Telluride Reviews: '99 Homes,' 'Madame Bovary,' ''71,' 'Wild Tales'

Telluride Reviews: '99 Homes,' 'Madame Bovary,' ''71,' 'Wild Tales'

Some thoughts on some of the fall's more intriguing titles

TELLURIDE — It's impossible to see every movie at a film festival, but you can certainly come close if you're able to catch a few of the main centerpieces beforehand. At Telluride, the benefit of having viewed "Foxcatcher," "Mr. Turner," "Mommy" and "The Homesman" at Cannes allowed this pundit to catch a few of the lower profile titles that are still worthy of your attention. Here are a few short capsule reviews for some films that will also screen at the Toronto and New York film festivals and that should most definitely be on your radar.

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George Clooney to take on Rupert Murdoch in film about British phone-hacking scandal
Credit: AP Photo

George Clooney to take on Rupert Murdoch in film about British phone-hacking scandal

Actor will direct an adaptation of the Nick Davies book 'Hack Attack'

George Clooney has Rupert Murdoch in his sights. The "Descendants" star has signed on to helm an adaptation of "Hack Attack," a recent book by Nick Davies that dissects the British phone-hacking scandal which implicated Murdoch's News International subsidiary and led to the shuttering of long-running U.K. tabloid "News of the World," according to Deadline. Clooney will also produce the Sony project alongside his Smokehouse Pictures partner Grant Heslov.

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10 burning questions for the Toronto Film Festival: Bill Murray, Jennifer Aniston and more

10 burning questions for the Toronto Film Festival: Bill Murray, Jennifer Aniston and more

AKA: Why Toronto is still important (we think)

Yes, another trek to the Great White North is upon us. After a good eight months of battling their fellow fall festivals for the best possible slate, the 2014 Toronto International Film Festival is ready to let the world see what's behind the curtain.

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Review: Frances McDormand's new mini-series 'Olive Kitteridge' is a perfect storm of talent

Review: Frances McDormand's new mini-series 'Olive Kitteridge' is a perfect storm of talent

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Tearjerking and funny TV comes to Venice

VENICE - My goodness, but "Olive Kitteridge" makes creating great TV look as simple as following a recipe. Let's say you want to create a truly wonderful miniseries. A good place to start would be picking great source material that nevertheless comes without too much cultural baggage or a mouthy fandom. An excellent and recent Pulitzer winning novel by Elizabeth Strout would seem to fit the bill. You want great performances? Easy, let's employ some great leads. Frances McDormand, Richard Jenkins, Bill Murray and Zoe Kazan should do for starters. Oh, you want great support too? Fine, simply round out the cast with the likes of Peter Mullan, John Gallagher Jr. and Brady Corbet. Of course you'll need a director. Apparently Lisa Cholodenko of "The Kids Are All Right" fame is free. Perfect. Jeffrey M. Werner, the editor Cholodenko worked with on that self same film, is available too. And for your cinematographer, a huge coup: Frederick Elmes, who has shot a ton of David Lynch, Ang Lee and Jim Jarmusch pictures is on board. The cherry on top is Carter Burwell as composer.

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'Imitation Game' wins the festival and 7 other takeaways from Telluride 2014

'Imitation Game' wins the festival and 7 other takeaways from Telluride 2014

Can you imagine who is more popular than Channing Tatum and Reese Witherspoon?

TELLURIDE — The 41st Annual Telluride Film Festival is over, and as noted by HitFix's own Kris Tapley, it has provided an important awards season kickoff for films such as "Birdman," "The Imitation Game," "Wild," "Rosewater" and "Foxcatcher." Even with the recent star power of George Clooney and Brad Pitt, Telluride has been able to hang on to its singular charms as a non-red carpet, low-key, cinephile event (even if there were two new Canadian journalists on hand to check everything out and report back to the motherland).  

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<p>&quot;The Imitation Game&quot;</p>

"The Imitation Game"

Credit: The Weinstein Company

Off the Carpet: Venice and Telluride signal the starting gun

A varied slate begins to take shape

I came into this year's Telluride Film Festival feeling like the upcoming awards season looked a bit thin. I'll be leaving it excited for its potential and eager to see it take further shape. Seeing some of the films helps, yes, but there's also a context that begins to surface around this time, when strategies start clicking together and you can sense who has the goods, and who has a steep climb ahead of them.

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'Birdman' director Alejandro González Iñárritu has a problem with the word 'hero'

'Birdman' director Alejandro González Iñárritu has a problem with the word 'hero'

The maestro talks Michael Keaton, meta commentary and the 'disease' of superheroes

TELLURIDE — "Birdman" has arrived stateside and made as significant an impact as it did at the Venice Film Festival last week. You won't run into too many people who have managed to catch it at one of its packed screenings who weren't completely blown away by the accomplishment, and for director Alejandro González Iñárritu, it was clearly a much-needed exercise in self-reflection away from the somber fray of his filmography to date.

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Review: Katherine Heigl country romance 'Jackie & Ryan' is corny but well-acted

Review: Katherine Heigl country romance 'Jackie & Ryan' is corny but well-acted

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Ami Canaan Mann brings Utah to the Lido

VENICE — Director Ami Canaan Mann's country music romance "Jackie & Ryan" is a film that raises many questions. The first is: Christ, is that dirt on his hands or some singularly ill-advised finger tattoos? Yep, those are definitely finger tattoos. And not very good finger tattoos. But let's try not to be personally offensive or get too hung up on some really, really bad finger tattoos. The hands defaced by the finger tattoos (did I mention the finger tattoos? They're just awful) belong to Ben Barnes' country singer Ryan, whom we meet as he brews his morning pot of coffee on a goods train heading in the general direction of Ogden, Utah. These hands are soon revealed to be instrumental to turning the engine of the plot, such as it is - these hands play guitar, fix roofs and politely caress Katherine Heigl's single mom Jackie.

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Steven Spielberg encouraged Tommy Lee Jones during the making of 'The Homesman'
Credit: Saban Films

Steven Spielberg encouraged Tommy Lee Jones during the making of 'The Homesman'

After all, the 'Lincoln' director 'knows a thing or two about movies'

TELLURIDE — I didn't quite know what to say or think about Tommy Lee Jones' "The Homesman" after catching up with it Sunday afternoon, but I was pretty sure I loved it. Gorgeously shot by Rodrigo Prieto, lovingly scored by Marco Beltrami, enigmatically captured by Jones, the film almost becomes a series of vignettes at some point, dealing in western iconography in ways both familiar and foreign, truly a piece of work from the same voice that gave us "The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada."

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Where does Laika go after 'The Boxtrolls?'

Where does Laika go after 'The Boxtrolls?'

In depth with filmmakers Anthony Stacchi and Graham Annable and Laika CEO Travis Knight

BEVERLY HILLS — Laika's "The Boxtrolls" saw its world premiere over the weekend at the Venice Film Festival, the third in a line of movies from the Portland-based animation studio that have aimed to push the medium at every step. Directed by Anthony Stacchi and Graham Annable, the film is, like all Laika product, its own world, a dank, cockney yarn that, as ever, serves as a showcase for the company's craft prowess.

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