Search

38 search results for What's Wrong With Virginia

Photos

  • Worst-whats-wrong-with-virginia_home_top_story
  • 1.-black-swan_home_top_story

    Top 20 Fox Searchlight releases over their first 20 years

    Type: Gallery | Date: Tuesday, Mar 18, 2014

    Year: 2011 Director: Alexander Payne Starring: George Clooney, Shailene Woo...
  • 16.-anthony-hopkins-the-silence-of-the-lambs_home_top_story

    25 Greatest Oscar winning performances of all time

    Type: Gallery | Date: Monday, Feb 17, 2014

    Category: Best Actress Year: 1979 Strongest Competition: Bette Midler, &quo...
  • Oscar_home_top_story

    An epic interview with 'Inside Llewyn Davis' star Oscar Isaac

    Type: Post | Date: Tuesday, Nov 26, 2013

    And an attempt at nailing down the ethereal genius of the Coens
  • Scandal_home_top_story

    'Scandal' recap: Will Olivia get the truth about Remington out of Fitz?

    Type: Post | Date: Friday, Nov 8, 2013

    Josie Marcus takes a bite out of gender stereotypes
  • Masters-of-sex-brave-new-world_home_top_story

    Review: 'Masters of Sex' - 'Brave New World'

    Type: Post | Date: Sunday, Nov 3, 2013

    Allison Janney is fantastic as Mrs. Scully turns to Masters and Johnson for help
  • Waltons: Complete Seasons 1 & 2

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Jan 5, 2010

    Includes:The Waltons: The Hunt (1972) The Waltons: The Carnival (1972) The Waltons: The Calf (1972) The Waltons: The Minstrel (1972) The Waltons: The Typewriter (1972) The Waltons: The Star (1972) The Waltons: The Boy From the C.C.C. (1972) The Waltons: The Ceremony (1972) The Waltons: The Legend (1972) The Waltons: The Dust Bowl Cousins (1972) The Waltons: The Reunion (1972) The Waltons: The Literary Man (1972) The Waltons: The Foundling (1972) The Waltons: The Sinner (1972) The Waltons: The Thanksgiving Story, Part 1 (1973) The Waltons: The Townie (1973) The Waltons: The Scholar (1973) The Waltons: An Easter Story, Part 1 (1973) The Waltons: The Love Story (1973) The Waltons: The Triangle (1973) The Waltons: The Thanksgiving Story, Part 2 (1973) The Waltons: An Easter Story, Part 2 (1973) The Waltons: The Actress (1973) The Waltons: The Fire (1973) The Waltons: The Gypsies (1973) The Waltons: The Deed (1973) The Waltons: The Bicycle (1973) The Waltons: The Journey (1973) The Waltons: The Odyssey (1973) The Waltons: The Separation (1973) The Waltons: The Roots (1973) The Waltons: The Chicken Thief (1973) The Waltons: The Braggart (1973) The Waltons: The Fawn (1973) The Waltons: The Air Mail Man (1973) The Waltons: The Bequest (1973) The Waltons: The Substitute (1973) The Waltons: The Prize (1973) The Waltons: The Theft (1973) The Waltons: The Courtship (1973) The Waltons: The Gift (1974) The Waltons: The Heritage (1974) The Waltons: The Five Foot Shelf (1974) The Waltons: The Graduation (1974) The Waltons: The Car (1974) The Waltons: The Cradle (1974) The Waltons: The Fulfillment (1974) The Waltons: The Ghost Story (1974) The Waltons: The Honeymoon (1974) The Waltons: The Awakening (1974) The Waltons: The Hunt In this episode from the first season of the long-running television series The Waltons, 16-year-old John-Boy (Richard Thomas) is deemed old enough to go hunting and he volunteers to join a turkey shoot. But John-Boy hates the idea of killing animals, and when a prize bird is in his rifle's sight, he finds that he can't pull the trigger. John-Boy is worried that his father (Ralph Waite) will think he's a coward, but soon John-Boy is given another opportunity to prove his bravery. Meanwhile, Mary-Ellen (Judy Norton-Taylor) has been saving her money to buy a baseball glove, but when G.W. Haines (David Doremus), a boy that she likes, begins spending his time with a pretty girl, Mary-Ellen wonders if she should buy a nice dress instead in hopes of winning back G.W.'s attentions. The Waltons: The Hunt first aired on October 5, 1972. ~ Mark Deming, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Carnival Olivia (Michael Learned) strongly disapproves when husband John (Ralph Waite) invites four travelling carnival performers (one of them played by legendary "little person" Billy Barty) to stay with the Walton family. The quartet of "carnies" had found themselves stranded after their manager skipped town with the carnival's profits. Ever so gradually, Olivia warms up to these curious but likeable nomads -- and when the four entertainers discover that the Waltons hadn't had enough money to attend their carnival when it first arrived on the Mountain, a very special performance is staged in the family's barn. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Calf Much to the dismay of the younger Walton children, their pet calf is sold for nine dollars to farmer George Anderson (Leonard Stone), who intends to slaughter the animal for its meat. John Walton (Ralph Waite) doesn't really want to break his kids' hearts, but facts are facts: a male calf is of no use on their farm, and the family needs that nine dollars to repair their truck. Ultimately, John weakens and tries to buy the calf back, only to have the canny Anderson increase the asking price -- thereby all but goading the Walton youngsters into becoming cattle thieves! ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Minstrel Feeling cut off from the outside world, Mary Ellen (Judy Norton-Taylor) is quite receptive to the attentions paid her by wandering folksinger Jamie (Peter Hooten), who has come to the Mountain in hopes of gleaning song material from elderly Maude Gormley (Merie Earle). Mary Ellen spends so much time with Jamie that she begins neglecting her family responsibilities, causing considerable friction between herself, her parents and her siblings. When Jamie rejects Mary Ellen as being "just a kid" and unworthy of his affections, the disillusioned girl is more determined than ever to escape her "repressive" surroundings--sparking another of those famous Walton family rallies to set things right. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Typewriter In this pivotal episode, budding writer John-Boy (Richard Thomas) is encouraged by his teacher Miss Hunter (Mariclare Costello) to send one of his stories to a national magazine. Unfortunately, the publication accepts only typed manuscripts, and John-Boy can't afford a typewriter. With no other options at hand, he secretly "borrows" an antique typewriter belonging to the wealthy Baldwin sisters (Helen Kleeb, Mary Jackson) -- only to find himself in quite a quandary when Mary Ellen (Judy Norton-Taylor) unwittingly gives the old machine to a travelling junk dealer (George Tobias). ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Star Virtually everyone on Walton's Mountain is profoundly affected when a meteorite falls through the Baldwin sisters' roof. Grandpa (Will Geer) in particular regards the falling star as a grim omen, perhaps of his own imminent demise. Meanwhile, the Baldwins' disreputable cousin Polonius (Iggie Wolfington) tries to capitalize on the astronomical phenomenon by insisting that the meteorite has been sent as warning to the ladies to stop brewing their special moonshine...and to hand their famous "recipe" over to him. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Boy From the C.C.C. This episode recalls the time when impoverished teenagers found employment (not always voluntarily) by working in the government-sponsored Civilian Conservation Corps. One such youngster is Gino (Michael Rupert), a hard-bitten New York slum kid. Running away from a C.C.C. camp near Walton's Mountain, Gino seeks temporary shelter by the Walton family. Unable to accept the family's kindness and generosity, Gino ends up stealing from his hosts. John Walton (Ralph Waite) is all for having Gino arrested until a crisis involving his daughter Elizabeth (Kami Cotler) opens John's eyes to the boy's essential decency. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Ceremony A family of Jewish refugees settles in a small cottage on Walton's Mountain. Terrified that the Nazi persecution that had forced them from their homeland has followed them to America, Professor David Mann (Noah Keen) warns his family not tell anyone that they are Jewish. Crestfallen that he will not be permitted to celebrate his Bar Mitzvah, Paul Mann (Radames Peras) loses all respect for his father--and it is up to the Waltons to convince the Manns that their dark days are past, and to reunite the Professor and his son. Featured as Eva Mann is Ellen Geer, the daughter of series regular Will Geer (Grandpa Walton). ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Legend John (Ralph Waite) is visited by his old Army buddy Tip Harrison (James Antonio), who regales the Walton family with stories of his colorful exploits during WW1. Unforutnately, Tip is so entrenched in the past that he finds it impossible to live in the present. His inability to "fit in" with his current surroundings results in a couple of near-tragedies, including a disastrous fire--for which Tip, terrified of losing John's friendship, allows one of the Walton boys to take the blame! ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Dust Bowl Cousins The Waltons pay host to their Kansas cousins, the Denbys, who have lost their farm to the ravages of the Dust Bowl. Unfortunately, the Denbys also seem to have lost their scruples, and before long they are taking undue advantage of the Waltons. Despite repeated assurances that he has some job prospects in Newport News , it is painfully obvious that Ham Denby (Warren Vanders) has no intention of moving either himself or his family from Walton's Mountain. This episode won the Director's Guild of America award for Robert Butler. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Reunion The Baldwin sisters are once again visited by one of their less reputable relatives. This time, their guest is cousin Homer (Denver Pyle), who hopes to persuade Miss Emily (Mary Jackson) and Miss Mamie (Helen Kleeb) to hold a Baldwin family reunion. In truth, however, Homer plans to use the occasion as a subterfuge, to get his grubby fingers on the sisters' secret moonshine recipe. Ultimately, the ladies realize that they've been hoodwinked--and worse still, none of their relatives is going to show up for their reunion. As John-Boy Walton (Richard Thomas) tries to help the Baldwins weather this crisis, his younger brother Jim-Bob (David W. Harper) has a problem of a different nature on his hands, involving a most unusual schoolyard bully. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Literary Man Globetrotting author A.J. Covington (David Huddleston) finds himself briefly stranded on Walton's Mountain. In answer to John-Boy's incessant questions on how to become a writer, Covington modestly advises him to "write what you know"--and, not so modestly, regales the boy with tales of his own adventures. Inevitably, John-Boy (Richard Thomas) begins spending far too much time conversing with Covington, neglecting his responsibilities at the Walton's lumberyard to the extent that the family may lose a lucrative (and sorely needed) timber contract.This episode won an Emmy Award for Best Cinematography. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Foundling The debut episode of The Waltons is set in 1933, with the Walton family of Virginia coping as best they can with the ravages of the Depression. The emphasis is on eldest Walton son John-Boy (Richard Thomas), who is struggling to communicate with a melancholy deaf girl named Holly (Erica Hunton), whose mother Ruth (Charlotte Stewart) had abandoned the girl on the Walton doorstep. Almost miraculously, John-Boy and his siblings are able to break through to Holly and teach her sign language. Unfortunately, while trying to convey the information that John-Boy's sister Elizabeth (Kami Cotler) has gotten locked in a trunk, Holly is intercepted by her father Anson (Richard Kelton), who, failing to understand the girl's wild gesticulations, takes her home, leaving poor Elizabeth to her fate! ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Sinner John Ritter makes his first appearance as Matthew Fordwick, the new minister on Walton's Mountain. No sooner has the sober, upright Rev. Fordwick arrived than he pays a visit to his distant relatives, the Baldwin sisters. Innocently consuming far too much of the Baldwins' special "recipe," the Reverend ends up making a drunken spectacle of himself. It is up to John Walton (Ralph Waite) -- who'd initally been offended by Fordwick's overbearing religious fervency -- to persuade the poor man not to leave the Mountain in disgrace. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Thanksgiving Story, Part 1 In the first half of a two-part story (originally telecast as a single two-hour episode), John-Boy (Richard Thomas) is afforded the opportunity to qualify for a scholarship at Boatwright University--and, as icing on the cake, his former girlfriend Jenny (Sian Barbara Allen) is paying a return visit to Walton's Mountain. But joy turns to despair when John-Boy is injured in an accident, which may render him permanently blind. Meanwhile, Jason (Jon Walmsley) is beginning to have second thoughts about accepting a job from the dithery Baldwin Sisters (Mary Jackson, Helen Kleeb). ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Townie In her first Waltons appearance, future Oscar winner Sissy Spacek) is cast as Sarah, the sheltered daughter of hyper-religious Widow Simmonds (Allyn Ann McLerie). In a desperate attempt to emerge from her shell, Sarah all but throws herself upon John-Boy (Richard Thomas). He gently resists her romantic overtures, whereupon Sarah takes up with a callow "townie" named Theodore Claypool Jr. (Nicholas Hammond]), the son of a wealthy businessman. Ultimately, Sarah and Theodore elope--and both her mother and his father hold John-Boy responsible for this catastrophe! ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Scholar Lynn Hamilton makes her first series appearance as Verdie Grant (Lynn Hamilton), one of the black residents of Walton's Mountain. Receiving word that her daughter is about to graduate from college, Verdie is reluctant to attend the ceremonies because she is unable to read or write, a secret she has always been too proud to reveal. John-Boy (Richard Thomas) offers to tutor Verdie on the condition that no one will ever find out about her illiteracy. The two work out a subterfuge whereby John-Boy will instruct Verdie while pretending to "play school" with his little sister Erin (Mary Elizabeth McDonough)--who reveals the truth at a critical juncture in the story. This episode earned an Emmy Award for scriptwriter John McGreevey. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: An Easter Story, Part 1 In the first half of The Waltons' two-part Season One finale (originally telecast as a single two-hour episode), Mary Ellen (Judy Norton-Taylor) nervously looks forward to her first Easter dance. But her anticpation of this momentous event is eclipsed by a potential tragedy in the Walton household: Olivia (Michael Learned) has been stricken with polio. Though Dr. Vance grimly predicts that Olivia will never walk again, John-Boy (Richard Thomas) refuses to give up hope, and embarks upon a curious odyssey in desperate search of a miracle. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Love Story Sian Barbara Allen makes her first series appearance as Jenny Pendleton, a runaway from her family in Richmond. Convinced that there is no room for her at home now that her widowed father (Gordon Rigsby) has remarried, Jenny hides out on a patch of her family's property on Walton's Mountain. It is here that the girl is found by John-Boy Walton (Richard Thomas)--who instantly falls in love with her and invites her to stay a while with his family. Luxuriating in the warmth and kindness of the Walton household, Jenny hopes to remain there permanently...but then tragedy intervenes. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Triangle John-Boy (Richard Thomas) develops a crush on his teacher Miss Hunter (Mariclare Costello), whom he regards as his literary inspiration. But when Reverend Fordwick (John Ritter]) begins courting Miss Hunter, the envious John-Boy may nip his writing career in the bud just out of spite! Meanwhile, brother Ben (Eric Scott) is likewise having "heart trouble", prompting him to go the body-building route (courtesy of a mail-order course) to impress the girl of his dreams. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Thanksgiving Story, Part 2 In the conclusion of a two-part story (originally telecast as a single two-part episode), John-Boy (Richard Thomas) refuses to reveal the seriousness of his accident, terrified that he will no longer qualify for a scholarship at Boatwright University. As John-Boy's eyesight grows weaker with each passing day, it is painfully obvious that the only way he can prevent permanent blindness is to undergo surgery. . .if it isn't already too late. Elsewhere, Olivia (Michael Learned) is outraged to discover that Jason (Jon Walsmley) has been dragooned into helping the Baldwin Sisters cook up their intoxicating "recipe"; and Ben (Eric Scott) and Grandpa (Will Geer) continue hunting for the family's Thanksgiving turkey. This episode earned an Emmy Award for scriptwriter Joanna Lee. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: An Easter Story, Part 2 In the conclusion of The Waltons' two-part Season One finale (originally telecast as a single two-hour episode), the outlook is bleak for Olivia Walton (Michael Learned), who has been stricken with polio and may never walk again. Refusing to accept this prognosis, John-Boy (Richard Thomas) puts his faith in a radical new medical procedure created by the legendary Sister Kenny. Meanwhile, Mary Ellen (Judy Norton-Taylor) tries to teach G.W. Haines (David Doremus) to dance in time for their Easter date; and Jason (Jon Walmsley) enters an amateur song contest with his own composition, "The Ironing Board Blues". "An Easter Story" was later released theatrically in Australia as the feature film A Walton Crisis. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Actress When her limousine breaks down on the Mountain, flamboyant Hollywood actress Alvira Drummond (Pippa Scott) accepts the hospitality of the Walton family. Not unexpectedly, Mary Ellen (Judy Norton-Taylor) is quite star-struck by the glamorous visitor--while Grandma Walton (Ellen Corby) dourly disapproves of Alvira's "fast" lifestyle , and is openly suspicious of the actress' claims that all her money and valuables have been stolen. Thanks to gossipy telephone operator Fanny Tatum (played here by Dorothy Neumann rather than Sheila Allen), a few inconvenient truths about the "fabulously successful" Alvira Drummond ultimately come to light. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Fire Walton's Mountain turns into a battleground over the teaching of Evolution. Lutie Bascomb (Richard Bradford), a hard-luck farmer whose violent temper has gotten worse since the breakup of his marriage, storms into the classroom of Miss Hunter (Mariclare Costello) and accuses her of "blasphemy" for explaining Darwin's theory to Lutie's daughter Lois Mae (Laurie Prange). The war of words reaches an ominous climax when Lutie threatens to kill Miss Hunter--and not long afterward, the schoolhouse is engulfed in flames! ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Gypsies Caught in a heavy rainstorm on Walton's Mountain, a family of Gypsies takes refuge it what seems to be a deserted house. Actually, it's the home of the Baldwin sisters, temporarily out of town. The Gypsies' unwitting "break-in" fuels the bigotry of Matt Beckwith (William Bramley), who tries to turn the other residents of the Mountain against the nomadic family. When the Waltons offer to lend a helping hand, the Gypsies are too proud to accept...even though their baby is gravely ill. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Deed Unable to produce the deed to their land, the Waltons are threatened with eviction from the mountain by a powerful lumber company. In order to raise the $200 necessary to register a deed, John (Ralph Waite) and John-Boy (Ralph Waite) head to the "big city", looking for work. Just when it seems that their troubles are over, the money is stolen by a pair of street bandits. An unhappy ending? Not THIS early in the nine-year TV run of The Waltons!. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Bicycle Using John-Boy (Richard Thomas) as a go-between, blacksmith Curtis Norton (Ned Beatty) carries on a long-distance courtship with city girl Ann Harris (Ivy Jones). Though John-Boy sees no harm in writing Curtis' love letters for the shy Smithy, his tendency to embellish the facts causes big problems when Ann pays a visit to Walton's Mountain. Meanwhile, Olivia (Michael Learned) begins fantasizing about an operatic career while bicycling to her weekly choir practice. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Journey The second season of The Waltons begins as the family's eldest son John-Boy (Richard Thomas) is torn between his own youthful desires and the more pressing needs of an elderly person. Octogenarian Maggie MacKenzie (Linda Watkins) is resolved to the fact that she isn't long for this world, but she refuses to give up the ghost until she is able to see the Atlantic Ocean one last time--the same Atlantic Ocean that had carried herself and her late husband from Scotland to America so many years ago. Pressed into service to transport Maggie to the seacoast is John-Boy, but he isn't happy about the assignment: Maggie's odyssey may well prevent him from attending a big dance with his erstwhile girlfriend Marsha (Tammi Bula). Series creator Earl Hamner Jr. briefly appears as Maggie's husband in a flashback sequence. This episode earned the Directors' Guild of America award for Harry Harris. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Odyssey Seeking solitude to write his stories, John-Boy (Richard Thomas) takes a hike into the mountains. But peace and quiet is not on his schedule when he comes across his friend Sarah Simmonds (Sissy Spacek in her second series appearance), who has run away from her husband--and who is very pregnant and very, very ill. This chance meeting occurs not long after an earlier encounter between John-Boy and elderly mountain dweller Granny Ketchum (Frances Williams), who in repayment for a favor had supplied him with a home-made medicinal potion. When Sarah downs the potion, she suddenly goes into labor...and John-Boy is the only person within miles who can help her! ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Separation The plot of this episode is sparked (no pun intended) by an overdue electric bill. In his efforts to raise the necessary funds, Grandpa Walton (Will Geer) becomes enmeshed in a situation that incurs the wrath of Grandma (Ellen Corby). This minor and rather silly misunderstanding escalates into a bitter quarrel--whereupon Grandpa and Grandma, too stubborn to admit their mistakes and reconcile their differences, may well be on the verge of a permanent split-up! This episode is based on a story by series regular Ellen Corby). ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Roots Hal Williams and Erin Blunt make their first series appearances as itinerant laborer Harley Foster and his son Jody. After a brief and tantalizing glimpse of family life at the Walton home, Jody begs his father to stop wandering and settle down. But the fiercely independent Harley prefers his nomadic existence, prompting Jody to take drastic action to get what he wants. All the while, Harley seems unaware that widow Verdie Grant (Lynn Hamilton) has set her cap for him--but he won't stay unaware for long! ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Chicken Thief John-Boy (Richard Thomas) catches his friend Yancy Tucker (Robert Donner) stealing chickens, but decides not to tell their sheriff. This may prove to be the wrong decision when chicken farmer Charlie Potter (Richard O'Brien) is shot--and Yancy is the only likely suspect. And speaking of thievery, Ben (Eric Scott) gets himself in hot water when he "borrows" one of John-Boy's old poems, "A Winter Mountain", to win a literary competition. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Braggart Orphan Hobie Shanks (Michael McGreevey), who years earlier had briefly stayed with the Waltons, returns to the Mountain brimming over with braggadocio. Everyone is impressed by Hobie's claim that he is about to be given a pitching tryout with a professional baseball team--everyone, that is, except the envious John-Boy (Richard Thomas), who thinks that Hobie is full of hot air. Surprisingly, it turns out that Hobie is telling the truth . . .but he may never get the chance to become a "pro" thanks to a freak accident. (Trivia note: guest star Michael McGreevey is the son of frequent Waltons scriptwriter John McGreevey--who, incidentally, did NOT write this episode). ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Fawn John-Boy (Richard Thomas) learns a few harsh and bitter life lessons when he accepts a job collecting debts for shifty absentee landlord Graham Foster (Charles Tyner). Meanwhile, John-Boy's sister Erin (Mary Elizabeth McDonough), feeling that her brother has let her down by aligning himself with Foster, shifts her affections to a wild fawn--and refuses to set the animal free, even when her family gets in trouble with the local authorities. This episode was directed by series regular Ralph Waite (John Walton). ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Air Mail Man Olivia's birthday party is interrupted by the forced landing of mail pilot Todd Cooper (Paul Michael Glaser) on Walton's Mountain. Putting their own concerns aside for the moment, the family pitches in to repair Todd's damaged plane--and, indirectly, to patch up his faltering relationship with his wife Sue (Julie Cobb). This done, everyone comes forth with a present for birthday girl Olivia (Michael Learned)...but Todd's present is the most impressive of all, and one that Olivia will never forget! ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Bequest Grandma Walton (Ellen Corby) is pleasantly surprised when she receives a huge bequest--a whole $250!--from a casual acquaintance. Naturally, everybody in the Walton household has a special plan on how best to spend the money, and just as naturally, Grandma intends to be generous with her windfall, not only doling it out to her family but to the rest of the community. But an unexpected development puts a damper on that generosity--and now Grandma is faced with the prospect of being unable to keep her word for the first time in her life. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Substitute While Miss Hunter (Mariclare Costello) is out of town on family business, her classroom is taken over by youthful substitute teacher Megan Pollard (Catherine Burns), a transplanted New Yorker. Though undeniably brilliant, Megan is incapable of "relating" to mountain folk, and before long her rigid, dictatorial teaching methods have alienated students and parents alike. Meanwhile, Grandpa resists the temptation to help Ben build a kite for a contest. This episode represents a reunion between series regular Richard Thomas and guest star Catherine Burns, who had previously costarred in the memorable "coming-of-age" film drama Last Summer (1969). ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Prize The Waltons attend the annual County Fair, where each family member hopes to win a prize. At the same time, Olivia's former beau Oscar Cockrell (Peter Donat) shows up at the fair in hopes of advancing his political career. Comparing Oscar's affluence with his own family's lack of same, John-Boy (Richard Thomas) asks himself how different his life would have been if Olivia (Michael Learned) had accepted Oscar's proposal. Meanwhile, a "special ingredient" in Olivia's cake has a curious effect on the contest judges! ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Theft John Walton (Ralph Waite) is accused of stealing some valuable silver goblets from wealthy neighbor Mrs. Claybourne (Diana Webster). Her evidence? Well, for starters, John is the only visitor that Mrs. Claybourne has had in weeks--and even more damning, he has suddenly and inexplicably come into a large sum of money. Too angry and proud to defend himself, John is on the verge of a lengthy jail term until the truth is revealed in a surprising fashion. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Courtship Having lost his job in Cincinnati, Olivia's 64-year-old uncle Cody Nelson (Eduard Franz) relocates to Walton's Mountain. Hoping to alleviate Cody's loneliness, John-Boy (Richard Thomas) tries to play matchmaker between his uncle and local resident Cordelia Hunnicutt (Danna Hansen). But Olivia and Grandma staunchly disapprove of this romance, labelling Cordelia as "unsuitable" for poor, innocent Cody--after all, the brazen woman has been married and divorced four times! ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Gift A post-Andy Griffith Show, pre-Happy Days Ron Howard) guest stars as Seth Turner, the best friend of Jason Walton (Jon Walmsley). Seth has always wanted to learn to play an instrument in his father's band, but it looks as if he won't have the time; he has been diagnosed with leukemia. The concept of death--and the unfairness of it all--is an extremely difficult one for Jason to accept, and it is up to Grandpa to help the boy through this crisis. Featured in the cast as Dr. McIvers is Ron Howard's father Rance Howard. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Heritage John (Ralph Waite) is torn between financial considerations and concern for his children's birthright when he is offered $25,000 for Walton's Mountain by a developer (Noah Beery Jr.) who wants to build a tourist resort. Of course, John needs the money--but does he need THAT much money? (A fine question to be asking oneself in the middle of a Depression!) Meanwhile, Grandpa (Will Geer) and Grandma (Ellen Corby) prepare for their Golden wedding anniversary. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Five Foot Shelf Feeling sorry for travelling book salesman George Reed (Ben Piazza), Olivia (Michael Learned) makes a sizeable deposit on the "Five-Foot Shelf" collection, consisting of fifty "Harvard Classics." When he finds out that Reed has spent the money to buy his little girl a doll, John (Ralph Waite) is outraged and orders the peddler off Walton's Mountain, never to return. But this doesn't answer the episode's burning question: Will Olivia pony up a second deposit when those fifty books are delivered to the Walton doorstep? ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Graduation The Walton family spends a great deal of money to purchase a new suit of clothes for John-Boy's high school graduation. But when their cow suddenly dies, the Waltons desperately need ready cash to replace the bovine. Will John-Boy (Richard Thomas) stubbornly hold on to his graduation suit, or will he do the Right Thing and sell it back? Without revealing the ending, it can be noted that Grandpa Walton (Will Geer) comes to the rescue. Featured in the supporting cast is child actor Jeff Cotler, the brother of series regular Kami Cotler (Elizabeth). ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Car Hoping to obtain an automobile before heading off to college, John-Boy (Richard Thomas) does repair work for neighbor Hyder Rudge (Ed Lauter) in exchange for Rudge's old car. But when time comes for John-Boy to collect, Rudge refuses to part with his car, and even pretends that he no longer owns the vehicle. It soon becomes obvious that Rudge has broken his word in a desperate effort to cling to his past...and to the memory of someone who will never return. This is the final episode of The Waltons' second season. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Cradle No sooner has Olivia (Michael Learned) taken a job as a door-to-door salesman to help make ends meet in the Walton home than she discovers she is pregnant...again. As John (Ralph Waite) wonders if the family can afford another child, his youngest daughter Elizabeth (Kami Cotler) makes no secret of her disappointment over being supplanted as the "baby" of the family. Ultimately, the family comes to accept what seems to be The Inevitable--and then an unexpected plot twist puts the situation in a whole new light. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Fulfillment Once again, the Waltons play host to blacksmith Curtis Norton and his city-bred bride Ann, characters introduced in the first-season episode "The Bicycle" (Ivy Jones returns as Ann, while Victor French takes over from Ned Beatty as Curtis). But the news the Nortons bring with them is far from good: they have been told that they can never have children. At the same time, embittered eight-year-old orphan Stevie (Tiger Williams) is also staying with the Waltons. In any other TV series, this situation would immediately culminate in a happy ending, with the Nortons adopting Stevie--but in this case, Ann Norton is none too keen about adopting anyone. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Ghost Story The Walton kids purchase a Ouija board from storekeeper Ike (Joe Conley), and immediately set about to contact the spirit world. Though Olivia (Michael Learned) and Grandma (Ellen Corby) regard this activity as diametrically opposed to their religious beliefs, the kids' friend Luke (Kristopher Marquis) hopes that the board will help him communicate with his deceased mother. Sure enough, an unseen force seems to be guiding the children's hands as they spell out an ominous message, warning Luke to cancel a planned train trip--and not long afterward, word arrives that the train has crashed! ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Honeymoon After 19 years of marriage, John (Ralph Waite) and Olivia (Michael Learned) are finally able to go on their honeymoon to Virginia Beach...or so they think. When they are forced to spend the money they'd saved for the trip on emergency repairs, the rest of the family pitches in to raise the cash all over again. Alas, even after the couple is on their way to the coast, disaster continues dogging their trail--and back home, things aren't going so well for John-Boy (Richard Thomas) either. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Awakening Although she is becoming increasingly infirm and hard of hearing, Grandma Walton (Ellen Corby) stubbornly refuses to see a doctor. Grandma's intractability is more or less mirrored by 14-year-old Mary Ellen Walton (Judy Norton-Taylor), who wakes up one morning determined never again to be treated like a child. Unfortunately, Mary Ellen's declaration of independence may have negative results when she falls in love with a much-older college boy (James Carroll Jordan). The episode's closing narration clues us in to what the future holds in store for Mary Ellen--information which completely contradicts what will actually occur in such later Waltons episodes and TV-movies like Mother's Day on Walton's Mountain! ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide
  • Night Court: The Complete Third Season

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Feb 23, 2010

    Includes:Night Court: Dad's First Date (1985) Night Court: Mac and Quon Le: No Reservations (1985) Night Court: Hello, Goodbye (1985) Night Court: Halloween, Too (1985) Night Court: The Hostage (1985) Night Court: Walk Away, Renee (1985) Night Court: The Wheels of Justice, Part 2 (1985) Night Court: The Wheels of Justice, Part 1 (1985) Night Court: Up On the Roof (1985) Night Court: Dan's Boss (1985) Night Court: Best of Friends (1985) Night Court: Dan's Escort (1986) Night Court: The Apartment (1986) Night Court: Hurricane, Part 2 (1986) Night Court: Hurricane, Part 1 (1986) Night Court: Flo's Retirement (1986) Night Court: Monkey Business? (1986) Night Court: Could This Be Magic? (1986) Night Court: Harry and Leon (1986) Night Court: The Night Off (1986) Night Court: The Mugger (1986) Night Court: Leon, We Hardly Knew Ye (1986) Night Court: Dad's First Date Christine (Markie Post) is both surprised and delighted when her widowed dad Jack (Eugene Roche) re-enters the dating scene after eight years of loneliness. Later on, however, Jack is hauled into court in the company of an prostitute--and while still surprised, Christine is far from delighted! The situation turns out to be both innocent and rather poignant, but not before Judge Harry (Harry Anderson) must wrestle with another case involving elderly nudists. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Night Court: Mac and Quon Le: No Reservations Quon Le (Denice Kumagai) hopes that her marriage to big-hearted Mac (Charlie Robinson) will enable her to finance a Vietnamese restaurant. But things turn sour when Mac's bigoted millionaire grandfather (Charles Lampkin) cuts him off without a cent. Bumper Robinson makes his first appearance as courtroom shoeshine specialist Leon. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Night Court: Hello, Goodbye Night Court begins its third season as Judge Harry T. Stone (Harry Anderson) and his staff resign themselves to the death of caustic, chain-smoking courtroom matron Selma Hacker (actress Selma Diamond had passed away a few months after shooting wrapped on Season Two). Taking things hardest is bailiff Bull (Richard Moll), who goes out on a drunken bender--only to be hauled back into court with a batch of bibulous circus performers. This episode marks the first appearance of Florence Halop as Selma's equally cranky replacement Florence Kleiner; as a bonus, Markie Post joins the cast in the previously recurring role of public defender Christine Sullivan, replacing Ellen Foley as Billie Young. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Night Court: Halloween, Too Harry falls for a dazzling young woman named Kimberly (Mary-Margaret Humes), who claims to be a genuine witch. A tabloid reporter (George Murdock) intends to make hay of this situation, leaving Harry in a most embarrassing predicament (so what else is new?) Meanwhile, Dan (John Larroquette) frantically searches for a costume to wear at Harry's annual Halloween bash. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Night Court: The Hostage Hauled into court for stealing electronic communication components, a man (Kenneth Tigar) claiming to be from the planet Saturn pulls out a gun and holds the courtroom hostage. This proves to be most inconvenient for Dan (John Larroquette), who has finally managed to line up a date with his latest object of affection Sheila (Leslie Bevis). Things get worse when the wrong person consumes the drugged meat intended to incapactite the self-proclaimed Saturnian. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Night Court: Walk Away, Renee Gentle giant Bull (Richard Moll) is hopelessly in love with an attractive young woman named Renee (Randee Heller). So euphoric is Bull that his coworkers haven't got the heart--or the guts--to tell him that Renee is--to put it as discreetly as possible--a "working woman." Will this be a Pretty Woman love-conquers-all situation, or is Bull riding for another fall? ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Night Court: The Wheels of Justice, Part 2 In the conclusion of a two-part story, Harry (Harry Anderson) has quit his job as Night Court judge, frustrated and disgusted by a municipal budget cut that has resulted in panic, hostility and tragedy. As the courtroom staffers try to lure Harry out of a seedy pool hall and back behind the bench, Harry's elderly replacement (Kenneth Tobey) drops dead in mid-sentence! Future Star Trek: The Next Generation regular Brent Spiner appears as the head of the Wheeler family, a collection of raucous rubes who may or may not be from West Viriginia. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Night Court: The Wheels of Justice, Part 1 In the first episode of a two-part story, the Night Court staff is cut off from their paychecks by a municipal budget crisis. This freeze could not have come at a worse time for Harry, who is trying to save a cleaning lady (Susan Ruttan) and her troubled son (Harold P. Pruett) from being tossed into the street by a nasty landlord (Charles Bouvier). Ultimately, tragedy strikes--and a frustrated Harry quits his job! This episode marks the first appearance of the Wheelers, a rambunctious family of indigents who claim to hail from West Virginia (future Star Trek: The Next Generation regular Brent Spiner is seen as Bob Wheeler). ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Night Court: Up On the Roof Harry (Harry Anderson) offers his chambers as a safe harbor for rock star Eddie Devon (Michael Ross), who during his six years of celebrity has been mercilessly besieged by a parisitic entourage, an opportunistic psychiatrist (Stuart Pankin), and a swarm of crazy fans. Alas, Eddie's short spurt of freedom doesn't last too long. By episode's end, a covey of fans have taken over the courtroom roof--and Eddie is trapped in the elevator shaft! ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Night Court: Dan's Boss Dwarf actor Daniel Frishman makes his first appearance as Dan's new boss Vincent Daniels, who makes up for his lack of height with a towering knowledge of legal matters--not to mention a mile-wide mean streak. Curiously, the more Vincent threatens to make Dan's life a living hell, the more Dan (John Larroquette) likes it! Meanwhile, court matron Flo (Florence Halop) is squired by a very strange gentleman. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Night Court: Best of Friends Macho man Dan (John Larroquette) looks forward to a reunion with his old college buddy Chip--and especially to the prospect of joining Chip in an old-fashioned "girl hunt." Though the original TV Guide listing for this episode did not indicate the reason that Dan was sorely disappointed when Chick arrived, the fact that the character was played by famed female impersonator Jim Bailey) rather gave the game away. And in case any further hints are needed, be it noted that Chip now prefers to be called Charlene. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Night Court: Dan's Escort To fatten his bank account, Dan (John Larroquette) moonlights as a professional escort for wealthy women. One of his clients (Barbara Cason) is so enraptured by Dan that she insists he accompany her home--and thence to her bedroom! Meanwhile, Harry (Harry Anderson) tries to help out when the newly-arrived wife of Russian émigré Yakov (Yakov Smirnoff) is arrested. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Night Court: The Apartment Dan (John Larroquette) is more put out than pleased when Harry (Harry Anderson) throws a surprise birthday party in his honor; it seems that the libidinous prosecutor has arranged a hot date in his own pad for midnight. Alas, it looks as though Dan will miss his romantic rendezvous, thanks to a series of unforeseen catastrophes. For starters, Christine (Markie Post) is locked in a box during a misfire magic trick; then, the family of Mac's (Charlie Robinson) Vietnamese bride Quon Le (Denice Kumagai) arrives with suicide on their minds; and finally, the stripper hired by Harry shows up at the same time as the social worker who is checking up on Harry's temporary foster son Leon (Bumper Robinson). ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Night Court: Hurricane, Part 2 In the conclusion of a two-part story, Hurricane Mel bears down upon New York City just as four very pregnant defendants simultaneously go into labor in Harry's courtroom. In the course of events, one of the mothers-to-be (played by action-film diva Pam Grier) decides it's about time to marry her baby's father, while Dan (John Larroquette) is pressed into service as an emergency obstetrician! And just to make things even more difficult, Harry (Harry Anderson) must deal with the trailer-trash excesses of the Wheeler family (headed by future Star Trek: The Next Generation costar Brent Spiner). Florence Halop makes her last appearance as court matron Florence Kleiner in this, the final episode of Night Court's third season. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Night Court: Hurricane, Part 1 In the first episode of a two-part story, New York City battens down in preparation for the arrival of Hurricane Mel. Several people end up being trapped in Harry's courtroom, with no supplies or utilities. Among those huddled together are four very pregnant defendants--not to mention those inimitable indigents, the Wheeler family from West Virginia! Former blaxploitation-film diva Pam Grier plays one of the moms-to-be, while future Star Trek: The Next Generation costar Brent Spiner repeats his role as Bob Wheeler. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Night Court: Flo's Retirement Florence (Florence Halop) has mixed feelings while celebrating her birthday, inasmuch as she has now reached the age of mandatory retirement. Surprised by this turn of events, Florence's coworkers plot and plan to keep her on the job--and nearly lose their own jobs in the process. This episode was designed to prepare viewers for the inevitable departure of costar Florence Halop, who was seriously ill at the time (she would pass away a few months later). ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Night Court: Monkey Business? Soft-hearted Bull (Richard Moll) risks contempt of court--and by extension, his job--when he takes a liking to a baby orangutan, brought into court as evidence. Rather than allow the simian to be subjected to scientific experimentation, Bull "liberates" it from the lab doctor (Alex Henteloff) in charge. Meanwhile, Dan (John Larroquette) romances a pretty lady (Patty Dworkin) who has lost her memory. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Night Court: Could This Be Magic? Comic magician Carl Ballantine (remember him as "Gruber" on McHale's Navy?) guest stars as The Fabulous Falconi, a childhood idol of Judge Harry T. Stone (Harry Anderson). Discovering that Falconi is broke and homeless, magic aficionado Harry hires the old prestidigator for a private performance in his apartment. Falconi returns the favor by making several things disappear--including most of Harry's valuables! ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Night Court: Harry and Leon Upon discovering that shoeshine boy Leon (Bumper Robinson) is an orphan who literally lives in the court building, kind-hearted Harry (Harry Anderson) considers taking the boy in as a foster son. This brings Harry face to face with brusque social worker Charlotte Lund (Margot Rose) for the first (but definitely not the last!) time. Somehow or other, an illegal pie-thrower is also worked into the proceedings. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Night Court: The Night Off While Harry (Harry Anderson) takes a night off, his replacement is the much-older Judge Robert Hirsch (Jeff Corey). This turns out to be a calamitous substitution: though Harry may be eccentric, Judge Hirsch proves to be downright certifiable. Before the night is over, the half-baked Hirsch has jailed public defender Christine (Markie Post) and prosecutor Dan (John Larroquette)--and replaced them with court matron Florence (Florence Halop) and resident derelict Phil (William Utay)! Future Evening Shade regular Michael Jeter shows up in a minor role. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Night Court: The Mugger In a classic example of the old adage "a Conservative is a Liberal who's been mugged", public defender Christine (Markie Post) sours on her job after being robbed and assaulted. Even worse, just as Christine is about to quit her post, the mugger comes back into her life, holding the courtroom hostage with a hand grenade! Meanwhile, Phil the Wino (William Utay) drives Dan (John Larroquette) crazy with a tantalizing stock tip. This episode was originally scheduled to air on January 23, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Night Court: Leon, We Hardly Knew Ye It had to happen: Harry's idol Mel Torme has shown up in the courtroom! Unfortunately, it looks as though Harry (Harry Anderson) will pass up the opportunity to meet the fabled Velvet Fog. It seems that he is bogged down with personal problems involving courtroom shoeshine boy Leon (Bumper Robinson), who has run away from his nerdy adoptive parents--and intends to move back in with Harry whether Social Services likes it or not. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide
  • Farscape: The Complete Series

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Nov 17, 2009

    Includes:Farscape: PK Tech Girl (1999) Farscape: That Old Black Magic (1999) Farscape: A Bug's Life (1999) Farscape: Til the Blood Runs Clear (1999) Farscape: Through the Looking Glass (1999) Farscape: Throne for a Loss (1999) Farscape: They've Got a Secret (1999) Farscape: The Flax (1999) Farscape: Thank God It's Friday...Again (1999) Farscape: Rhapsody in Blue (1999) Farscape: Premiere (1999) Farscape: Jeremiah Crichton (1999) Farscape: I, E.T. (1999) Farscape: Exodus from Genesis (1999) Farscape: Durka Returns (1999) Farscape: DNA Mad Scientist (1999) Farscape: Back and Back and Back to the Future (1999) Farscape: A Human Reaction (1999) Farscape: A Clockwork Nebari (2000) Farscape: Family Ties (2000) Farscape: Dream a Little Dream (2000) Farscape: My Three Crichtons (2000) Farscape: Mind the Baby (2000) Farscape: Look at the Princess, Part 1: A Kiss is But a Kiss (2000) Farscape: Liars, Guns and Money, Part 1: A Not So Simple Plan (2000) Farscape: Home on the Remains (2000) Farscape: Die Me, Dichotomy (2000) Farscape: Crackers Don't Matter (2000) Farscape: Bone to Be Wild (2000) Farscape: Beware of Dog (2000) Farscape: Liars, Guns and Money, Part 3: Plan B (2000) Farscape: Liars, Guns and Money, Part 2: With Friends Like These (2000) Farscape: Look at the Princess, Part 3: The Maltese Crichton (2000) Farscape: Look at the Princess, Part 2: I Do, I Think (2000) Farscape: Won't Get Fooled Again (2000) Farscape: Vitas Mortis (2000) Farscape: The Way We Weren't (2000) Farscape: The Ugly Truth (2000) Farscape: The Locket (2000) Farscape: The Hidden Memory (2000) Farscape: Taking the Stone (2000) Farscape: Picture If You Will (2000) Farscape: Out of Their Minds (2000) Farscape: Nerve (2000) Farscape: Eat Me (2001) Farscape: Green-Eyed Monster (2001) Farscape: Relativity (2001) Farscape: Scratch 'n' Sniff (2001) Farscape: Self-Inflicted Wounds, Part 1 - Could'a, Would'a, Should'a (2001) Farscape: Infinite Possibilities, Part 2: Icarus Abides (2001) Farscape: Self-Inflicted Wounds, Part 2 - Wait for the Wheel (2001) Farscape: ...Different Destinations (2001) Farscape: The Choice (2001) Farscape: Thanks for Sharing (2001) Farscape: Suns and Lovers (2001) Farscape: Season of Death (2001) Farscape: Revenging Angel (2001) Farscape: Incubator (2001) Farscape: Losing Time (2001) Farscape: Meltdown (2001) Farscape: Infinite Possibilities, Part 1:Daedalus Demands (2001) Farscape: Fractures (2001) Farscape: Crichton Kicks (2002) Farscape: Terra Firma (2002) Farscape: Kansas (2002) Farscape: Twice Shy (2002) Farscape: Unrealized Reality (2002) Farscape: Coup By Clam (2002) Farscape: A Prefect Murder (2002) Farscape: I Shrink, Therefore I Am (2002) Farscape: What Was Lost, Part 2: Resurrection (2002) Farscape: Into the Lion's Den, Part 2: Wolf in Sheep's Clothing (2002) Farscape: What Was Lost, Part 1: Sacrifice (2002) Farscape: Promises (2002) Farscape: Natural Election (2002) Farscape: Lava's a Many Splendored Thing (2002) Farscape: John Quixote (2002) Farscape: Into the Lion's Den, Part 1: Lambs to the Slaughter (2002) Farscape: I-Yensch, You-Yensch (2002) Farscape: Dog with Two Bones (2002) Farscape: Bringing Home the Beacon (2003) Farscape: A Constellation of Doubt (2003) Farscape: Bad Timing (2003) Farscape: We're So Screwed, Part 1: Fetal Attraction (2003) Farscape: We're So Screwed, Part 3: La Bomba (2003) Farscape: We're So Screwed, Part 2: Hot to Katratzi (2003) Farscape: Prayer (2003) Farscape: Mental as Anything (2003) Farscape: PK Tech Girl During their efforts to salvage the wreckage of infamous PeaceKeeper vessel Zelbinon, Moya's crew members come across the abandoned PK technician Gilina (Alyssa-Jane Cook). Aeryn (Claudia Black) experience the pangs of jealousy when Gilina evinces fondness for Crichton (Ben Browder)--But this dilemma is minor compared to the greater threat of the Sheyang scavenger team which hopes to claim Zelbinon for itself. Meanwhile, Rygel (Jonathan Hardy) experiences hellish flashbacks of the torture he endured at the hands of Zelbinon's Captain Durka (David Wheeler). The 7th Farscape episode filmed, "PK Tech Girl was the 5th to be shown, making its TV debut on April 16, 1999. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: That Old Black Magic While visiting a commerce planet, Crichton (Ben Browder) falls under the power of vampiric sorceror Maldis (Chris Haywood). Transported to a metaphysical limbo, Crichton ends up locked in gladitorial combat with his mortal enemy, Capt. Crais (Lani Tupu) It is up to Zhaan (Virginia Hey) to save Crichton and vanquish Maldis--but the personal price for her bravery may be more than she is willing to pay. "That Old Black Magic" originally aired on June 11, 1999. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: A Bug's Life To prevent a Marauder crew from taking over Moya, Crichton (Ben Browder) poses as a PeaceKeeper captain. But even if this subterfuge works, the crew may have no defense against a hyper-intelligent virus that has festered on the Marauder's ship. As the virus hops from one host body to the next, a trail of death and destruction is left in its wake. "A Bug's Life" made its first U.S. television appearance on September 17, 1999. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Til the Blood Runs Clear In their efforts to create a prototype wormhole, Crichton (Ben Browder) and Aeryn (Claudia Black) inadvertently damages the Farscape 1 module. Landing on the Dambaba Depot for repairs, the two crew members run afoul of the Bloodtracker, bounty hunters hired by PeaceKeeper captain Crais to recapture Zhaan (Virginia Hey), D'Argo (Anthony Simcoe), and Rydel (Jonathan Hardy). Despite the imminent danger, Zhaan finds time to revel in the euphoria of solar flares. "Til the Blood Runs Clear" originally aired on July 9, 1999. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Through the Looking Glass Moya's erratic and unpredictable behavior can mean only one thing: The huge, living starship is pregnant. In her efforts to put the crew's mind at ease about her condition, Moya ends up stranding them in a nightmarish limbo. As Crichton (Ben Browder) attempts to repair the damage with some interdimensional surgery, his fellow crew members seem to evaporate before his eyes -- while Moya is multiplied by four. "Through the Looking Glass" originally aired on September 10, 1999. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Throne for a Loss During a standard commerce exchange, the duplicitous Dominar Rygel XVI (Jonathan Hardy) steals an important component of Moya -- only to be "stolen" himself by a band of Tavlek pirates. More out of concern for the component than for Rygel, crew members Crichton (Ben Browder), Aeryn (Claudia Black), and D'Argo (Anthony Simcoe) formulate a rescue plan. Unfortunately, the Tavlek have the added advantage of an adrenalin-enhancing drug -- which, in turn, has bizarre side effects on Moya's crew. "Throne for a Loss" originally aired on April 9, 1999. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: They've Got a Secret D'Argo (Anthony Simcoe) manages to destroy one of the few remaining PeaceKeeper devices on the living starship Moya -- only to cause an inexplicable reaction which blows him into space. Rescued by Aeryn (Claudia Black), D'Argo returns to Moya in a highly agitated and extremely paranoid state, convinced that fellow crew member Crichton (Ben Browder) is a murderer. Adding to this burden, Moya begins to malfunction in a terrifying fashion. "They've Got a Secret" first aired on June 25, 1999. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: The Flax Aeryn (Claudia Black) and Crichton (Ben Browder) are trapped in the Flax, an energy net controlled by space pirates. Zhaan (Virginia Hey) and Rygel (Jonathan Hardy) try to bargain for the return of their comrades without resorting to violence. It turns out that only D'Argo (Anthony Simcoe) will be able to rescue Moya's crew -- but he may bypass this opportunity and abandon his friends in favor of returning to his homeworld. "The Flax" was first telecast on July 16, 1999. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Thank God It's Friday...Again Moya's crew bids a reluctant farewell to D'Argo (Anthony Simcoe), who has elected to stay behind on the Utopian planet Sykar. But there is something very strange about this so-called paradise. For one thing, the entirely population's well-being seems to hinge upon a strange root called Tannot; for another, there is literally no "tomorrow" on Sykar's calender. Things get stranger still when a series of bizarre physical and mental changes manifest themselves within three of the crew members. "Thank God It's Friday...Again" first aired on April 23, 1999. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Rhapsody in Blue Moya and her crew are lured to a Delvian Colony by a false distress call. It turns out that they have been summoned on behalf of ailing Delvian ruler Tahleen (Kate Raison), whose life can be saved only by one of her own lineage -- namely, Princess Zhaan (Virginia Hey). In her efforts to do her royal duty, Zhaan goes insane, and her madness spreads to the rest of the crew. To rescue his comrades, and to prevent Tahleen from irretrievably capturing Zhaan's soul, Crichton (Ben Browder) must participate in Unity, a dangerous Delvian ritual. "Rhapsody in Blue" first aired on July 23, 1999. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Premiere While testing an experimental spacecraft, Commander John Crichton (Ben Browder) is pulled through a wormhole and literally sucked into the middle of a raging conflict in another galaxy thousands of light years from earth. Ending up on Moya, a living starship designed to transport the alien prisoners of the mercenary human PeaceKeepers, Crichton is forced to join a crew comprised of prison escapees, including anarchistic Delvian princess Pa'u Zotoh Zhaan (Virginia Hey), hostile Luxan warrior Ka D'Argo (Anthony Simcoe), and exiled Hynerian despot Dominar Rygel XVI (Jonathan Hardy). Also on board Moya is renegade PeaceKeeper Aeryn Sun (Claudia Black), who can no longer return to their own people. In hot pursuit of the escapees is PeaceKeeper Captain Bialar Crais (Lani Tupu), who also seeks vengeance against Crichton for inadvertently killing Crais' brother. With this 90-minute premiere episode, the weekly saga of Farscape began on March 19, 1999. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Jeremiah Crichton Thanks to another of Moya's unexpected starbursts, Crichton (Ben Browder) is stranded in space while riding Farscape 1. Entering into the energy pull of the earthlike planet Acquira, Crichton at first enjoys his new home so much that he is reluctant to leave. By the time he realizes that Acquira is no paradise, Crichton's fellow crew members, D'Argo (Anthony Simcoe) and Rygel (Jonathan Hardy), have landed on the planet, where, as a result of a misunderstanding, Rygel is hailed as the long-anticipated Acquiran savior. Alas, if the locals find out who he really is, Rygel will be executed -- as will the rest of Moya's crew. "Jeremiah Crichton" first aired on July 30, 1999. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: I, E.T. The crew makes the disturbing discovery that the PeaceKeepers have planted a locator beacon -- or tracking device -- somewhere on the living starship Moya. It is now necessary to perform surgery on the vessel, but the only practical anesthetic is located on a hostile planet that has never experienced extraterrestrial contact. In his efforts to obtain the anesthetic, Crichton realizes anew that he is truly a stranger in a strange land. The second Farscape episode filmed, "I, E.T." was the seventh to be shown, making its broadcast bow on May 7, 1999. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Exodus from Genesis Still escaping from the PeaceKeepers, the living starship Moya and her crew are shielded from detection by an instellar phenomenon, the handiwork of an insectoid race called the Drak. Partly out of necessity, partly out of gratitude, the crew agrees to protect the Drak queen during her spawning period. Unfortunately, the queen can only deposit her eggs under extremely high temperatures -- so high that they may prove fatal to renegade PeaceKeeper Aeryn Sun (Claudia Black). The third filmed episode of Farscape, "Exodus From Genesis" was the second episode to be broadcast, on March 26, 1999. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Durka Returns A damaged ship belonging to the powerful, pacifistic Nebari race is brought aboard Moya for repairs. One of the passengers is the infamous Captain Durka (David Wheeler), who had earlier overseen the fiendish torture of Rygel (Jonathan Hardy), but who now claims to be totally purged of his evil ways. Another passenger is the criminal Chiana, who falls under suspicion when her Nebari captor is murdered -- a killing that also causes the "reformed" Durka to revert to his nasty old self. Gigi Edgley makes her first Farscape appearance as Chiana in this episode, which originally aired on August 13, 1999. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: DNA Mad Scientist Alien scientist NamTar (enacted by Adrian Getley, with voice provided by Julian Gartner) offers to show Zhaan (Virginia Hey), D'Argo (Anthony Simcoe), and Rygel (Jonathan Hardy) the way back to their various homeworlds. In exchange, NamTar demands one of Pilot's arms. At first agreeable, the three crew members uncontrollably lapse into blatant hostility and greed -- while Aeryn (Claudia Black) learns the hard way that NamTar has a hidden agenda. "DNA Mad Scientist" was first telecast on June 18, 1999. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Back and Back and Back to the Future When he rescues two Ilanic scientists, D'Argo (Anthony Simcoe) causes dissension in the ranks of Moya's crew. Worse still, a female lifeform from the Ilanic shuttle causes Crichton (Ben Browder) to behave in a dangerous and irrational manner. Experiencing horrific flash images of the future, Crichton must endure this hellish mental glitch over and over and over again -- perhaps for all time. The fifth episode of Farscape to be filmed, "Back and Back and Back to the Future" was the third episode shown, making its broadcast debut on April 2, 1999. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: A Human Reaction John Crichton (Ben Browder) manages to pass through a wormhole in space, returning to what appears to be his native Australia. Curiously, he is given a chilly and hostile reception -- in fact, only John's father (Kent McCord) believes that Crichton really is Crichton. Also pulled through the wormhole are Aeryn (Claudia Black), D'Argo (Anthony Simcoe), and Rygel (Jonathan Hardy), who immediately upon their arrival are subjected to imprisonment and sadistic persecution. When Rygel is apparently killed and dissected, Crichton is forced to rethink his priorities -- and to confess his true feelings for Aeryn. "A Human Reaction" first aired on August 20, 1999. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: A Clockwork Nebari Moya and her crew knew that someday, somehow, the past of Nebari criminal Chiana (Gigi Edgley) would catch up to her. But when this inevitability finally occurs, the truth of the matter startles everyone. But that's nothing compared to actions of the Nebari who've arrived to "collect" Chiana -- and who also subject the crew to a radical mind-cleansing, robbing them of their free will. What do the Nebari really have in store for Chiana, Moya, and the universe? "A Clockwork Nebari" was first broadcast on September 11, 2000. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Family Ties Armed with new star charts from the botanist Br'nee (introduced in the previous episode "Bone to Be Wild"), Moya and her crew try to slip past the PeaceKeepers unnoticed, but to no avail. As Rygel (Jonathan Hardy) evinces a willingness to sell out his fellow crew members to regain his royal power, PK captain Crais (Lani Tupu) is ousted by his superiors and the hybrid Scorpius (Wayne Pygram) is installed in his place. Moya, her new infant starship, and the crew members (even the duplicitous Rygel) continue to formulate escape plans, but the situation remains unresolved by the end of the episode. First broadcast January 28, 2000, "Family Ties" served as the traditional cliffhanger ending for season one of Farscape. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Dream a Little Dream This episode of Farscape was originally presented out of chronological sequence, the explanation being that too much had occurred elsewhere in the saga to permit any earlier telecast. It is now 15 days after the destruction of the PeaceKeeper Gammak Base where Crichton (Ben Browder) had been held prisoner. Zhaan (Virginia Hey) fills Crichton in as to what has happened to Moya and her crew during his absence, including a legal imbroglio on the planet Litigara, where, arrested for a minor jaywalking charge, Zhaan ended up being charged for murder. It was up to Rygel (Jonathan Hardy) and Chiana (Gigi Edgley) to save their fellow crew member before Moya was forced to leave Litigara's orbital field. Alternately known as "Dream a Little Dream" and "Re:Union," this episode first aired on June 23, 2000. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: My Three Crichtons John Crichton (Ben Browder) is multiplied by three when an alien attempts to get hold of a sample human. In order to save Moya, the crew must sacrifice one of the Crichtons. But will the expendable one be a mere duplicate, or the genuine article -- and in the event of the second alternative, is the crew willing to give up its longtime comrade? "My Three Crichtons" made its first American TV appearance on July 14, 2000. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Mind the Baby Season two of Farscape was launched with a recap of the unresolved situation which climaxed season one. Only four passengers have managed to stay on board the besieged living starship Moya, with the rest all lost somewhere in an asteroid field. The crew members are forced into an uneasy alliance with recently deposed PeaceKeeper captain Crais (Lani Tupu), who is now himself a fugitive from the relentless PKs. Meanwhile, the newly named infant starship Talyn prepares to nominate his own captain -- making what may be the worst possible choice under the present circumstances. "Mind the Baby" first aired on March 17, 2000. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Look at the Princess, Part 1: A Kiss is But a Kiss In this first episode of the three-part story "Look at the Princess," the crew lands on the Royal Planet, one of the Breakaway Colonies that has declared independence from the PeaceKeepers. In order to save the rest of the crew from an unpleasant fate, Crichton (Ben Browder) must agree to wed the planet's Princess Katralla (Felicity Price). No matter what his decision, Crichton may never make it to the altar -- not if PK captain Scorpius (Wayne Pygram) has anything to say about the matter. "A Kiss Is But a Kiss" first aired on July 21, 2000. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Liars, Guns and Money, Part 1: A Not So Simple Plan In this first episode of the three-part story "Liars, Guns and Money," Crichton's former cellmate Stark (Paul Goddard) begs the crew to help him rob a Shadow Depository (aka a space bank) so that he can ransom D'Argo's son, Jothee (Matthew Newton), from slave traders. Unfortunately, the Depository's best customer turns out to be the crew's old PeaceKeeper nemesis Scorpius (Wayne Pygram), who has entered into a sinister conspiracy with Depository owner Natira (Claudia Karvan). Further problems arise when the Scorpius Neural Clone, previous implanted in the brain of Crichton (Ben Browder), is suddenly activated. "A Not-So Simple Plan" originally aired on January 5, 2001. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Home on the Remains In search of much-needed food and water, Chiana (Gigi Edgley) leads Moya's crew to the enormous carcass of an old Leviathan, and therein to a mining colony. Unfortunately, she has already made far too many enemies within the colony to ensure the safety of the crew members. Meanwhile, the starving Zhaan (Virginia Hey) begins metamorphosing into a plant life form which may prove fatally allergic to Moya. "Home on the Remains" originally aired on June 16, 2000. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Die Me, Dichotomy John Crichton (Ben Browder) has finally been rescued from Scorpius (Ben Browder), but not without great cost. Crichton is still suffering the after-effects of the Neural Clone implanted in his brain, while living starship Moya has been severely damaged by a drexan vapor. The starship's crew bring both Crichton and Moya to a medical facility, hoping to make repairs and continue their escape through space. Alas, Crichton, no longer in control of his own senses, has tipped Scorpius off as to the crew's location. As Crichton risks death to relieve the contradictory pressure on his brain, his fellow crew member (and lover) Aeryn (Claudia Black) apparently drowns before everyone's startled eyes. The obligatory cliffhanger climax for season two of Farscape, "Die Me, Dichotomy" was originally telecast on January 26, 2001. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Crackers Don't Matter In exchange for safe conduct to his own world, blind scientist T'raltixx (Danny Adcock) offers to provide the living starship Moya with a cloaking shield. Unfortunately, during the modifications necessary to set up the shield, something goes wrong, and as result the crew's emotionalism is heightened to a ridiculous degree. The situation worsens when the crew declares an all-out war over possession of Moya's cracker supply! "Crackers Don't Matter" first aired on April 7, 2000. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Bone to Be Wild Answering a distress call from a volatile asteroid field, Moya and her crew land on an unusually fertile world. Here they come across two residents with radically contradicting stories: M'Lee (Francesca Buller), who had sent the distress signal, claiming to have witnessed the massacre of her family, and botanist Br'nee (Marton Csokas), who insists that M'lee herself was responsible for the slaughter. Meanwhile, Aeryn bonds with Moya's "baby," an infant starship which may or may not align itself with the dreaded PeaceKeepers. "Bone to Be Wild" first aired on January 21, 2000. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Beware of Dog While stopping over at a commerce planet, Moya and her crew pick up a dangerous parasite. Chiana (Gigi Edgley) purchases a small and supposedly benign creature called a Vorc to track down and eliminate the unwelcome "visitor." But the Vorc turns out to be of a deadlier breed than expected -- and still worse, D'Argo (Anthony Simcoe) has been poisoned by the bite of a still-unidentified hideous beast. "Beware of Dog" was originally broadcast on August 11, 2000. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Liars, Guns and Money, Part 3: Plan B In this third episode of the three-part story "Liars, Guns and Money," Moya and her crew shift their rescue efforts from D'Argo's son Jothee (Matt Newton) to John Crichton (Ben Browder), who is in the clutches of Scorpius (Ben Browder), with his free will crippled by the implanted Neural Clone. Crichton ends up as the bone of contention between Scorpius and duplicitous Shadow Depository owner Natira (Claudia Karvan), who has some mysterious plans of her own. The Moya crew receives help from a surprising -- and initially very, very reluctant -- source. "Plan B" first aired on January 19, 2001. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Liars, Guns and Money, Part 2: With Friends Like These In this second episode of the three-part story "Liars, Guns and Money," Jothee (Matt Newton), son of D'Argo (Anthony Simcoe), is purchased by Scorpius (Wayne Pygram) at the slave auction. To rescue Jothee, Moya and her crew must retrace every incident that they've experienced in the Unchartered Territories. Exacerbating the situation, the boranium ingots stolen from the Shadow Depository turn out to be carrying deadly parasites, causing potential fatal problems in Moya's inner workings -- and the cure may be far worse than the ailment. "With Friends Like These" first aired on January 12, 2001. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Look at the Princess, Part 3: The Maltese Crichton In this final episode of the three-part story "Look at the Princess," Crichton (Ben Browder) has been transformed into a statue -- and his head has been removed. Elsewhere on the Royal Planet, Aeryn (Claudia Black) finds her priorities shifting in favor of a new man in her life. And the murder of Prince Clavor, the brother of Crichton's "fiancée" Katralla (Felicity Price), may spell doom for Moya and the crew unless a rapidly weakening Zhaan (Virginia Hey) can come to the rescue. "The Maltese Crichton" originally aired on August 4, 2000. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Look at the Princess, Part 2: I Do, I Think In this second episode of the three-part story "Look at the Princess," Crichton (Ben Browder) is still slated to wed Katralla (Felicity Price) of the Royal Planet. If he doesn't go through with the wedding, the consequences will be fatal for Moya and the crew -- and if he does, he faces the prospect of being transformed into a statue for the next 80 cycles. Meanwhile, Jena (Bianca Chiminello), fiancée of Katralla's brother Prince Klavor (Felix Williamson), reveals herself to be a PeaceKeeper assassin. "I Do, I Think" first aired on July 28, 2000. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Won't Get Fooled Again Crichton awakens to find himself in a hospital bed back on earth. Those attending him assure Crichton that everything he experienced on the Moya was nothing more than a dream. But having previously been hoodwinked into believing he had returned home, Crichton remains on his guard, especially when confronting a number of "strangers" who bear startling resemblances to his fellow crew members (for example, that nurse who calls herself Bettina Fairchild is the spitting image of Crichton's PK sweetheart Aeryn). "Won't Get Fooled Again" was originally telecast on August 18, 2000. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Vitas Mortis D'Argo (Anthony Simcoe) rushes to the side of legendary Luxan priestess Nilaam (Melissa Jaffer), who, on the verge of death, announces her intention to go through the Ritual of Passing. Instead, Nilaam performs the Ritual of Renewal, drawing from D'Argo's strength to rejuvenate herself as a young and powerful woman (now played by Anna Lise Phillips). As a result of this phenomenon, the living starship Moya suddenly grows old and infirm -- and Chiana (Gigi Edgley) is trapped in Moya's amnexus fluid, which is rapidly aging into solid, frozen form. "Vitas Mortis" originally aired on March 24, 2000. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: The Way We Weren't An old PeaceKeeper surveillance recording offers proof that an all-female Pleisar Regiment was responsible for the murder of Moya's original Pilot. Even worse, among the members of the regiment was current Moya crew member Aeryn (Claudia Black), who claims to have no memory of the killing. It is up to Crichton (Ben Browder) to probe Aeryn's subconscious and find out the truth before his outraged fellow crew members turn into a lynch mob. Alternately titled "The Way We Weren't" and "Forgive and Forget," this episode was first broadcast on April 14, 2000. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: The Ugly Truth Crais (Lani Tupu) solicits the aid of the Moya crew in modifying the defenses of Moya's infant starship, Talyn. Unfortunately, one of the "new and improved" weapons destroys a Plokavian vessel, whereupon everyone on Moya and Talyn is placed under arrest. Unless the crew members identify the person responsible for the tragic misfire, all will be executed -- a situation leading to a Rashomon climax, in which each interrogation reveals an entirely different version of the events leading to the disaster. "The Ugly Truth" originally aired on September 8, 2000. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: The Locket Stark (Paul Goddard), the man with whom Crichton (Ben Browder) had been imprisoned on the PK Gammak Base, arrives on Moya pursuing a mysterious new mission. Later, Aeryn (Claudia Black) is stranded in space during a reconnaisance mission -- and when Crichton goes to her rescue, he is likewise marooned. Worse still, Crichton is tormented by disturbingly lifelike images of his mortal enemy Scorpius. The one remaining question: Is all of this really happening, or is someone's imagination running amok? "The Locket" first aired on August 25, 2000. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: The Hidden Memory In this conclusion of the two-part story inaugurated in the previous episode "Nerve," John Crichton is still trapped on the PK Gammak base, where he is bickered over by hybrid scientist Scorpius (Wayne Pygram), who wants possession of John's mind, and PK officer Crais (Lani Tupu), who is determined to destroy John's body. Though not yet recovered from her stab wound, Aeryn (Claudia Black) joins D'Argo (Anthony Simcoe) and Zhaan (Virginia Hey) in a desperate attempt to rescue Crichton. Meanwhile, with Chiana (Gigi Edgley) in attendance, the living starship Moya finally gives birth -- resulting in some truly unforeseen complications. "The Hidden Memory" was originally broadcast on January 14, 2000. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Taking the Stone Seeking solace after learning of the death of her brother, Chiana (Gigi Edgley) borrows Aeryn's power system and speeds off to the Royal Cemetary Planet. Here Chiana forms a bond with the Clansmen, a underground community of teens and young adults who sustain themselves with drugs and hedonism. Aeryn (Claudia Black) and Crichton (Ben Browder) are willing to respect Chiana's efforts to assuage her grief, but Rygel (Jonathan Hardy) tries to profit from the girl's plight by plundering the Cemetary Planet's tombs -- with horrifying results. "Taking the Stone" was first broadcast on March 31, 2000. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Picture If You Will While shopping on a commerce ship owned by an alien named Kyvan (Chris Haywood), Chiana (Gigi Edgley) comes across a portrait which possesses the ability to foretell the future. What she sees she doesn't like; it appears that the vampiric sorcerer Maldis (also known as Kyvan, and also played by Chris Haywood) has sinister plans for Moya's crew -- perhaps eternal enslavement, perhaps death. It falls to Zhaan (Virginia Hey) to overcome a roadblock in her own mental makeup in order to defeat the malevolent Maldis. "Picture If You Will" was originally telecast on April 21, 2000. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Out of Their Minds After being attacked by a Halosian ship, everyone in Moya's crew is "knocked" into the next available body. The intellect and personality of Pilot (Lani Tupu) ends up in the body of Chiana (Gigi Edgley), D'Argo (Anthony Simcoe) is shifted to Pilot's body, Crichton (Ben Browder) finds himself in Aeryn's body, Aeryn (Claudia Black) in Rygel's, and Rygel (Jonathan Hardy) in Crichton's. This personality transference becomes even more confusing when the crew members try to defend Moya while being trapped in their new unfamiliar selves. Meanwhile, Zhaan (Virginia Hey), held prisoner by the Halosians, desperately tries to hold her captors at bay. "Out of Their Minds" originally aired on July 7, 2000. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Nerve In this first episode of a pivotal two-part Farscape story, Aeryn has suffered stab wounds, requiring an emergency tissue graft. To expedite this operation, Crichton (Ben Browder) disguises himself as a PeaceKeeper captain, and in the company of Chiana (Gigi Edgley) he infiltrates the PK's Gammak Base. Upon his arrival, Crichton again crosses the path of sympathetic PK tech girl Gilliana (Alyssa-Jane Cook) -- and also makes first contact with the evil hybrid scientist, Scorpius (Wayne Pygram). The climax finds Crichton subjected to the Aurora Chair, which opens the floodgates of his memory -- a potentially disastrous turn of events for Moya and her crew. Originally telecast January 7, 2000, "Nerve" was followed one week later by the concluding chapter "The Hidden Memory." ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Eat Me Accidently damaging the transport pod, Jool (Tammy MacIntosh) is forced along with D'Argo (Anthony Simcoe) and Chiana (Gigi Edgely) to land on a seriously ill leviathan (a living starship like Moya). Though the vessel may be in its death throes, it isn't as abandoned as it seems, much to the horror of the three crew members -- especially D'Argo. Meanwhile, a starburst from Moya thrusts Aeryn (Claudia Black) onto the deck of Moya's "baby" starship Talyn, which is also ailing and in agony. "Eat Me" first aired on April 20, 2001. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Green-Eyed Monster The living starship Talyn is swallowed and trapped in the gullet of an enormous budong -- an ordeal that no previous starship (or space traveller, for that matter) has ever survived. The crew tries to save Talyn, but is hampered by jealousy and suspicion within the ranks. Then Stark (Paul Goddard) hatches another wild scheme to rescue both Talyn and the crew -- a scheme which may literally blow up in everyone's faces. "Green-Eyed Monster" originally aired on June 22, 2001. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Relativity The Retrieval Squad poses a new threat to the recuperating starship Talyn. Aeryn (Claudia Black) has a traumatic reunion with her supremely judgmental mother, Xhalax Sun (Linda Cropper). And Crichton (Ben Browder) and Crais (Lani Tupu) must rely on their wits -- and more problematically, on each other -- to survive a trek through a jungle planet. "Relativity" made its first American TV appearance on June 6, 2001. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Scratch 'n' Sniff The overworked Chiana (Gigi Edgley) and Jool (Tammy MacIntosh) need a break from their duties, while Pilot needs relief from the ceaseless arguments between Crichton (Ben Browder) and D'Argo (Anthony Simcoe). There is nothing else to do but to seek out a brief respite on the pleasure planet LoMo. Predictably, however, the crew experiences precious little pleasure, thanks to a dangerously addictive (or, rather, seductive) drug called Freslin. "Scratch 'n' Sniff" originally aired on July 20, 2001. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Self-Inflicted Wounds, Part 1 - Could'a, Would'a, Should'a In this first episode of the two-part story "Self-Inflicted Wounds," Moya, following directions provided by Crichton (Ben Browder) heads to a planet where the ailing Zhaan (Virginia Hey) might be healed. En route, Moya collides with another living starship, the Pathfinder, whereupon both vessels are fused together. The two ships attempt to extricate themselves from one another -- with possibly fatal consequences for Moya and Pilot -- while Rygel (Jonathan Hardy) inadvertently revives the last surviving member of the Interon race from frozen statis. That survivor is the brilliant, fiery-tempered, shrill-voiced Jool (Tammy McIntosh), making her first Farscape appearance. "Could'a, Would'a, Should'a" originally aired on March 30, 2001. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Infinite Possibilities, Part 2: Icarus Abides In this second episode of the two-part story "Infinite Possibilities," Cmdr. Crichton (Ben Browder) faces danger from three fronts: the mercurial Scorpius clone "Harvey" imbedded in his brain, the fearsome Charrid sentinels on planet Dam-Ba-Da, and the impending attack of a Scarran dreadnought. Crisis piles upon crisis as the crew members on Dam-Ba-Da face betrayal at the hands of someone within their ranks, while those crewpersons still on the living starship Talyn are unable to utilize the hardware necessary to prevent unwelcome visitors from "dropping in." "Icarus Abides" first aired on August 3, 2001. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Self-Inflicted Wounds, Part 2 - Wait for the Wheel In this second episode of the two-part story "Self-Inflicted Wounds," Crichton (Ben Browder) finds that he has been played for a fool by duplicitous aliens -- and the results may prove fatal to Moya and her crew. Previously hostile toward Crichton, the recently revived Interon Jool (Tammy MacIntosh) joins her former enemy in his efforts to save Moya. Meanwhile, the ailing Zhaan finally pays the ultimate price for her many acts of self-sacrifice. Virginia Hey (Zhaan) makes her final Farscape appearance in "Wait for the Wheel," which originally aired on April 6, 2001. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: ...Different Destinations Moya and her crew make a rest stop at a remote planet in hopes of getting over the death of Zhaan. Upon arrival, Stark (Paul Goddard) passes through a hole in time, thrusting himself and the crew back to a famous Alamo-like battle between the PeaceKeepers and the Venek at an old monastery fortress. Here, the participants learn a surprising fact about the supposedly evil PeaceKeepers -- but in so doing, they may end up altering history, with devastating effects on billions of future lives. "...Different Destinations" was first broadcast on April 13, 2001. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: The Choice It looks as though Crichton (Ben Browder) is dead -- or, at least, the more preferable of Crichton's two separate identities has died. A grieving Aeryn (Claudia Black) heads to Valldon, a planet of mystics, hoping to find a means of communicating with Crichton's spirit. Meanwhile, Crais' (Lani Tupu) past misdeeds as a PeaceKeeper may have profound effects on Talyn's crew -- with the conspicuous exception of the Scarrans. "The Choice" was first broadcast on August 17, 2001. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Thanks for Sharing With their "bad" reputation growing apace, Moya's crew has trouble securing vital supplies on the planet Kanvia -- none more vital than Chromextin, a stimulant necessary to cure Moya's offspring starship Talyn. Making matters worse, the crew gets into a brawl with Kanvia security director Tolven (Sandy Winton), who promptly refuses to do business with them ever again. A ray of hope is provided by the machinations of Crichton (Ben Browder) -- or rather, the two diametrically opposite personalities of Crichton's twin alter egos -- but Aeryn (Claudia Black) messes things up when another unsavory aspect of her past returns to haunt her. "Thanks for Sharing" first aired on June 15, 2001. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Suns and Lovers Moya's crew revels in the fact that they have become famous in the Uncharted Territories, but a sudden space storm ends their fun. D'Argo (Anthony Simcoe), feeling betrayed by the romance between his son, Jothee (Matt Newton) and Chiana (Gigi Edgley), teeters on the brink of insanity. If this isn't bad enough, Moya is plagued by a series of gamma disturbances, the source of which can be explained only by the elusive religious fanatic Borlik (Leanna Walsman). "Suns and Lovers" first aired on March 23, 2001. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Season of Death Season three of Farscape opens on a melancholy note, with earthling Crichton (Ben Browder) robbed of the ability to speak, victimized by Scorpius' implanted Neural Clone, and traumatized by the death of his lover Aeryn (Claudia Black). Moya and her crew try to ease Crichton's pain, but it appears that a merciful death is the only solution; certainly, medical diagnostician Grunchik (Hugh Keays-Byrne), plagued by his own past misdeeds, is of no help whatsoever. Meanwhile, crew member Zhaan (Virginia Hey) puts her life on the line to revive the drowned Aeryn. With this episode, former recurring characters Stark (Paul Goddard), Scorpius (Wayne Pygram), and Crais (Lani Tupu) graduated to series-regular status. "Season of Death" initially aired on March 16, 2001. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Revenging Angel Never on the best of terms, Crichton (Ben Browder) and D'Argo (Anthony Simcoe) have another falling out -- this one with potentially fatal consequences. Left alone to command Moya and crew, D'Argo must prevent a nearby Luxan ship from blowing itself up. And while in a comatose state, Crichton enters a colorful animated world that bears startling resemblances not only to his "real" surroundings, but also a vintage Chuck Jones cartoon. "Revenging Angel" originally aired on August 10, 2001. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Incubator Seemingly returning from the dead, Scorpius (Wayne Pygram) takes Crichton's implanted neurochip on a "sentimental journey" to unlock an encrypted section of the chip. In another development, the Relgarian Linfer (Jo Kerrigan) offers to pass along some valuable wormhole travel secrets to the crew. But Linfer's price is steep indeed; she wants immediate possession of the living starship Moya. "Incubator" first aired on July 13, 2001. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Losing Time Worn out from past experiences in general and Crichton's ceaseless wormhole hunts in particular, Moya's crew is at the breaking point. Thus, they're in no shape to do battle with Tallip, an energy parasite which causes an uncontrollable and oftimes fatal shaking reflex. Meanwhile, Jool (Tammy MacIntosh) and Chiana (Gigi Edgley) have a potentially deadly "difference of opinon," while Scorpius (Wayne Pygram) experiences his own personal internal hell. "Losing Time" was initially broadcast on June 29, 2001. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Meltdown When the ailing Aeryn (Claudia Black) rejects a restorative neural implant, Talyn must seek out another host body. But before this happens, Talyn is lured into the gravitational pull of a blazing star, causing a mysterious mist to seep from the starship's inner workings, complicating the crew's efforts to save both Talyn and Aeryn. And who is this not-so-friendly stranger with the really bad sunburn who calls himself Mu-Quillus (Mark Mitchell)? "Meltdown" first aired on July 14, 2001. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Infinite Possibilities, Part 1:Daedalus Demands In this first episode of the two-part story "Infinite Possibilities," the crew members of Talyn have no sooner unwound from past crises than they receive a disturbing communication from the Ancients. It seems that the Farscape 1 module has been spotted journeying through a wormhole at a time when, accordingly to the preordained continuum, the module should be doing nothing of the kind. It turns out that this "Farscape 1" is one of what may be several duplicates created on the heavily guarded planet Dam-Ba-Da. As if this doesn't pile enough problems on the shoulders of John Crichton (Ben Browder), the "friendly" Scorpius clone (named Harvey) implanted with Crichton's brain begins acting up -- and a fleet of enemy Scarran are poised to attack. "Daedalus Demands" originally aired on July 27, 2001. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Fractures Crichton (Ben Browder) is not quite as dead as was previously assumed, but he may wish that he was after the crews of Moya and Talyn stage a tumultuous reunion. Meanwhile, a new group of escapees from the PeaceKeepers is shuttled on board. Unfortunately, one of the refugees may be a PeaceKeeper "mole" -- but is it the Scarran Naj Gil (Thomas Holesgrove), the Nebari Hubero (Kate Beahan), the female Hynerian Orrhn Pak, or the exiled PK technician Markir Tal (Matt Doran)? "Fractures" first aired on August 24, 2001. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Crichton Kicks As Farscape kicks off its fourth season, John Crichton (Ben Browder) has at last solved the equations of wormhole travel. But even this knowledge may not enable him to safely navigate the Uncharted Territories while at the controls of the ancient leviathan Elack. As Crichton searches for Moya and her crew, he must fact the possibility that even if he locates them, he may never be able to link up with them again. Raelee Hill makes her first appearance as Sikozu, who has been hired by a race of neural-cluster harvesters to track down old leviathans like Elack -- but who is unaware of her employers' evil motivations. "Crichton Kicks" originally aired on June 7, 2002. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Terra Firma After journeying back to 1986 and saving his father, Jack (Kent McCord), from certain death, John lands on Earth, where he is reunited with his terrestrial sweetheart, Caroline (Erica Heynatz). The alien Moya crew members are also kept busy, meeting with the understandably nervous Dignitaries of Earth. Naturally, things do not continue to flow along smoothly, placing John in the unenviable position of rescuing his home planet (which he no longer regards as his true home) from destruction. Several plot strands are tragically knotted together around D.K. (Murray Bartlett), the crew's new-found friend. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Kansas After a hiatus of over five months, Farscape resumed its fourth and final season with a foray into the distant past. Rescued by D'Argo (Anthony Simcoe) and the Moya crew from his wormhole odyssey, John Crichton (Ben Browder) discovers that he has inadvertently upset the Timestream. As a result, Crichton and his cohorts end up on Earth in 1986, just before John's father, Jack (Kent McCord), is about to serve as commander on the ill-fated Challenger shuttle flight. With virtually no time to spare, John tries to save his father's life, an action that will prevent the entire Farscape project from slipping into limbo. Elsewhere, the Moya crew encounter that curious native custom known as Halloween, and also attempt to steer clear of a nosy interloper. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Twice Shy While negotiating with traders for maps of Tormented Space, the Moya crew suddenly undergoes profound personality changes. Some of these alterations are for the good, notably the uncharacteristic generosity of the mercenary Rygel (Jonathan Hardy) -- but some may bode ill for the crew, especially an uneasy friendship between the mercurial Scorpius (Wayne Pygram) and soldier-of-fortune Sikozu (Raelee Hill). Can these metamorphoses be due to the influence of Talikaa (Paula Arundell), the slave girl whom Chiana (Gigi Edgley) has rescued from the map traders? ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Unrealized Reality While spacewalking, Crichton (Ben Browder) is sucked into a small wormhole, ending up on what seems to be a floating iceberg occupied by an oddly garbed old man (John Bach). It turns out that the stranger, whom Crichton joshingly nicknames "Einstein," is from a race known as the Ancients, who centuries before had discovered that the universe was connected by a sort of "wormhole highway" and had dedicated themselves to keep the millions of realms thus connected safe from harm. Crichton is told that his own accumulated wormhole knowledge has the potential to disrupt or destroy all the alternate realities in space -- and thus, Einstein has no choice but to execute him. Several former Farscape regulars make cameo appearances via highlights from earlier episodes. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Coup By Clam Moya is guided to the planet Khurtanan for some desperately needed repairs, but none of the planet's mechanics will cooperate unless corrupt local doctor Tumii (Bruce Spence) gives Moya's crew a clean bill of health. Instead, Tumii poisons the crew with the deadly Qatal Mollusk, holding out the antidote unless he is given an enormous bribe. The "good" doctor also strongarms Crichton and Rygel (Jonathan Hardy) into stealing a huge cache of Qatals which are being stored as weapons by a group of resistance fighters. Somehow all this intrigue leads to an incredible sequence wherein the two most aggressively male members of Moya's crew dress up in female drag. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: A Prefect Murder Moya and her crew take refuge from their enemies in "Tormented Space," so named because of the physical and emotional battering endured by anyone traveling through it. Landing on a semi-civilized planet to gather supplies, the crew members find themselves in the middle of a power transition between current prefect Falaak (Bruce Spence) and his hand-picked successor Gaashah (Ivar Kants). What should have been a peaceful stopover turns into a nightmare when Aeryn Sun (Claudia Black), her mind clouded by bizarre and disturbing hallucinations, apparently murders Gaasha. Before long, the rest of the crew are at each other's throats -- the result of the sting from an insect which robs its victims of their free will. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: I Shrink, Therefore I Am Moya is captured by Coreeshi bounty hunters, who hope to collect the reward posted for John Crichton (Ben Browder) by the PeaceKeepers. Tipped off by Pilot to the danger awaiting him, Crichton sneaks back on board and remains in hiding until he can hatch a scheme to rescue his fellow crew members. Meanwhile, Coreeshi leader Axikor (Duncan Young) keeps the balance of power on his side with a unique "containment procedure" -- namely, shrinking Crichton's comrades and sealing them in metal cylinders. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: What Was Lost, Part 2: Resurrection In this second episode of the two-part story "What Was Lost," Crichton (Ben Browder) continues to elude the deceptively seductive PK Commandant Grayza (Rebecca Rigg). Meanwhile, D'Argo (Anthony Simcoe) and Jool (Tammy MacIntosh) formulate a plan to save the Moya crew. And Scorpius (Wayne Pygram) is betrayed by his fellow PKs once again -- and this may be the proverbial straw that breaks the back. "Resurrection" first aired on June 21, 2002. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Into the Lion's Den, Part 2: Wolf in Sheep's Clothing In this second episode of the two-part story "Into the Lion's Den," Scorpius (Wayne Pygram) threatens to blow up the earth unless Crichton (Ben Browder) agrees to help him harvest some new wormhole research. When all other efforts to stymie the PeaceKeepers fail, Crichton rallies the crew in a desperate attempt to destroy the Command Carrier. But where do the fluctuating loyalties of Crais (Lani Tupu) lie in this present crisis? "Wolf in Sheep's Clothing" first aired on April 19, 2002. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: What Was Lost, Part 1: Sacrifice After finally making contact with the surviving Moya crew members, Jool (Tammy MacIntosh) and D'Argo (Anthony Simcoe) learn some amazing facts about Jool's Interon forbears at an old archeological site on the planet Arnessk. The ancient, three-eyed woman (Melissa Jaffer) introduced in the third-season finale "Dog With Two Bones" poses a new threaten to Crichton (Ben Browder). And the seductive but deadly PK Commandant Grayza (Rebecca Rigg) launches another all-out effort to capture Moya and her crew. The first episode of the two-part story "What Was Lost," "Sacrifice" made its TV debut on June 14, 2002. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Promises In order to save her crew, Moya must provide shelter to Ullom (Richard Carter), another fugitive from the PKs. At the same time, Aeryn (Claudia Black) suffers from Sebecean heat delirium, caused by a nearby alien vessel. Ullom may be able to cure Aeryn, but he is not in a particularly generous mood. The outlook is brighter for Crichton (Ben Browder), whose problems with the implanted Neural Clone have come to an abrupt end -- but what does this matter if Crichton loses his beloved Aeryn? "Promises" was originally telecast on July 12, 2002. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Natural Election Entering a wormhole in space, Moya and her crew are trapped in a dank and dismal black hole. Worse still, Moya burns from within thanks to a parasite that threatens to devour the ship, but not before starting small and painful fires along the way. To top it off, the untrustworthy Rygel (Jonathan Hardy) is briefly appointed the captain of Moya -- and Aeryn (Claudia Black) announces that she's pregnant. "Natural Election" was initially telecast on July 19, 2002. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Lava's a Many Splendored Thing Searching for ill-gotten gain around a volcanic cave, light-fingered Rygel (Jonathan Hardy) once agains ends up in the clutches of hostile aliens. This time his captors are the Tarkans, who behave more like the Three Stooges than the usual Farscape bad guys. As Sikozu (Raelee Hill) and Chiana (Gigi Edgley) race to Rygel's rescue at the controls of D'Argo's starship Lo'la, Crichton (Ben Browder) does his best to pull the wool over the eyes of Tarkan bandit chief Raa'Keel (John Adam). "Lava's a Many-Splendored Thing" originally aired on June 28, 2002. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: John Quixote During yet another of her shopping sprees on a commerce planet, Chiana (Gigi Edgley) purchases a handful of "game blobs" -- virtual-reality games which activate upon contacting the owner's flesh. Before long, Crichton (Ben Browder, who also wrote this episode) finds himself trapped in a hellish V.R. world, replete with fearsome ogres, armored knights, and damsels in distress. Even more disturbing is the fact that the events in the game -- and the characters involved -- seem to be inspired by the past experiences of Cricthon and his crew. The explanation for this jarring journey down memory lane has something to do with a shady financial deal struck by former crew member Stark, played by Paul Goddard, making a return appearance to the series along with Virginia Hey as the late, lamented Zhaan. "John Quixote" first aired on July 26, 2002. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Into the Lion's Den, Part 1: Lambs to the Slaughter When Crichton (Ben Browder) finally agrees to share his wormhole knowledge with Scorpius (Wayne Pigrim), the crew is allowed to board the Command Carrier. Aeryn (Claudia Black) and Crais (Lani Tupu) are given a less than cordial welcome by the Carrier's chief officer, Henta (Marta Dusseldorp), and not without good reason. Meanwhile, a mysterious visitor from High Command hopes to exploit a volatile and divisive situation amongst the PeaceKeeper. Rebecca Rigg joins the series in the role of seductive, and highly untrustworthy, PK Commandant Mele-On Grayza. The first episode of the two-part story "Into the Lion's Den," "Lambs to the Slaughter" originally aired on April 12, 2002. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: I-Yensch, You-Yensch After a lengthy hiatus, season three of Farscape resumed on April 5, 2002, with the episode called "I-Yensch, You-Yensch." The title refers to a pair of bracelets, which, when synchronized, result in bizarre nerve effects. This is but one of the episode's many plot strands; others include Moya's reluctance to help Crichton (Ben Browder) put a stop to the PeaceKeeper's wormhole research and a frenzied round of negotiations with Scorpius (Wayne Pygram) to provide safe harbor for the crew on the Command Center. With all this going on, Moya's offspring starship Talyn has trouble coping with the suspense -- and may end up destroying everyone and everything, himself included. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Dog with Two Bones Now that they've emerged victorious from their most recent scrape with the PKs, the combined crew members of Moya and Talyn bid each other goodbye. Crichton finds himself torn between his love for Aeryn (Claudia Black) and his desire to return to earth. A strange old woman (Melissa Jafar, making what is undoubtedly the first of many recurring appearances) complicates matters by inducing some fantastic hallucinations. And while the deceased starship Talyn is given last rites, the sudden appearance of a new wormhole threatens to strand everyone in deep space, without food, water, or oxygen. Paul Goddard and Lani Tupu make their final series appearances as Stark and Crais, respectively. The requisite cliffhanger ending of Farscape's third season, "Dog With Two Bones" originally aired on April 26. 2002. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Bringing Home the Beacon The women of Moya head to a black-market trading post on a derelict Leviathan. Their purpose is to buy an appropriate disguise for Moya in anticipation of enemy attack. Instead, the ladies stumble onto a secret meeting between the Peacekeepers and the Scarrans. Treachery abounds at this conclave, resulting in a violent schism in the relationship between Aeryn (Claudia Black) and Crichton (Ben Browder). ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: A Constellation of Doubt Captured by Scarrans, Aeryn (Claudia Black) is spirited away to the elusive enemy base Katratzi. Hoping to locate his lost love, John Crichton (Ben Browder) uses Pilot to monitor transmissions throughout the universe. Imagine Crichton's surprise when he tunes into a TV tabloid program -- which is currently conducting a vicious and demoralizing smear campaign against John and the Moya crew. The episode's pivotal scene is a showdown between Crichton and Scorpius (Wayne Pygram), with the continued secrecy of John's precious wormhole knowledge hanging in the balance. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Bad Timing In the now-famous final episode of Farscape, a chance remark by John Crichton (Ben Browder) precipitates a full-scale Scarran invasion of Earth. The only hope for salvation is the utter destruction of the wormhole, a drastic action which John is not all that keen on undertaking. Meanwhile, the duplicitous Scorpius (Wayne Pygram) exploits John's uncertainties in order to forge yet one more unholy alliance. Will the Earth be rendered vulnerable and helpless? And what of the relationship between John and Aeryn (Claudia Black)? Yes, the well-publicized denouement is a shocker -- but remember, nothing is "final" in the wondrous world of TV series spin-offs. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: We're So Screwed, Part 1: Fetal Attraction In the first episode of a three-part story, the Moya crew continues searching for Katratzi, the elusive Scarran base where Aeryn (Claudia Black) is being held captive. In the process, Noranti (Melissa Jaffer) inadvertently unleashes a deadly plague known as Hynerian Dermaphollica at a Scarran border station. As it turns out, the disease may actually benefit the crew's efforts to save Aeryn and her unborn baby -- but at least one Moya passenger may suffer mightily in the process. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: We're So Screwed, Part 3: La Bomba In the conclusion of a three-part story, the Moya crew must improvise a new strategy a minute to escape from the Scarran base Katratzi. To keep the unreliable Scorpius (Wayne Pygram) from revealing the secrets of wormhole technology, John Crichton (Ben Browder) may have to cater to Scorpius' every whim -- and right now, that whim involves harvesting Scarran flora. As the episode progresses, the viewer is faced with two disturbing questions: Are the Moya crew members liberators or terrorists -- and will Crichton be forced to detonate his nuclear device? ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: We're So Screwed, Part 2: Hot to Katratzi In the second episode of a three-part story, John Crichton (Ben Browder) has managed to rescue Aeryn (Claudia Black) and is heading for Katratzi, the secret and hitherto elusive Scarran base. A message from "beyond" informs John that the duplicitous Scorpius (Wayne Pygram) is in full possession of the precious wormhole secrets. Now John must rescue Scorpius from his Scarran torturers -- or die in the process, the inevitable result of the nuclear bomb rigged to explode if John should meet with harm. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Prayer Determined to locate Crichton (Ben Browder) and to figure out the precious wormhole knowledge, Scarran captain Jenek (Jason Clarke) aggressively interrogates his prisoner Aeryn (Claudia Black). Upon discovering that Aeryn is pregnant, the Scarrans exhibit a fascination bordering on exultation. Meanwhile, Crichton and Scorpius (Wayne Pygram), having forged an uneasy alliance, conduct a frenzied search for Aeryn -- cutting a swatch of death and devastation along the way. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Mental as Anything D.K. is dead, and Scorpius (Wayne Pygram) wants to track down the alien who did it. For this he must learn to exercise self-control, so Scorpius seeks out his spiritual mentor, Katoya (John Brumpton), at a Mental Arts training camp -- and he coerces Moya's other male crew members to participate in the training. The lessons are potentially beneficial to Crichton (Ben Browder), who is preparing himself for his next run-in with the Scarrans. But D'Argo (Anthony Simcoe) threatens to go off the deep end when he meets another Mental Camp trainee: Macton (Blair Venn), the Peacekeeper who murdered D'Argo's wife, Lo'Lann (Rachel Gordon). ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide
  • Farscape: The Complete Season Two

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Nov 17, 2009

    Includes:Farscape: A Clockwork Nebari (2000) Farscape: Crackers Don't Matter (2000) Farscape: Beware of Dog (2000) Farscape: Dream a Little Dream (2000) Farscape: The Way We Weren't (2000) Farscape: The Ugly Truth (2000) Farscape: The Locket (2000) Farscape: Taking the Stone (2000) Farscape: Picture If You Will (2000) Farscape: Out of Their Minds (2000) Farscape: My Three Crichtons (2000) Farscape: Mind the Baby (2000) Farscape: Look at the Princess, Part 1: A Kiss is But a Kiss (2000) Farscape: Liars, Guns and Money, Part 3: Plan B (2000) Farscape: Liars, Guns and Money, Part 2: With Friends Like These (2000) Farscape: Look at the Princess, Part 3: The Maltese Crichton (2000) Farscape: Look at the Princess, Part 2: I Do, I Think (2000) Farscape: Won't Get Fooled Again (2000) Farscape: Vitas Mortis (2000) Farscape: Liars, Guns and Money, Part 1: A Not So Simple Plan (2000) Farscape: Home on the Remains (2000) Farscape: Die Me, Dichotomy (2000) Farscape: A Clockwork Nebari Moya and her crew knew that someday, somehow, the past of Nebari criminal Chiana (Gigi Edgley) would catch up to her. But when this inevitability finally occurs, the truth of the matter startles everyone. But that's nothing compared to actions of the Nebari who've arrived to "collect" Chiana -- and who also subject the crew to a radical mind-cleansing, robbing them of their free will. What do the Nebari really have in store for Chiana, Moya, and the universe? "A Clockwork Nebari" was first broadcast on September 11, 2000. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Crackers Don't Matter In exchange for safe conduct to his own world, blind scientist T'raltixx (Danny Adcock) offers to provide the living starship Moya with a cloaking shield. Unfortunately, during the modifications necessary to set up the shield, something goes wrong, and as result the crew's emotionalism is heightened to a ridiculous degree. The situation worsens when the crew declares an all-out war over possession of Moya's cracker supply! "Crackers Don't Matter" first aired on April 7, 2000. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Beware of Dog While stopping over at a commerce planet, Moya and her crew pick up a dangerous parasite. Chiana (Gigi Edgley) purchases a small and supposedly benign creature called a Vorc to track down and eliminate the unwelcome "visitor." But the Vorc turns out to be of a deadlier breed than expected -- and still worse, D'Argo (Anthony Simcoe) has been poisoned by the bite of a still-unidentified hideous beast. "Beware of Dog" was originally broadcast on August 11, 2000. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Dream a Little Dream This episode of Farscape was originally presented out of chronological sequence, the explanation being that too much had occurred elsewhere in the saga to permit any earlier telecast. It is now 15 days after the destruction of the PeaceKeeper Gammak Base where Crichton (Ben Browder) had been held prisoner. Zhaan (Virginia Hey) fills Crichton in as to what has happened to Moya and her crew during his absence, including a legal imbroglio on the planet Litigara, where, arrested for a minor jaywalking charge, Zhaan ended up being charged for murder. It was up to Rygel (Jonathan Hardy) and Chiana (Gigi Edgley) to save their fellow crew member before Moya was forced to leave Litigara's orbital field. Alternately known as "Dream a Little Dream" and "Re:Union," this episode first aired on June 23, 2000. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: The Way We Weren't An old PeaceKeeper surveillance recording offers proof that an all-female Pleisar Regiment was responsible for the murder of Moya's original Pilot. Even worse, among the members of the regiment was current Moya crew member Aeryn (Claudia Black), who claims to have no memory of the killing. It is up to Crichton (Ben Browder) to probe Aeryn's subconscious and find out the truth before his outraged fellow crew members turn into a lynch mob. Alternately titled "The Way We Weren'
  • Mastersofsex_ep2_652_home_top_story

    Interview: Michael Sheen discusses the delicate balance of 'Masters of Sex'

    Type: Post | Date: Sunday, Sep 29, 2013

    Actor discusses the process of crafting his version of William Masters
Prev Page 1 3 4