<p>From the first edition of &quot;Mylo Xyloto&quot;</p>

From the first edition of "Mylo Xyloto"

Watch: Coldplay's 'Hurts Like Heaven' video previews 'Mylo' comic book

Every hero needs an origin story

It was back in June that Coldplay announced they'd be releasing a comic book series based on their album "Mylo Xyloto." With the drop of the video for newest single "Hurts Like Heaven," the British band has opened up a sneak peek into its namesake's start.

The clip is composed of comics panels rendered into 3D views, but not animated in the traditional sense. It follows a fivesome of colorful mischief-makers, oppressed by the overlord Major Minus (which, notably, is the same name as one of the tracks on the album "Mylo Xyloto). They plaster the streets in graffiti as they're chased, with two of the leaders in love.

See, it seems Major Minus hates sound, color and love. You see how this love story may end. But every comic book hero needs an origin story. At the end, Mylo is made known.

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<p>Arcade Fire</p>

Arcade Fire

Credit: Anton Corbijn

Watch: Arcade Fire perform new song 'Crucified Again' live

Beach Boys didn't split after all...

Arcade Fire seemed to be dormant there for a minute, but the band popped up late last week to perform at a  charity gig and brought a new song with them.

"Crucified Again" springs forth from a similar lyrical vein as "Neon Bible" -- religion, hypocrisy, personal value -- but has some serious '60s girl group and Beach Boys vibrations in it slow-moving organ part and three part harmonies.

The fan group over at ArcadeFireTube mentions that "Crucified Again" made its debut in 2011 in Haiti, but nobody had captured the performance on camera. This New York gig marks a first for that.

The Partners in Health 25th anniversary party was held at Guastavino's; the non-profit has been among the band's favorite groups.

No word when the Montreal-based crew will be dropping a follow-up to "The Suburbs," but they were around for the Canadian Polaris Prize last month.

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<p>Demetri Martin</p>

Demetri Martin

Credit: Comedy Central

HitFix Interview: Demetri Martin on 'Standup Comedian,' Comedy Central, balance

What do Daniel Kitson, Eugene Mirman, John Oliver and John Benjamin have in common?

Demetri Martin's a master of one-liners. For a little more than a decade, he's built off that trade, starting with his first big segment of standup on Comedy Central's "Premium Blend," then touring and fulfilling stints on "The Daily Show" and writing for "Late Night with Conan O'Brien." You could say now he's a renaissance man of comedy, writing books, launching his short-lived sketch show "Important Things with Demetri Martin," acting in "Contagion" and "Taking Woodstock," penning and selling screenplays and other TV concepts.

However, this week, he's circled back into being the quick, clever standup comedian for the moment -- and wouldn't you guess, it's called "Demetri Martin. Standup Comedian," aired on Comedy Central and out now on CD/DVD. It's his first since 2007's equally dry-titled "Demetri Martin. Person," and it contains the drawing segment and musical interludes that have snuck their way into his usual act. Whatever that is.

But the "Standup" version will last just this little while, as Martin finishes another screenplay and book, the latter due in March, dubbed "Point Your Face at This."

Below is an abridged conversation with the comedian and writer, who's still studying to find a balance.

 

You’ve worked on a few different kind of shows for Comedy Central now, how was making this new special and the experience different?
 
Now I have more creative control over the specials, when I did my first one on the network for “Premium Blend,” it was four minutes on the show. That was in ‘99. In 2003, I shot a “… Presents” and in both of those cases, I show up and they edit. I would go to the tapings, do my live set, and then I’d see the special on TV and it felt like the show had totally changed. Ever since I started doing the drawings, bringing in the boombox and the guitar, I’ve felt like I’d be able to control those segments, and when we go to commercial. From [Comedy Central’s standpoint], it’s hard to edit those things, so what airs is pretty much what I performed.
 
This one just has one segment with the guitar, while some comedians like Reggie Watts and Flight of the Conchords try to integrate music in to all parts of the show, like a musical. How has your relationship to music in the show changed?
 
I started to play music because of the one-man show aspect. It’s like scoring a movie. That’s why I started doing it. I can’t sing so well. I wanted music to do to the pace of the comedy.
 
When I’m doing a headlining show and I’ve got 90-minutes, I can tell when I can bring [the guitar] in. And I’m improving, trying to get better at playing it. I even try to have a guitar on the road, and have Garageband there and ready, so I have this library of my own music. So if show producers ever need music to fill in some spots, I’ve already got some there, and they don’t need to clear music through some other place.
 
As for Flight of the Conchords and Reggie, those guys are real musicians, to their core. If I were that good at that stuff, that's would I would do too.
 
You’re releasing another book in March, what was your approach to it?
 
For me its about finding stories with some surprises in it... [“This Is a Book by Demetri Martin”] had a lot of single panel drawings, poems, one page musings… the next book is going to be a collection of short stories, I’m aiming for things that are a little bit longer. I’m learning how I do it. I really like being a beginner at something., like finding your edges or your limits. The books are informed by stand-ups and pushing those limits.
 
What did you take away from your experience doing the “Important Things” show? Did it help define for your what success or failure in comedy is?
 
I heard this guy give a talk, about there being a difference between being happy and being happy about something, like the experiencing self and remember self. The experience can be feeling really happy lying on a raft in a swimming pool and it’s a hot day and you’ve got a drink and it feels nice. Now, if somebody does a cannonball and you fall off and your drink’s ruined…then your remembering self didn’t have such a good time.
 
So with that, I’m happy about doing the series. While I was doing it, I wasn’t happy. I bit off too much, as a producer, writer, actor. I got everything I wanted in terms of the show, sans marketing. I worked as many hours as I could handle, jammed in as much content as I could, I could act and do a lot of things... I can only do my best. When I’m overwhelmed, I think of that idea of experience and remembering self. I’d love to win trophies, be in movies, have a body of work I’m proud of and find a way to enjoy it along the way. Success is probably a more of a complicated thing than that. As a creative person you want to have a foothold and sense of progress.
 
You’ve already mentioned working in more movies – do you want more work in front or behind the camera?
 
I’d like to make my own movies, and then act in them. That way, I’m pretty sure I’ll be right for the role.
 
I like stand-up. But I’d also like a family and house and a yard. I want to work with a lot of people, have colleagues, and on good film sets, there’s people there that work with the same people for years and years. I love that collaborative spirit in that medium. Comedy is a lot more solitary. Again, its that dichotomy: what I’m experiencing along the way. I’d like to have a little bit more of that balance, writing books, be home and have a regular life and see your friends at night, and not at airports walking through scanning devices. I’m constantly trying to strike the balance.
 
Tell me about some of the most inspired people you’ve been around. What other comedians do you think have struck some balance, or have shown you a way to do things?
 
There are some good friends that I just don’t see often kno how I love standup and I love how they do it. Daniel Kitson, Eugene Mirman, John Oliver, John Benjamin… whether you’ve been in TV spots, or played a festival, or if you’ve bombed, had good shows, got into a long term relationship or had your heart broken, in Scotland or New York… it’s like, You guys get me. None of the guys I listed are “club” comedians, they’re a different kind. The composite of these kind of guys is an understanding of the moment. They remind me about that balance, that it’s not all about comedy, it’s all about the season of a person’s life.

 
You can buy a fat bundle to of "Standup Comedian" on DVD, CD and a T-shirt and print here.

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<p>Adele</p>

Adele

Credit: AP Photo

So, how's that Adele 'Skyfall' theme doing?

Will its release day hurt its opening week rank? Can it make No. 1?

Adele's James Bond theme "Skyfall" finally made its debut after months of speculation that the British singer was confirmed for the spot -- along with hopes that she'd do anything at all this year.

The 24-year-old spent many weeks this year at the Nos. 1-3 slots on The Billboard 200 album sales chart with her album "21," but activity from her camp has been put on hold due to an extensive recovery period after throat surgery, scant appearances around her multiple Grammy wins and then the announcement that she was pregnant with her first child. She and her fiancee have been hush-hush about the baby's due date, but even after she gives birth, she's planning on an extensive holiday.

This is all to say: fans of Adele know that "Skyfall" is likely to be the only thing new from the singer for some time. And like many agree, this is the best James Bond anthem in years. It is also harmless, which all together helps prime the single to be extremely successful.

Clear Channel stations, in one of their new maneuvers to amp-up breaking singles, are playing "Skyfall" every hour on the hour at supporting radio formats (pop, adult pop and adult contemporary). It's stayed put at No. 1 on iTunes, fueled in part by its pre-sale gate-lift on Monday. According to Billboard, digital sales altogether are projected at a around 200,000 by the end of Sunday night. For the record, this week's No. 1 and No. 2 tracks (Maroon 5's "One More Night" and PSY's "Gangnam Style," respectively) had 294,000 and 181,000 in digital sales. So you have some idea where that puts Adele in regard to those points.

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<p>Edward and Bella in &quot;Breaking Dawn - Part 2&quot;</p>

Edward and Bella in "Breaking Dawn - Part 2"

Credit: Summit

'Breaking Dawn - Part 2' soundtrack led by Green Day, Feist, St. Vincent

Tracklist to the final film in the 'Twilight Saga': AI's Paul McDonald, Passion Pit, Ellie Goulding

Remember what I said about Alexandra Patsavas making the soundtrack to "Perks of Being a Wallflower" a love letter to good taste? The music supervisor has crafted an album of exclusive material for "The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn - Part 2" as a love letter between two vampires. And who better than strong solo ladies like Ellie Goulding, Feist, St. Vincent and Christina Perri, and commercial knock-outs Green Day?

Yeah. Because Green Day hasn't been too busy otherwise lately.

The tracklist (via Yahoo!) also has songs form Passion Pit, film composer Carter Burwell and some fun lesser-knowns like Pop ETC and the Boom Circuits. This is a return for Perri, who "Part One" portion of "A Thousand Years" was in the "Breaking Dawn - Part 1."

Hold your breath, too, for real-life lover music-making from former "American Idol" contestant Paul McDonald and his 'Twilight" actress-wife for an untitled work way down on the tally. Goulding's "Bittersweet" is also the first track of hers to be produced by her famous boyfriend Skrillex.

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<p>Ne-Yo at the iHeartRadio festival in September</p>

Ne-Yo at the iHeartRadio festival in September

Credit: AP Photo

Listen: Ne-Yo and Wiz Khalifa combine for 'Don't Make Em Like You'

Just what kind of woman does Ne-Yo want anyway?

Ne-Yo has dropped another ode to the ladies that can conduct themselves like decent human beings, this time with rapper Wiz Khalifa. "Don't Make Em Like You" has the R&B crooner tipping his hat to girls who aren't stumblebum drunk as they leave the club, and he likes you "just the way you are."

It has Khalifa on Cloud Nine, and he devotes his verses to his future wife and baby's mother Amber Rose. Instead all the puffery about puffing, the notorious stoner just leaves the green behind and suffices with a good high giggle at the end of the guest spot.

As for Ne-Yo, dude's got a mixed history of exactly what makes up a good woman. His hit "Miss Independent" likes a girl who can pay her own bills and "doesn't need you." "Let Me Love You (Until You Love Yourself)" on the flip side has the singer falling for someone with poor self-esteem, with the desire to fix her right up. Furthermore, he helped write "Pretty Girl Rock," Keri Hilson's awful failure in girl-power which sets its focus on women's looks and abilities to compete with one another.

Here, 32-year-old Ne-Yo just seems to be beyond the artifice. I'd extrapolate more, but I'm frequently distracted by the overbearing turntable noises and thudding refrain.

Happy to see Wiz in love, though.

The track can be found on Ne-Yo's next album "R.E.D.", due on Nov. 6

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<p>&quot;CeeLo's Magic Moment&quot;</p>

"CeeLo's Magic Moment"

Credit: Atlantic

Watch: CeeLo's 'Silent Night' features bounding Santa babes

What's the holidays without crass winking?

CeeLo Green is among the many pop singers with Christmas efforts coming to town, but the video-makers behind the video for his "Silent Night" can't help but to think of their own, erm, chimneys.

The slo-motion clip features a few Santas and their apparent helpers, who are in their underwear.

The song has a gospel choir and Green impeccable tone. I'm not sure what the audio has to do with the visual, but it helps explaining that this debuted on Maxim. Baby Jesus must be confounded by Los Angeles.

"CeeLo's Magic Moment" will be out in stores on Oct. 30, and will feature cameos from covers-addict Rod Stewart, Green's "The Voice" co-host Christina Aguilera, the Muppets and a capella fever dream Straight No Chaser.

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<p>Miguel: Shhh, I'm making out</p>

Miguel: Shhh, I'm making out

Credit: ByStorm/RCA

Watch: Miguel's 'The Thrill' and 'Do You...' confirm ladies love Miguel

Rising R&B star drops two clips in support of 'Kaleidescope Dream'

This week, after he released his album "Kaleidescope Dream" on Tuesday, Miguel dropped two new music videos that confirm that 1) he is good-looking 2) he has good-looking friends.

Not that I'm trying to look for a stronger brand than "good-looking," but the full-length is dynamic, charismatic and fun-filled, which is hardly portrayed in "The Thrill." It's mostly a tour trailer for his tour trailer entourage, all in black and white ('cause he's classy, get it).

The clip for "Do You..." is much more indicative of the song itself. "Do you like drugs / Do you like hugs... I'm gonna do you like drugs tonight" is hardly poetry: it's cheesy and he knows it. That's why he puts on a bit more of a show, inspired by nightclubs circa 1991, and makes out with a girl on a pool table, circa every movie starring Patrick Swayze. The clunky-ass product placement is the only thing to shake you from this boringly pleasant trip with the 25-year-old rising star.

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<p>Sufjan Stevens' &quot;Silver &amp; Gold&quot;</p>

Sufjan Stevens' "Silver & Gold"

Sufjan Stevens preps new Christmas music boxed set

Listen to 'Christmas Unicorn': it's what you're in for

I'm a sucker for Christmas music. I marvel every year on how holiday album sales go, which songs get a redux from popular artists, how new originals reflect the immediacy of our times. Christmas carols, hymns and songs are not only written with a sense or urgency -- due to the season and any religious connote -- but are frequently performed and delivered with an affecting earnestness, that even the sarcastic odes or parodies are dropped with a sense of projected purpose. Christmas music has weight, and its performers are allowed to indulge.

Sufjan Stevens' first boxed set of Christmas music was five discs long, and was a collection of EPs and long-players intended for dispersal to family and friends from 2001 to 2006. And it sounded that way. Stevens already has this bright-eyed, left-of-center innocence to his voice, and classic anthems on acoustic and banjo is already so divine. His Christian roots also plays into the authentic selection, when he recorded non-Christmas hymns like "Holy, Holy, Holy" and "Come Thou Fount" to include instead of non-religious regulars like "Jingle Bell Rock" or its ilk. He, of course, included some obnoxious and cheeky originals like "Come On! Let's Boogey to the Elf Dance!" and "Did I Make You Cry on Christmas? (Well, You Deserved It!)." (You can tell those, by the excess exclamation points.)

The singer-songwriter will be releasing another new set of Christmas albums, a collection of those from 2007-2012, under the boxed name "Silver & Gold: Songs for Christmas, Volumes 6-10." These, too, were originally released to family and friends. Some of the individual titles (and their respective covers) have dipped into the "silly" costume box, including "Christmas Infinity Voyage," "I Am Santa's Helper" and "Christmas Unicorn."

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<p>Cover art for &quot;Allelujah! Don't Bend! Ascend!&quot;</p>

Cover art for "Allelujah! Don't Bend! Ascend!"

Credit: Constellation

Godspeed You! Black Emperor releasing first album in 10 years

And it's out in two weeks

Lift your skinny fists, Godspeed fans. The Montreal-based sonic boom of a band will be dropping their first album in more than 10 years, with only a two-week wait.

Godspeed You! Black Emperor last released "Yanqui U.X.O." in November 2002, and it was only one of four studio sets the rockers have dropped. Now, "Allelujah! Don't Bend! Ascend!" is due on Oct. 16 in the U.S., with the promise of the "dark" sound matter that made the band pop, whether live or through headphones.

"The future looks dark indeed, but on the evidence of this new recording, Godspeed appears wholly committed to staring it down, channeling it, and fighting for some rays of sound (and flickers of light) that feel hopeful and true," reads a statement in the release.

The songs were formed out of seeds from before their 2003 hiatus; they fleshed them out starting after they reformed in 2010 for select live shows. What exactly that sounds like may be their artful blend of drone, repetition, LOUDquietLOUD, pulsing intergalactic guitar coitus, but the release went more out of its way to explain why the band isn't investing in the whole three-month album promotional cycle.

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