<p>Margot Robbie and Leonardo DiCaprio in &quot;The Wolf of Wall Street.&quot;</p>

Margot Robbie and Leonardo DiCaprio in "The Wolf of Wall Street."

Credit: Paramount Pictures

Tell us what you thought of 'The Wolf of Wall Street'

Martin Scorsese's crazed trip finally hits theaters today

He kept us waiting, but it's finally heeeeeere: for a time, it seemed that Martin Scorsese's long, crazed trip through the stock-market hedonism of the 80s and early 90s might not manage a 2013 release at all, but it's now in theaters as the year's most deliciously inappropriate Christmas gift. It was such a late arrival that I still haven't got a bead on the critical consensus, though it already has a number of fiercely devoted admirers -- including HitFix's Drew McWeeny, while you can read Kris's early reaction here.

I'm still sorting out my feelings about it: it's certainly a frenzied blast of energy, and I was more stimulated than I was by Scorsese's last two films. At the same time, however, I wasn't left with much when the circus was over: its moral stance, such as it is, is laid out early on, leaving us jogging furiously in place for three hours. Largely the point, no doubt, but still. Anyway, we're curious to know how you land on this one: share your thoughts here, and vote in the poll below.

<p>Willem Dafoe in &quot;The Last Temptation of Christ&quot;</p>

Willem Dafoe in "The Last Temptation of Christ"

Credit: Universal Pictures

Thelma Schoonmaker recalls the heated controversy and moving testament of 'The Last Temptation of Christ'

'I started crying in dailies. That hardly ever happens.'

Talking with Thelma Schoonmaker recently, it became quickly apparent that I wasn't even going to scratch the surface of her career's work with Martin Scorsese in a single piece. I couldn't help but play the retrospective game with her, and while I of course didn't address all 19 feature collaborations, I was curious about six films in particular that I think represent a nice cross-section of their work together. Each of them — "Who's That Knocking At My Door," "Raging Bull," "The Last Temptation of Christ," "Goodfellas," "Bringing Out the Dead" and "The Departed" — will get its own space in the next few days.

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<p>Ben Stiller in &quot;The Secret Life of Walter Mitty.&quot;</p>

Ben Stiller in "The Secret Life of Walter Mitty."

Credit: 20th Century Fox

Tell us what you thought of 'The Secret Life of Walter Mitty'

Ben Stiller has a Christmas present for you

Every year, there's at least one major holiday release that I don't get round to before, well, the holidays -- or, in my case, January -- and Ben Stiller's "The Secret Life of Walter Mitty" is that film this year. (I'll get to it, for sure; "Zoolander" loyalty dies hard.) A lot of my more cynically inclined colleagues would tell me that I passed on the right one: after having Oscar buzz for about a minute and landing a prestigious New York Film Festival slot, the romantic fantasy has landed pretty softly with critics -- not that Stiller has ever made films for them anyway. In any event, it looks like audiences will be more charmed by its whimsy: are any of you checking it out this Christmas? Share your thoughts here if so, and be sure to vote in the poll below.

<p>Greta Gerwig (with seasonal wreath) in &quot;Frances Ha.&quot;</p>

Greta Gerwig (with seasonal wreath) in "Frances Ha."

Credit: IFC Films

Guy Lodge's top 10 films of 2013

My personal pick of a very good year

And then there were 10. Yesterday, I counted down my first 15 favorites of the year -- though to be honest, it was a list that could significantly have changed, both in selections and arrangement, from one day to the next. My top 10 has felt a little firmer to me for some time, but that's not because these films particularly belong in a league above the rest. Rather, as I mentioned in my intro yesterday, it's the shape and synthesis of this collective that feels satisfying to me -- disparate as the choices may be, they're unified in my mind by threads both obvious (the list is bookended by the two faces of a single star, for starters) and less immediately apparent until the films are placed side by side.

Taken together, the list might say more about me than it does about the year in film -- which is how I prefer it. It was a very good year, by agreement, though as festivals keep mushrooming, while methods and means of global distribution keep expanding, no one viewer's 12 months at the movies looks quite like another's.

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<p>Matthew Goode in &quot;Stoker.&quot;</p>

Matthew Goode in "Stoker."

Credit: Fox Searchlight Pictures

Guy Lodge's top 25 films of 2013: #25-11

Before we get to the Top 10, the best of the rest

Tomorrow, because it's December 25 and nobody typically has much going on that day, I will finally reveal my top 10 films of 2013. And with the final draft of the list having sat in my head for about a week now, I'm pretty happy with it -- not just because it's a fine bunch of films (from one's own perspective, at least, that should go without saying), but because I'm positive that the 10 I chose are also the right ones in defining and outlining the year I had at the movies; the more I think about them, the more unexpected connections, parallels and complementary differences emerge alongside the intended ones.

Still, list-making is never an entirely satisfying process, and as I mulled over my initial longlist of over 60 titles for consideration,10 came to seem a thoroughly inadequate number -- it always is, really, but too many films meant too much to me this year to go by unthanked.

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<p>A scene from&nbsp;&quot;Bringing Out the Dead&quot;</p>

A scene from "Bringing Out the Dead"

Credit: Paramount Pictures

Thelma Schoonmaker hopes Martin Scorsese's 'Bringing Out the Dead' will eventually get its due

An undercurrent of faith marks the film as quintessential Scorsese

Talking with Thelma Schoonmaker recently, it became quickly apparent that I wasn't even going to scratch the surface of her career's work with Martin Scorsese in a single piece. I couldn't help but play the retrospective game with her, and while I of course didn't address all 19 feature collaborations, I was curious about six films in particular that I think represent a nice cross-section of their work together. Each of them — "Who's That Knocking At My Door," "Raging Bull," "The Last Temptation of Christ," "Goodfellas," "Bringing Out the Dead" and "The Departed" — will get its own space in the next few days.

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Amy Adams on surrendering to David O. Russell's process in 'American Hustle'

Amy Adams on surrendering to David O. Russell's process in 'American Hustle'

Plus: Why a willfully dodgy English accent was freeing for the actress

"American Hustle" star Amy Adams has been recognized by both the Hollywood Foreign Press Association and the Broadcast Film Critics Association this season. But in both instances she was relegated to designated comedy categories and it remains to be seen whether she can crack what has for months been a rather tight lead actress Oscar line-up.

With "Hustle" moving out into wider release this past weekend and scoring well at the box office, and as the film continues to find purchase with Academy voters, she might just find a foothold. She has her fans, but she also has her detractors, many of which highlight a flailing English accent as part of the trouble. But that can also be explained away as a character trait, and as the actress told HitFix in a recent interview, it was sort of freeing to not have to be a perfectionist on that particular detail.

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<p>Julie Andrews in &quot;Mary Poppins.&quot;</p>

Julie Andrews in "Mary Poppins."

Credit: Walt Disney Pictures

Roundup: Does 'Mary Poppins' still fly?

Also: THR's composers' roundtable, and Italy's '12 Years a Slave' blunder

Though not a Christmas movie per se, "Mary Poppins" shows up on TV schedules often enough at this time of year that it's come to be an unofficial seasonal staple -- and with "Saving Mr. Banks" now in theaters, more people than usual will be giving it another spin over the holidays. But does it merits its classic status? I'm firmly in the "yes" camp, but Kyle Buchanan is less convinced: "'The Sound of Music' is sturdily structured and well-cast down to its smallest roles; rewatching it now, there's really not a superfluous scene. Not so much with Mary Poppins, y'all ... The good parts are just as good as you remember — it's just that they've been overrun by so many boring parts that it's shocking. For every spoonful of sugar that Mary Poppins offers, there are two more spoons of medicine you've got to take first." Bah, humbug. [Vulture]

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<p>A scene from &quot;Gravity&quot;</p>

A scene from "Gravity"

Credit: Warner Bros.

New 'Gravity' featurette focuses on story and screenplay

The film finds itself in a hugely competitive Best Original Screenplay Oscar race

One of the weaker areas for Alfonso Cuarón's "Gravity" in the eyes of some is its story and screenplay. They cavalierly dismiss it as a ride without thematic substance, though of course they're dead wrong. It's a movie about — as Cuarón has breathlessly said since the beginning — adversity, yes, but also grief and, as cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki noted to me recently, how small we are despite our great personal drama (to steal an idea from Terrence Malick's "The Tree of Life").

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<p>Ralph Fiennes as Charles Dickens in &quot;The Invisible Woman.&quot;</p>

Ralph Fiennes as Charles Dickens in "The Invisible Woman."

Credit: Sony Classics

Ralph Fiennes on bringing sweat to the costume drama in 'The Invisible Woman'

The star also discusses the challenges of directing himself for the second time

It may seem odd, when talking about a director only two films into his career, to describe "The Invisible Woman" as "a very Ralph Fiennes film." By his own admission, the twice Oscar-nominated actor has yet to forge a recurring directorial stamp; both his films exude the confident curiosity of an artist open to any number of ideas and influences.

Yet if the restrained elegancy and disciplined sexuality of "The Invisible Woman" -- a delicate, melancholic costume drama about Nelly Ternan, the historically sidelined mistress of Charles Dickens -- seems natural coming from Fiennes, that's largely because they match his refined, precise qualities as an actor. Those, too, are on display in the film: Fiennes plays Dickens to Felicity Jones's Ternan, and the two have a quiet but urgent chemistry that makes for one of the year's most unexpectedly moving screen romances. Though adapted by Emmy-winning screenwriter Abi Morgan ("The Hour," "The Iron Lady") from a 1991 biography by Claire Tomalin, the relationship at the film's center is still far from common knowledge; Fiennes's film illuminates it with considerable grace.

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