<p>&quot;Star Trek IV:&nbsp;The&nbsp;Voyage Home&quot;&nbsp;held the franchise record for Oscar nominations alone until J.J. Abrams came calling.</p>

"Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home" held the franchise record for Oscar nominations alone until J.J. Abrams came calling.

Credit: Paramount Pictures

'Star Trek' at the Oscars

How has the franchise fared at the Academy Awards over the decades?

J.J. Abrams' "Star Trek Into Darkness" has arrived. From here the film goes out into the unforgiving summer and we'll just have to see where it stands fiscally on the other side of things. But I imagine at the very least its various craft achievements will be in the awards discussion at the end of the year.

So with that in mind, how has a franchise that spans 12 films over 34 years fared at the Academy Awards all this time? It seemed like something worth digging into for our purposes here and with the new film on screens, so let's take a look…

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<p>Benicio Del Toro in &quot;Jimmy P.&quot;</p>

Benicio Del Toro in "Jimmy P."

Credit: Worldview Entertainment

Cannes Review: Benicio Del Toro clears his head (but not much else) in dreary 'Jimmy P'

HitFix
C-
Readers
n/a
Competition's first outright dud is a major letdown from Arnaud Desplechin

CANNES - Something's ailing Benicio Del Toro's title character in "Jimmy P. (Psychotherapy of a Plains Indian)," but let's lay that to one side for now. More pressingly, what is up with Arnaud Desplechin? The French writer-director is typically one of his country's liveliest talents, with big, crowded, unapologetically chaotic films like "A Christmas Tale" and "Kings and Queen" bristling with emotional and intellectual curiosity -- but he's come a cropper in this lethargic, self-important psychiatry study, which he himself seems to have directed from the couch.

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<p>One of the tamer scenes from &quot;Stranger by the Lake.&quot;</p>

One of the tamer scenes from "Stranger by the Lake."

Credit: Les Films du Losange

Cannes Review: 'Stranger by the Lake' is a stylish new entry in the porn-noir genre

HitFix
B
Readers
n/a
Un Certain Regard entry sets pulses racing with surfeit of steamy gay action

CANNES - Nothing I've seen at Cannes so far -- not even the current Palme d'Or favorite, Hirokazu Kore-eda's button-cute parenthood drama "Like Father, Like Son" -- has, to my ear, pushed the end-credits clap-o-meter quite as far into the red as Alain Guiraudie's Un Certain Regard entry "Stranger by the Lake." Elated whoops and whistles greeted this minimalist French thriller's final fade to black: not the reaction you'd usually expect from a civilian festival crowd for a work of such sleek, stark nihilism as to prompt visions of Robert Bresson adapting Patricia Highsmith. All of which leads me to at least one conclusion: audiences out there are really starved for gay sex.

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<p>Carey Mulligan cheeses for press at this year's Cannes Film&nbsp;Festival.</p>

Carey Mulligan cheeses for press at this year's Cannes Film Festival.

Credit: AP Photo

Thomas Vinterberg to adapt 'Far from the Madding Crowd' with Carey Mulligan

Matthias Schoenaerts will also star in the Fox Searchlight co-production

A year ago at Cannes, Dogme 95 co-founding filmmaking Thomas Vinterberg was stirring up talk with his film "The Hunt." It went on to win an acting award for Mads Mikkelsen, currently creeping out television audiences in NBC's "Hannibal." Drew was a fan of the film, noting that it "infuriates in all the right ways." This year's fest brings news for Vinterberg's next.

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<p>&quot;Frances Ha&quot;</p>

"Frances Ha"

Credit: IFC Films

Tell us what you thought of 'Frances Ha'

Noah Baumbach's latest heads out in limited release this weekend

Here's some counter-programming for you. Noah Baumbach's "Frances Ha" is slipping into select theaters this year as "Star Trek Into Darkness" dominates the wide release conversation. I saw and was delighted by the film at the 2012 Telluride Film Festival, and that's coming from someone not particularly in love with Baumbach's aesthetic. It's also one of our under-the-radar films for the 2013 summer movie season. Will we be talking about the screenplay and Greta Gerwig's performance come Oscar time? Can the film push out of the critics and indie awards circuits? Time will tell, but for now, those of you who get around to seeing it (or have caught it on the festival circuit the last few months), tell us what you thought in the comments section and by voting in our poll below.

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<p>&quot;Star Trek Into Darkness&quot;</p>

"Star Trek Into Darkness"

Credit: Paramount Pictures

Tell us what you thought of 'Star Trek Into Darkness'

The wrath of a sequel lands on screens this weekend

It's here. Was the mystery box worth it? You tell us. Yes, J.J. Abrams' "Star Trek Into Darkness" is finally in theaters and I imagine many of you have either seen it already or will be making it out to see it this weekend. We've covered it about as much as we can. Drew's review was favorable. We charted the best and worst of the franchise to date. There are plenty of interviews to chew on at the site. (And stay tuned this weekend for some discussion on "Star Trek" at the Oscars.) But now it's your turn to tell us what you thought. Dug it? Didn't? Give us your take in the comments section, and as always, feel free to boldly vote in our poll below.

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Bérénice Bejo in "The Past."
Bérénice Bejo in "The Past."
Credit: Memento Films

Cannes Review: 'The Past' is an intimate but exacting breakdown of several separations

HitFix
B+
Readers
A-
Asghar Farhadi's follow-up to Oscar-winning 'A Separation' plays to his strengths

CANNES - For Iranian auteur Asghar Farhadi, following up the near-unanimous acclaim of his Oscar-winning 2011 film "A Separation" with a similarly articulate dramatic study of, well, separation was either the most foolhardy thing he could do -- or the smartest. An intricately knotted, almost exhaustingly even-handed examination of tensions and untruths in a trio of marriages -- one past, one future and one stuck in a purgatorial present -- "The Past" further showcases Farhadi's dexterity as a dramatist of uncommon perspicacity and fairness.

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Ranking 30 years of 'Star Trek' at the movies

Ranking 30 years of 'Star Trek' at the movies

Where will 'Star Trek Into Darkness' fit in?

A new Starfleet adventure hits theaters this weekend in the form of "Star Trek Into Darkness." It will enter a long legacy of films capturing the spirit of Gene Roddenberry, including, of course, the 2009 reboot that paved the way for a sequel.

The crew's first celluloid excursion, "Star Trek: The Motion Picture," was released back in 1979. There was a new "Star Trek" film at least every three or four years until the 30th anniversary brought J.J. Abrams' re-imagining. Going into this weekend's release, that's 11 films, three Enterprise captains and a lot of canon to play with.

The HitFix staff put our heads together to crank out a ranked list of those films. But how will "Star Trek Into Darkness" fit into that legacy? Audiences will find out this weekend, but for now, click through the gallery below for the best and worst of the franchise to date. You can rate the films as you go. And feel free to vote on your favorite "Star Trek" film in the poll as well.

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<p>A scene from &quot;Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon&quot;</p>

A scene from "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon"

Credit: Sony Classics

'Crouching Tiger' sequel to be directed by 'The Matrix' and 'Kill Bill' choreographer Yuen Wo Ping

The 'Drunken Master' filmmaker's spin goes into production next year

The Weinstein Company has announced today that production on "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon II: The Green Destiny" will begin in March of 2014 in Asia. Yuen Wo Ping is set to direct after serving as a choreographer on the original film, which was directed by Ang Lee and was nominated for 10 Academy Awards, winning four.

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<p>Robin Wright in &quot;The Congress.&quot;</p>

Robin Wright in "The Congress."

Credit: Summit Entertainment

Cannes Review: Robin Wright gets animated in messy, sometimes mesmerizing 'The Congress'

HitFix
B-
Readers
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Ari Folman's 'Waltz With Bashir' follow-up opens Directors' Fortnight at Cannes

CANNES - Most likely in sheer desperation at having to say anything at all about Colin Farrell dud "Dead Man Down," veteran critic David Thomson recently turned his review into a plea to Hollywood casting directors to make bolder, braver, weirder choices -- to throw gender and other demographic demarcations to the wind and let familiar screen stars become other people entirely. "We need to revolutionize casting," he wrote, "often enough to live up to our sense of ourselves: that we are not one fixed persona -- we contain multitudes."

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