradley Cooper in &quot;Silver Linings Playbook.&quot;</p>

Bradley Cooper in "Silver Linings Playbook."

Credit: The Weinstein Company

Roundup: Cooper joins the list of Palm Springs honorees

Also: Mark Harris on 'Zero Dark Thirty,' and Tarantino on 'Django' slavery

Bradley Cooper has seemed very much a touch-and-go prospect in a crowded Best Actor field, but the scales slowly seem to be tipping in his favor. In contrast to the perennially ingenue-friendly Best Actress race, youngish Hollywood dreamboats can struggle to win over Academy voters, particularly for romantic and/or comic leads, so Cooper's superb work in "Silver Linings Playbook" is at a disadvantage in several ways. But after last week's unexpected win with the National Board of Review, Cooper has also landed the Desert Palm Award for Achievement in Acting at the Palm Springs Film Festival. He's the first male acting honoree announced for this publicity-heavy Oscar-season pitstop: Sally Field, Helen Hunt, Naomi Watts and the "Argo" ensemble are also getting a boost there. The list of recent Desert Palm winners includes Colin Firth, Jeff Bridges and Daniel Day-Lewis, which doesn't hurt Cooper's Oscar voodoo any. [PSIFF]

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