<p>&quot;Inside Llewyn&nbsp;Davis&quot;&nbsp;missed out on a PGA nod, but then, so did Best Picture nominee &quot;A&nbsp;Serious Man.&quot;</p>

"Inside Llewyn Davis" missed out on a PGA nod, but then, so did Best Picture nominee "A Serious Man."

Credit: CBS Films

What today's PGA announcement means for Oscar

Which film(s) won't carry over to a Best Picture nomination?

The Best Picture Oscar nominees that failed to receive PGA nominations in the last four years — i.e. the relevant era — are "The Blind Side," "A Serious Man," "Winter's Bone," "Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close," "The Tree of Life" and "Amour." So there is hope yet for films like "Inside Llewyn Davis," "Lee Daniels' The Butler" and "Philomena" that absolutely have support within the Academy but missed out on recognition this morning. And also note, one of the films that missed with PGA over the last four years was a Coen brothers effort that manifested great passion within the Academy.

The films that made the PGA cut but missed with Oscar over that stretch are "Invictus," "Star Trek," "The Town," "Bridesmaids," "The Ides of March," "The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo," "Moonrise Kingdom" and "Skyfall." There are more misses because the PGA has stuck with 10 nominees over the last two years, when the Academy changed its rules slightly to allow for anywhere from five to 10 nominees (and have ended up with nine both years). So someone from today's announcement will absolutely be left off, but who?

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'American Hustle,' 'Gravity' and '12 Years a Slave' earn PGA nods

'American Hustle,' 'Gravity' and '12 Years a Slave' earn PGA nods

'Inside Llewyn Davis' snubbed by producers in best picture precursor

The Producers Guild of America announced the 10 nominees for theatrical picture and animated picture categories today for the upcoming 25th PGA Awards and familiar names such as "American Hustle," "Gravity," "12 Years A Slave," "The Croods" and "Frozen" made the cut.  Surprisingly, the Coen Bros' and Scott Rudin produced "Inside Llewyn Davis" and The Weinstein Company's "Lee Daniels' The Butler" was snubbed from the 10 motion picture honorees.

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<p>Leonardo DiCaprio and Martin&nbsp;Scorsese on the set of &quot;The Wolf of&nbsp;Wall&nbsp;Street&quot;</p>

Leonardo DiCaprio and Martin Scorsese on the set of "The Wolf of Wall Street"

Credit: Paramount Pictures

'Wolf of Wall Street's' DiCaprio and Scorsese to receive Santa Barbara fest honor

Plus: Thoughts from both on their on-going partnership

The last couple of days of the year were pretty electric for Martin Scorsese, Leonardo DiCaprio and "The Wolf of Wall Street." The perception out there was that they — particularly DiCaprio, who hopped on the phone with a number of outlets on Monday (including this one) — were backed into a corner and needed to defend their film against an array of accusations. The studio probably wanted the bad press tapered, but whatever the case, it's been a bumpy road this holiday for a film some consider unequivocally the year's best, others consider an abomination.

But here at the beginning of the year, whether Oscar and guild nominations are in the film's future or not, there will be tribute love for the two creative forces from the Santa Barbara International Film Festival. Paired up, DiCaprio and Scorsese will receive the fest's Cinema Vanguard Award on Thursday, Feb. 6 at the historic Arlington Theatre.

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<p>A scene from the set of &quot;Her.&quot;&nbsp;</p>

A scene from the set of "Her." 

Credit: Warner Bros. Pictures

Roundup: Piecing together the fragments of 'Her'

Also: The back-and-forth debate of 'The Wolf of Wall Street' continues

One of the year's most complex achievements in film editing, I think, is one likely to go unrecognized at Oscar time: Eric Zumbrunnen's meticulous cutting of "Her," which goes a long way toward creating a convincing character and a relationship -- more or less literally -- out of thin air. In the last part of the LA Times's excellent "Five Days of 'Her'" series, Zumbrunnen discusses the challenges the film posed, notably the tricky process of replacing a key performance in post-production, as well as the decision over whether or not to feature a physical representation of Scarlett Johansson's Samantha on screen. Fascinating stuff. [LA Times]

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<p>Angela Lansbury at the Governors' Awards in November.</p>

Angela Lansbury at the Governors' Awards in November.

Credit: AP Photo

Angela Lansbury ends a good year with a royal honor

The veteran actress now has a damehood to go with her honorary Oscar

It's been a pretty good year to be Angela Lansbury -- or Dame Angela Lansbury, should you now wish to address her as such. The 88-year-old actress is the most prominent film-related name on the annual New Year Honors list -- titles and citations presented by Queen Elizabeth II to those deemed worthy in any number of areas. For her services to the arts, Lansbury has been declared a DBE -- or Dame Commander of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, if you want to get wordy about it.

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<p>Sandra Bullock and George Clooney in &quot;Gravity.&quot;</p>

Sandra Bullock and George Clooney in "Gravity."

Credit: Warner Bros. Pictures

Roundup: Is it time for two cinematography Oscars?

Also: U2 win Palm Springs award, and what's disappearing from Netflix?

With Emmanuel Lubezki almost certain to take the Best Cinematography Oscar for "Gravity," few will argue that he's well past due the award -- but many will take issue with the technical implications of such FX-integrated work being recognized in such a fashion. It's an issue that now surfaces on a near-annual basis (wins for "Avatar" and "Life of Pi," in particular, caused a stir), and filmmaker Jamie Stuart thinks it's time "to redefine what constitutes cinematography." Part of that movement, he says, should be to divide the Oscar into two awards: "one for conventional live-action cinematography, and another for CGI-based filmmaking," much as black-and-white and color work was recognized separately until 1967. He's not the first to advocate such a change. What do you think? [Indiewire]

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First Look: Christian Bale as Moses in Ridley Scott's 'Exodus'
Credit: 20th Century Fox

First Look: Christian Bale as Moses in Ridley Scott's 'Exodus'

Biblical drama is slated for release next holiday season

Next year's holiday season has arrived a tad earlier than expected.

Our first look at Ridley Scott's "Exodus" (currently slated to hit theaters on Dec. 12, 2014) is certainly an eye-popping image, as the Biblical prophet Moses (Christian Bale) rides his horse into a scene that appears to feature an under-construction version of the Great Sphinx of Giza. Scripted by Steven Zaillian ("Moneyball," "The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo") from an earlier draft by Bill Collage and Adam Cooper ("Accepted"), the forthcoming epic will focus on the Biblical exodus of the Israelite slaves from Egypt under Moses's leadership. It also stars Joel Edgerton as Egyptian pharaoh Ramesses II, Aaron Paul as Israeli spy Joshua, Sigourney Weaver as Ramesses' mother Tuya, John Turturro as Ramesses' father Seti I and Ben Kingsley as a Hebrew scholar.

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<p>Tom Hanks in &quot;Saving&nbsp;Mr. Banks&quot;</p>

Tom Hanks in "Saving Mr. Banks"

Credit: Walt Disney Pictures

'Saving Mr. Banks' production designer Michael Corenblith on bringing the world of Disney to life

Part of the magic of the movie is its recreation of a time and place

"Saving Mr. Banks" is currently delighting audiences with its take on Walt Disney, P.L. Travers and the making of "Mary Poppins." But part of the magic of the movie is the recreation of a time and place, and the individual in charge of the art department that brought that world to life is production designer Michael Corenblith.

Corenblith has worked with director John Lee Hancock since 2004's "The Alamo," which was a project of note at the time due to a 51-acre set that was the largest and most expensive set built in North America. Both proud natives of Texas, the two have had a deepening relationship that began on that first feature, which was a personal project for both. "It was amazing – the congruence of the way we saw," Corenblith says with a degree of marvel. "Our processes were immediately aligned. We began to grow in depth and complexity when we collaborated on 'The Blind Side.'"

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<p>Leonardo DiCaprio in &quot;The Wolf of Wall&nbsp;Street&quot;</p>

Leonardo DiCaprio in "The Wolf of Wall Street"

Credit: Paramount Pictures

Leonardo DiCaprio says 'Wolf' critics 'missed the boat entirely'

The actor/producer responds to accusations that his latest work is a glorification

Martin Scorsese's latest film, "The Wolf of Wall Street," hit theaters over the holiday and was met with very interesting reactions. In some corners, it's an unqualified masterpiece, willfully overt and satirical in its depiction of greed and excess. In others, it's an irresponsible culprit that appears to be delighting in the wild ride it depicts.

For the film's producer and star Leonardo DiCaprio, it is a bit of both, as the sheer entertainment of the piece isn't meant to be at odds with its social indictment. That, in some ways, is the horror of it. But it certainly isn't the first Scorsese film to cause a stir upon release and it won't likely be the last.

DiCaprio recently spoke to HitFix about the high ambition of the project, the gobsmacked reaction it has received and how not just his work in "The Wolf of Wall Street," but his involvement in Baz Luhrmann's "The Great Gatsby" earlier this year and Quentin Tarantino's "Django Unchained" in 2012 have all been an examination of a shared theme: pursuit of a corrupted American dream.

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<p>Ecuador's Oscar entry &quot;Porcelain Horse.&quot;</p>

Ecuador's Oscar entry "Porcelain Horse."

Credit: Figa Films

Roundup: What foreign Oscar contenders gain, even when they lose

Also: The best movie costumes of 2013, and ranking Scorsese's filmography

When the shortlist of Best Foreign Language Film Oscar contenders was announced before Christmas, the dreams of 67 competing entrants were dashed in one fell swoop -- an unkind cut considering the effort that goes into mounting campaigns for many of them, with no time to spare. In an interesting piece, John Anderson looks at the ins and outs of these low-profile but high-effort campaigns, particularly through those of three films -- from Montenegro, Ecuador and Peru -- that missed the cut. Publicist Kathleen McInnis explains why it's worth the effort, even if you know you have no shot: "It’s also the time of year when Hollywood is paying attention to foreign film. Which means I can get my filmmaker in front of audiences who might otherwise never see his film, get him meetings with agents and managers because he was his country’s official selection. I can get him in front of people, not so much for this film, but to help other films.” [New York Times]

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