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  • 'Mad Men' gets a huge ratings boost from DVR users

    Type: Post | Date: Friday, Apr 18, 2014

    'Mad Men' gets a huge ratings boost from DVR users Laura Prepon will be back full-time on “Orange is the New Black” in Season 3 “Hot in Cleveland” books Luke Perry
  • Community-basic-sandwich_home_top_story

    Season finale review: 'Community' - 'Basic Sandwich'

    Type: Post | Date: Thursday, Apr 17, 2014

    Annie and Abed lead a hunt for buried treasure, while Jeff and Britta make wedding plans
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    'Arrow' EP Andrew Kreisberg on the debut of two 'Flash' cast members in latest episode

    Type: Article | Date: Thursday, Apr 17, 2014

    Executive producer details 'The Flash' tie-ins and other big revelations
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    'Life Below Zero''s Sue tells of bear attack, 'being comfortable' with death

    Type: Post | Date: Wednesday, Apr 16, 2014

    What she's been through defies belief
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    L.A. Hair

    Type: Event | Date: Thursday, Jul 26, 2012

    Kim Kimble has one (or two) last assignments this year -- it's the season finale.
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    Smallville: The Complete Series - DVD

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Nov 29, 2011

    The complete ten season series now available as a box set on dvd
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    Lost in Space - Blu-ray Disc

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Sep 7, 2010

    Set in the year 2058, the United Global Space Force sends Professor John Robinson and his family on a promotional space jaunt to herald the "offshore" future for the human race
  • Midsomer Murders: Barnaby's Casebook

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Jan 5, 2010

    Includes:Midsomer Murders: The Killings at Badgers Drift (1996) Midsomer Murders: Death of a Hollow Man (1998) Midsomer Murders: Written in Blood (1998) Midsomer Murders: Faithful Unto Death (1998) Midsomer Murders: Death in Disguise (1998) Midsomer Murders: Dead Man's Eleven (1999) Midsomer Murders: Death of a Stranger (1999) Midsomer Murders: Blood Will Out (1999) Midsomer Murders: Strangler's Wood (1999) Midsomer Murders: Death's Shadow (1999) Midsomer Murders: Judgement Day (2000) Midsomer Murders: Garden of Death (2000) Midsomer Murders: Blue Herrings (2000) Midsomer Murders: Beyond the Grave (2000) Midsomer Murders: Dark Autumn (2001) Midsomer Murders: Destroying Angel (2001) Midsomer Murders: Tainted Fruit (2001) Midsomer Murders: Who Killed Cock Robin? (2001) Midsomer Murders: The Electric Vendetta (2001) Midsomer Murders: Market for Murder (2002) Midsomer Murders: A Worm in the Bud (2002) Midsomer Murders: Ring out Your Dead (2002) Midsomer Murders: Murder on St. Malley's Day (2002) Midsomer Murders: The Green Man (2003) Midsomer Murders: Painted in Blood (2003) Midsomer Murders: A Talent for Life (2003) Midsomer Murders: Birds of Prey (2003) Midsomer Murders: A Tale of Two Hamlets (2003) Midsomer Murders: Death and Dreams (2003) Midsomer Murders: The Maid in Splendour (2004) Midsomer Murders: Things That Go Bump in the Night (2004) Midsomer Murders: The Straw Woman (2004) Midsomer Murders: Ghosts of Christmas Past (2004) Midsomer Murders: Sins of Commission (2004) Midsomer Murders: The Fisher King (2004) Midsomer Murders: Bad Tidings (2004) Midsomer Murders: Dead in the Water (2004) Midsomer Murders: The House in the Woods (2005) Midsomer Murders: Orchis Fatalis (2005) Midsomer Murders: Hidden Depths (2005) Midsomer Murders: Second Sight (2005) Midsomer Murders: Sauce for the Goose (2005) Midsomer Murders: Bantling Boy (2005) Midsomer Murders: Midsomer Rhapsody (2005) Midsomer Murders: Vixen's Run (2006) Midsomer Murders: Country Matters (2006) Midsomer Murders: Last Year's Model (2006) Midsomer Murders: Four Funerals and a Wedding (2006) Midsomer Murders: Dance With the Dead (2006) Midsomer Murders: Death in Chorus (2006) Midsomer Murders: Dead Letters (2006) Midsomer Murders: Down Among The Dead Men (2006) Midsomer Murders: The Axeman Cometh (2007) Midsomer Murders: The Animal Within (2007) Midsomer Murders: King's Crystal (2007) Midsomer Murders: The Killings at Badgers Drift This is the first in a television series of British-made murder mysteries, adapted from Caroline Graham's novels about the polite and enigmatic Inspector Barnaby (John Nettles). Barnaby is married to the equally low-key Joyce (Jane Wymark), and they have an assertive daughter, Cully (Laura Howard). Barnaby's opposite is his acerbic partner, Troy (Daniel Casey). This pilot episode is set in the English county Midsomer. After the death of elderly Emily Simpson (Renee Asherson), her friend gets Barnaby to investigate, and the suspects include Michael Lacey (Jonathan Firth), curiously attached to his attractive sister Katherine (Emily Mortimer). The series premiered June 28, 1998 on A&E. ~ Bhob Stewart, All Movie Guide Midsomer Murders: Death of a Hollow Man First telecast in England on March 29, 1998, Death of a Hollow Man was the third feature-length entry in the Midsomer Murders mystery series. The plot is set in motion when the wife of Chief Inspector John Barnaby (John Nettles) joins a local amateur theatrical troupe. As the unpaid thespians mount a production of Amadeus at the Corn Exchange in Causton, the body of an elderly villager is found floating in a stream near Ferne Bassett. No sooner has Barnaby been told that the dead man was attacked and beaten before drowning, another floating body is discovered -- that of Agnes Gray (Denyse Alexander), one of Mrs. Barnaby's fellow actors. Adapted by Caroline Graham from her own novel, Midsomer Murders: Death of a Hollow Man was first shown in America via the A&E cable network on April 14, 2001. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Midsomer Murders: Written in Blood No synopsis available. Midsomer Murders: Faithful Unto Death No synopsis available. Midsomer Murders: Death in Disguise No synopsis available. Midsomer Murders: Dead Man's Eleven The eighth feature-length episode of the British detective series Midsomer Murders, "Dead Man's Eleven" premiered in the U.K. on September 12, 1999. Having had his fill of Midsomer Worthy, Detective Chief Inspector Barnaby (John Nettles) prepares to move himself and his family to the village of Fletcher's Cross. Alas, Barnaby's move is delayed by yet another murder: The wife of a prosperous landowner has been brutally bludgeoned to death with a cricket bat. Suspicion immediately falls upon the landowner's son (it was his bat, after all), but with no conclusive evidence, Barnaby and his assistant Troy (Daniel Casey) cannot close the case. And then another murder occurs...and another? "Dead Man's Eleven" first aired in the United States on August 12, 2000. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Midsomer Murders: Death of a Stranger No synopsis available. Midsomer Murders: Blood Will Out Midsomer Murders: Blood Will Out features John Netters as Inspector Barnaby who must deal with the townfolk reacting outrageously to a group of people traveling through the area. ~ Perry Seibert, All Movie Guide Midsomer Murders: Strangler's Wood Midsomer Murders: Strangler's Wood features John Netters as Inspector Barnaby who must deal with unpleasant memories while investigating the death of a woman from Brazil. ~ Perry Seibert, All Movie Guide Midsomer Murders: Death's Shadow Midsomer Murders: Death's Shadow features John Netters as Inspector Barnaby who investigates a popular stage director about a series of murders. ~ Perry Seibert, All Movie Guide Midsomer Murders: Judgement Day First telecast in England on January 29, 2000, Judgement Day was the 12th feature-length entry in the Midsomer Murders mystery series. The citizens of Midsomer Mallow are all atwitter in their efforts to win the Perfect Village competition. Alas, a pall is cast on the festivities when a local thief and philanderer is killed with a pitchfork. Inspector Tom Barnaby (John Nettles) really has his work cut out for him this time, inasmuch as seemingly everybody in town had motive and opportunity. Making matters worse, two of the Perfect Village judges are likewise murdered in the same grisly fashion. Based on a novel by Caroline Graham, Midsomer Murders: Judgement Day made its American cable-TV debut by way of the A&E network on January 13, 2001. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Midsomer Murders: Garden of Death No synopsis available. Midsomer Murders: Blue Herrings The 11th feature-length episode of the British detective series Midsomer Murders, "Blue Herrings" finds Detective Chief Inspector Barnaby (John Nettles) taking a "working vacation" so he can redecorate his digs. But first, Barnaby pays a visit to his Aunt Alice (Phyllis Calvert), who is convalescing from an operation at the Lawnside Nursing Home. Murder inevitably rears its ugly head when several of Alice's fellow patients die mysteriously after altering their wills. First telecast in the U.K. on January 22, 2000, "Blue Herrings" made its American cable-TV bow on September 23 of that same year. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Midsomer Murders: Beyond the Grave The 13th feature-length episode of the British detective series Midsomer Murders, "Beyond the Grave" is set in motion by a mysterious act of vandalism at the Aspen Tallow museum. When a 17th century painting is slashed to pieces, the superstitious locals believe that the damage was the handiwork of one Jonathan Lowrie -- and never mind that he has been dead for centuries. Ultimately, a number of mysterious deaths occur, which some attribute to Lowrie but which DCI Tom Barnaby (John Nettles) believes are being committed by someone who is still very much alive. As he pursues his investigation, Tom is also pressed into service as a "technical advisor" for his daughter's actor-boyfriend (Ed Waters), who has been cast as a cop in a popular TV soap opera. "Beyond the Grave" was first telecast in the U.K. on February 5, 2000, and in the U.S. on April 8 of that same year. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Midsomer Murders: Dark Autumn Dark Autumn is the 18th feature-length installment of the off-and-on British TV crime series Midsomer Murders. This time, self-effacing Detective Constable Inspector Tom Barnaby (John Nettles) and his assistant Detective Sergeant Troy (Daniel Casey) head to the rural village of Goodman's Land, where the local postman has been murdered. It is soon revealed that the victim fancied himself the village Lothario, and that several men -- mostly outraged husbands -- had good reason to wish him ill. Eventually another murder occurs, which is not altogether bad news for Troy, who has grown fond of attractive local female Police Constable Jay Nash (Gillian Kearney). Series regulars Jane Wymark (as Joyce Barnaby) and Barry Jackson (as Dr. George Bullard) make brief appearances. First telecast in England by ITV on September 16, 2001, Midsomer Murders: Dark Autumn made its American TV bow over the A&E cable network on January 5, 2002. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Midsomer Murders: Destroying Angel In this two-hour episode of the long-running British mystery series Midsomer Murder, the owner of the rural Easterly Grange Hotel passes away, bequeathing his establishment to four very different people. One of the heirs, a fairground entertainer, disappears shortly afterward -- and within a few days, his severed hand is found. Several more deaths occur before Detective Chief Constable Tom Barnaby (John Nettles) and his assistant, Detective Sergeant Gavin Troy (Daniel Casey) can determine what exactly is going on and who is responsible. First telecast over Britain's ITV on August 26, 2001, Midsomer Murders: Destroying Angel made its American cable-TV bow courtesy of the A&E Network on August 26, 2001. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Midsomer Murders: Tainted Fruit No synopsis available. Midsomer Murders: Who Killed Cock Robin? In this 17th feature-length episode of the British detective series Midsomer Murders, provincial DCI Tom Barnaby (John Nettles) is summoned when local doctor Oliver Burgess (Ian McNeice) believes he has struck a pedestrian while driving home from his favorite pub -- only to discover that the "victim" is nowhere to be found. This curious incident coincides with the disappearance of an Irishman who has recently and mysteriously popped up in the village. Adding to the intrigue is the upcoming wedding of the daughter of Melvyn Stockard (Larry Lamb), a former criminal with whom Barnaby has tilted in the past. The nuptials are put on hold when the Best Man is murdered; could this tragedy possibly be related to the aforementioned disappearances? First telecast in the U.K. on September 9, 2001, "Who Killed Cock Robin" aired in the U.S. via the A&E cable network on October 5, 2002. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Midsomer Murders: The Electric Vendetta No synopsis available. Midsomer Murders: Market for Murder No synopsis available. Midsomer Murders: A Worm in the Bud No synopsis available. Midsomer Murders: Ring out Your Dead No synopsis available. Midsomer Murders: Murder on St. Malley's Day No synopsis available. Midsomer Murders: The Green Man No synopsis available. Midsomer Murders: Painted in Blood No synopsis available. Midsomer Murders: A Talent for Life No synopsis available. Midsomer Murders: Birds of Prey No synopsis available. Midsomer Murders: A Tale of Two Hamlets No synopsis available. Midsomer Murders: Death and Dreams No synopsis available. Midsomer Murders: The Maid in Splendour No synopsis available. Midsomer Murders: Things That Go Bump in the Night No synopsis available. Midsomer Murders: The Straw Woman No synopsis available. Midsomer Murders: Ghosts of Christmas Past No synopsis available. Midsomer Murders: Sins of Commission No synopsis available. Midsomer Murders: The Fisher King No synopsis available. Midsomer Murders: Bad Tidings No synopsis available. Midsomer Murders: Dead in the Water No synopsis available. Midsomer Murders: The House in the Woods No synopsis available. Midsomer Murders: Orchis Fatalis No synopsis available. Midsomer Murders: Hidden Depths No synopsis available. Midsomer Murders: Second Sight No synopsis available. Midsomer Murders: Sauce for the Goose No synopsis available. Midsomer Murders: Bantling Boy No synopsis available. Midsomer Murders: Midsomer Rhapsody No synopsis available. Midsomer Murders: Vixen's Run No synopsis available. Midsomer Murders: Country Matters No synopsis available. Midsomer Murders: Last Year's Model No synopsis available. Midsomer Murders: Four Funerals and a Wedding No synopsis available. Midsomer Murders: Dance With the Dead No synopsis available. Midsomer Murders: Death in Chorus No synopsis available. Midsomer Murders: Dead Letters No synopsis available. Midsomer Murders: Down Among The Dead Men No synopsis available. Midsomer Murders: The Axeman Cometh No synopsis available. Midsomer Murders: The Animal Within No synopsis available. Midsomer Murders: King's Crystal No synopsis available.
  • Waltons: Complete Seasons 1 & 2

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Jan 5, 2010

    Includes:The Waltons: The Hunt (1972) The Waltons: The Carnival (1972) The Waltons: The Calf (1972) The Waltons: The Minstrel (1972) The Waltons: The Typewriter (1972) The Waltons: The Star (1972) The Waltons: The Boy From the C.C.C. (1972) The Waltons: The Ceremony (1972) The Waltons: The Legend (1972) The Waltons: The Dust Bowl Cousins (1972) The Waltons: The Reunion (1972) The Waltons: The Literary Man (1972) The Waltons: The Foundling (1972) The Waltons: The Sinner (1972) The Waltons: The Thanksgiving Story, Part 1 (1973) The Waltons: The Townie (1973) The Waltons: The Scholar (1973) The Waltons: An Easter Story, Part 1 (1973) The Waltons: The Love Story (1973) The Waltons: The Triangle (1973) The Waltons: The Thanksgiving Story, Part 2 (1973) The Waltons: An Easter Story, Part 2 (1973) The Waltons: The Actress (1973) The Waltons: The Fire (1973) The Waltons: The Gypsies (1973) The Waltons: The Deed (1973) The Waltons: The Bicycle (1973) The Waltons: The Journey (1973) The Waltons: The Odyssey (1973) The Waltons: The Separation (1973) The Waltons: The Roots (1973) The Waltons: The Chicken Thief (1973) The Waltons: The Braggart (1973) The Waltons: The Fawn (1973) The Waltons: The Air Mail Man (1973) The Waltons: The Bequest (1973) The Waltons: The Substitute (1973) The Waltons: The Prize (1973) The Waltons: The Theft (1973) The Waltons: The Courtship (1973) The Waltons: The Gift (1974) The Waltons: The Heritage (1974) The Waltons: The Five Foot Shelf (1974) The Waltons: The Graduation (1974) The Waltons: The Car (1974) The Waltons: The Cradle (1974) The Waltons: The Fulfillment (1974) The Waltons: The Ghost Story (1974) The Waltons: The Honeymoon (1974) The Waltons: The Awakening (1974) The Waltons: The Hunt In this episode from the first season of the long-running television series The Waltons, 16-year-old John-Boy (Richard Thomas) is deemed old enough to go hunting and he volunteers to join a turkey shoot. But John-Boy hates the idea of killing animals, and when a prize bird is in his rifle's sight, he finds that he can't pull the trigger. John-Boy is worried that his father (Ralph Waite) will think he's a coward, but soon John-Boy is given another opportunity to prove his bravery. Meanwhile, Mary-Ellen (Judy Norton-Taylor) has been saving her money to buy a baseball glove, but when G.W. Haines (David Doremus), a boy that she likes, begins spending his time with a pretty girl, Mary-Ellen wonders if she should buy a nice dress instead in hopes of winning back G.W.'s attentions. The Waltons: The Hunt first aired on October 5, 1972. ~ Mark Deming, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Carnival Olivia (Michael Learned) strongly disapproves when husband John (Ralph Waite) invites four travelling carnival performers (one of them played by legendary "little person" Billy Barty) to stay with the Walton family. The quartet of "carnies" had found themselves stranded after their manager skipped town with the carnival's profits. Ever so gradually, Olivia warms up to these curious but likeable nomads -- and when the four entertainers discover that the Waltons hadn't had enough money to attend their carnival when it first arrived on the Mountain, a very special performance is staged in the family's barn. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Calf Much to the dismay of the younger Walton children, their pet calf is sold for nine dollars to farmer George Anderson (Leonard Stone), who intends to slaughter the animal for its meat. John Walton (Ralph Waite) doesn't really want to break his kids' hearts, but facts are facts: a male calf is of no use on their farm, and the family needs that nine dollars to repair their truck. Ultimately, John weakens and tries to buy the calf back, only to have the canny Anderson increase the asking price -- thereby all but goading the Walton youngsters into becoming cattle thieves! ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Minstrel Feeling cut off from the outside world, Mary Ellen (Judy Norton-Taylor) is quite receptive to the attentions paid her by wandering folksinger Jamie (Peter Hooten), who has come to the Mountain in hopes of gleaning song material from elderly Maude Gormley (Merie Earle). Mary Ellen spends so much time with Jamie that she begins neglecting her family responsibilities, causing considerable friction between herself, her parents and her siblings. When Jamie rejects Mary Ellen as being "just a kid" and unworthy of his affections, the disillusioned girl is more determined than ever to escape her "repressive" surroundings--sparking another of those famous Walton family rallies to set things right. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Typewriter In this pivotal episode, budding writer John-Boy (Richard Thomas) is encouraged by his teacher Miss Hunter (Mariclare Costello) to send one of his stories to a national magazine. Unfortunately, the publication accepts only typed manuscripts, and John-Boy can't afford a typewriter. With no other options at hand, he secretly "borrows" an antique typewriter belonging to the wealthy Baldwin sisters (Helen Kleeb, Mary Jackson) -- only to find himself in quite a quandary when Mary Ellen (Judy Norton-Taylor) unwittingly gives the old machine to a travelling junk dealer (George Tobias). ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Star Virtually everyone on Walton's Mountain is profoundly affected when a meteorite falls through the Baldwin sisters' roof. Grandpa (Will Geer) in particular regards the falling star as a grim omen, perhaps of his own imminent demise. Meanwhile, the Baldwins' disreputable cousin Polonius (Iggie Wolfington) tries to capitalize on the astronomical phenomenon by insisting that the meteorite has been sent as warning to the ladies to stop brewing their special moonshine...and to hand their famous "recipe" over to him. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Boy From the C.C.C. This episode recalls the time when impoverished teenagers found employment (not always voluntarily) by working in the government-sponsored Civilian Conservation Corps. One such youngster is Gino (Michael Rupert), a hard-bitten New York slum kid. Running away from a C.C.C. camp near Walton's Mountain, Gino seeks temporary shelter by the Walton family. Unable to accept the family's kindness and generosity, Gino ends up stealing from his hosts. John Walton (Ralph Waite) is all for having Gino arrested until a crisis involving his daughter Elizabeth (Kami Cotler) opens John's eyes to the boy's essential decency. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Ceremony A family of Jewish refugees settles in a small cottage on Walton's Mountain. Terrified that the Nazi persecution that had forced them from their homeland has followed them to America, Professor David Mann (Noah Keen) warns his family not tell anyone that they are Jewish. Crestfallen that he will not be permitted to celebrate his Bar Mitzvah, Paul Mann (Radames Peras) loses all respect for his father--and it is up to the Waltons to convince the Manns that their dark days are past, and to reunite the Professor and his son. Featured as Eva Mann is Ellen Geer, the daughter of series regular Will Geer (Grandpa Walton). ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Legend John (Ralph Waite) is visited by his old Army buddy Tip Harrison (James Antonio), who regales the Walton family with stories of his colorful exploits during WW1. Unforutnately, Tip is so entrenched in the past that he finds it impossible to live in the present. His inability to "fit in" with his current surroundings results in a couple of near-tragedies, including a disastrous fire--for which Tip, terrified of losing John's friendship, allows one of the Walton boys to take the blame! ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Dust Bowl Cousins The Waltons pay host to their Kansas cousins, the Denbys, who have lost their farm to the ravages of the Dust Bowl. Unfortunately, the Denbys also seem to have lost their scruples, and before long they are taking undue advantage of the Waltons. Despite repeated assurances that he has some job prospects in Newport News , it is painfully obvious that Ham Denby (Warren Vanders) has no intention of moving either himself or his family from Walton's Mountain. This episode won the Director's Guild of America award for Robert Butler. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Reunion The Baldwin sisters are once again visited by one of their less reputable relatives. This time, their guest is cousin Homer (Denver Pyle), who hopes to persuade Miss Emily (Mary Jackson) and Miss Mamie (Helen Kleeb) to hold a Baldwin family reunion. In truth, however, Homer plans to use the occasion as a subterfuge, to get his grubby fingers on the sisters' secret moonshine recipe. Ultimately, the ladies realize that they've been hoodwinked--and worse still, none of their relatives is going to show up for their reunion. As John-Boy Walton (Richard Thomas) tries to help the Baldwins weather this crisis, his younger brother Jim-Bob (David W. Harper) has a problem of a different nature on his hands, involving a most unusual schoolyard bully. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Literary Man Globetrotting author A.J. Covington (David Huddleston) finds himself briefly stranded on Walton's Mountain. In answer to John-Boy's incessant questions on how to become a writer, Covington modestly advises him to "write what you know"--and, not so modestly, regales the boy with tales of his own adventures. Inevitably, John-Boy (Richard Thomas) begins spending far too much time conversing with Covington, neglecting his responsibilities at the Walton's lumberyard to the extent that the family may lose a lucrative (and sorely needed) timber contract.This episode won an Emmy Award for Best Cinematography. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Foundling The debut episode of The Waltons is set in 1933, with the Walton family of Virginia coping as best they can with the ravages of the Depression. The emphasis is on eldest Walton son John-Boy (Richard Thomas), who is struggling to communicate with a melancholy deaf girl named Holly (Erica Hunton), whose mother Ruth (Charlotte Stewart) had abandoned the girl on the Walton doorstep. Almost miraculously, John-Boy and his siblings are able to break through to Holly and teach her sign language. Unfortunately, while trying to convey the information that John-Boy's sister Elizabeth (Kami Cotler) has gotten locked in a trunk, Holly is intercepted by her father Anson (Richard Kelton), who, failing to understand the girl's wild gesticulations, takes her home, leaving poor Elizabeth to her fate! ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Sinner John Ritter makes his first appearance as Matthew Fordwick, the new minister on Walton's Mountain. No sooner has the sober, upright Rev. Fordwick arrived than he pays a visit to his distant relatives, the Baldwin sisters. Innocently consuming far too much of the Baldwins' special "recipe," the Reverend ends up making a drunken spectacle of himself. It is up to John Walton (Ralph Waite) -- who'd initally been offended by Fordwick's overbearing religious fervency -- to persuade the poor man not to leave the Mountain in disgrace. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Thanksgiving Story, Part 1 In the first half of a two-part story (originally telecast as a single two-hour episode), John-Boy (Richard Thomas) is afforded the opportunity to qualify for a scholarship at Boatwright University--and, as icing on the cake, his former girlfriend Jenny (Sian Barbara Allen) is paying a return visit to Walton's Mountain. But joy turns to despair when John-Boy is injured in an accident, which may render him permanently blind. Meanwhile, Jason (Jon Walmsley) is beginning to have second thoughts about accepting a job from the dithery Baldwin Sisters (Mary Jackson, Helen Kleeb). ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Townie In her first Waltons appearance, future Oscar winner Sissy Spacek) is cast as Sarah, the sheltered daughter of hyper-religious Widow Simmonds (Allyn Ann McLerie). In a desperate attempt to emerge from her shell, Sarah all but throws herself upon John-Boy (Richard Thomas). He gently resists her romantic overtures, whereupon Sarah takes up with a callow "townie" named Theodore Claypool Jr. (Nicholas Hammond]), the son of a wealthy businessman. Ultimately, Sarah and Theodore elope--and both her mother and his father hold John-Boy responsible for this catastrophe! ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Scholar Lynn Hamilton makes her first series appearance as Verdie Grant (Lynn Hamilton), one of the black residents of Walton's Mountain. Receiving word that her daughter is about to graduate from college, Verdie is reluctant to attend the ceremonies because she is unable to read or write, a secret she has always been too proud to reveal. John-Boy (Richard Thomas) offers to tutor Verdie on the condition that no one will ever find out about her illiteracy. The two work out a subterfuge whereby John-Boy will instruct Verdie while pretending to "play school" with his little sister Erin (Mary Elizabeth McDonough)--who reveals the truth at a critical juncture in the story. This episode earned an Emmy Award for scriptwriter John McGreevey. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: An Easter Story, Part 1 In the first half of The Waltons' two-part Season One finale (originally telecast as a single two-hour episode), Mary Ellen (Judy Norton-Taylor) nervously looks forward to her first Easter dance. But her anticpation of this momentous event is eclipsed by a potential tragedy in the Walton household: Olivia (Michael Learned) has been stricken with polio. Though Dr. Vance grimly predicts that Olivia will never walk again, John-Boy (Richard Thomas) refuses to give up hope, and embarks upon a curious odyssey in desperate search of a miracle. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Love Story Sian Barbara Allen makes her first series appearance as Jenny Pendleton, a runaway from her family in Richmond. Convinced that there is no room for her at home now that her widowed father (Gordon Rigsby) has remarried, Jenny hides out on a patch of her family's property on Walton's Mountain. It is here that the girl is found by John-Boy Walton (Richard Thomas)--who instantly falls in love with her and invites her to stay a while with his family. Luxuriating in the warmth and kindness of the Walton household, Jenny hopes to remain there permanently...but then tragedy intervenes. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Triangle John-Boy (Richard Thomas) develops a crush on his teacher Miss Hunter (Mariclare Costello), whom he regards as his literary inspiration. But when Reverend Fordwick (John Ritter]) begins courting Miss Hunter, the envious John-Boy may nip his writing career in the bud just out of spite! Meanwhile, brother Ben (Eric Scott) is likewise having "heart trouble", prompting him to go the body-building route (courtesy of a mail-order course) to impress the girl of his dreams. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Thanksgiving Story, Part 2 In the conclusion of a two-part story (originally telecast as a single two-part episode), John-Boy (Richard Thomas) refuses to reveal the seriousness of his accident, terrified that he will no longer qualify for a scholarship at Boatwright University. As John-Boy's eyesight grows weaker with each passing day, it is painfully obvious that the only way he can prevent permanent blindness is to undergo surgery. . .if it isn't already too late. Elsewhere, Olivia (Michael Learned) is outraged to discover that Jason (Jon Walsmley) has been dragooned into helping the Baldwin Sisters cook up their intoxicating "recipe"; and Ben (Eric Scott) and Grandpa (Will Geer) continue hunting for the family's Thanksgiving turkey. This episode earned an Emmy Award for scriptwriter Joanna Lee. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: An Easter Story, Part 2 In the conclusion of The Waltons' two-part Season One finale (originally telecast as a single two-hour episode), the outlook is bleak for Olivia Walton (Michael Learned), who has been stricken with polio and may never walk again. Refusing to accept this prognosis, John-Boy (Richard Thomas) puts his faith in a radical new medical procedure created by the legendary Sister Kenny. Meanwhile, Mary Ellen (Judy Norton-Taylor) tries to teach G.W. Haines (David Doremus) to dance in time for their Easter date; and Jason (Jon Walmsley) enters an amateur song contest with his own composition, "The Ironing Board Blues". "An Easter Story" was later released theatrically in Australia as the feature film A Walton Crisis. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Actress When her limousine breaks down on the Mountain, flamboyant Hollywood actress Alvira Drummond (Pippa Scott) accepts the hospitality of the Walton family. Not unexpectedly, Mary Ellen (Judy Norton-Taylor) is quite star-struck by the glamorous visitor--while Grandma Walton (Ellen Corby) dourly disapproves of Alvira's "fast" lifestyle , and is openly suspicious of the actress' claims that all her money and valuables have been stolen. Thanks to gossipy telephone operator Fanny Tatum (played here by Dorothy Neumann rather than Sheila Allen), a few inconvenient truths about the "fabulously successful" Alvira Drummond ultimately come to light. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Fire Walton's Mountain turns into a battleground over the teaching of Evolution. Lutie Bascomb (Richard Bradford), a hard-luck farmer whose violent temper has gotten worse since the breakup of his marriage, storms into the classroom of Miss Hunter (Mariclare Costello) and accuses her of "blasphemy" for explaining Darwin's theory to Lutie's daughter Lois Mae (Laurie Prange). The war of words reaches an ominous climax when Lutie threatens to kill Miss Hunter--and not long afterward, the schoolhouse is engulfed in flames! ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Gypsies Caught in a heavy rainstorm on Walton's Mountain, a family of Gypsies takes refuge it what seems to be a deserted house. Actually, it's the home of the Baldwin sisters, temporarily out of town. The Gypsies' unwitting "break-in" fuels the bigotry of Matt Beckwith (William Bramley), who tries to turn the other residents of the Mountain against the nomadic family. When the Waltons offer to lend a helping hand, the Gypsies are too proud to accept...even though their baby is gravely ill. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Deed Unable to produce the deed to their land, the Waltons are threatened with eviction from the mountain by a powerful lumber company. In order to raise the $200 necessary to register a deed, John (Ralph Waite) and John-Boy (Ralph Waite) head to the "big city", looking for work. Just when it seems that their troubles are over, the money is stolen by a pair of street bandits. An unhappy ending? Not THIS early in the nine-year TV run of The Waltons!. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Bicycle Using John-Boy (Richard Thomas) as a go-between, blacksmith Curtis Norton (Ned Beatty) carries on a long-distance courtship with city girl Ann Harris (Ivy Jones). Though John-Boy sees no harm in writing Curtis' love letters for the shy Smithy, his tendency to embellish the facts causes big problems when Ann pays a visit to Walton's Mountain. Meanwhile, Olivia (Michael Learned) begins fantasizing about an operatic career while bicycling to her weekly choir practice. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Journey The second season of The Waltons begins as the family's eldest son John-Boy (Richard Thomas) is torn between his own youthful desires and the more pressing needs of an elderly person. Octogenarian Maggie MacKenzie (Linda Watkins) is resolved to the fact that she isn't long for this world, but she refuses to give up the ghost until she is able to see the Atlantic Ocean one last time--the same Atlantic Ocean that had carried herself and her late husband from Scotland to America so many years ago. Pressed into service to transport Maggie to the seacoast is John-Boy, but he isn't happy about the assignment: Maggie's odyssey may well prevent him from attending a big dance with his erstwhile girlfriend Marsha (Tammi Bula). Series creator Earl Hamner Jr. briefly appears as Maggie's husband in a flashback sequence. This episode earned the Directors' Guild of America award for Harry Harris. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Odyssey Seeking solitude to write his stories, John-Boy (Richard Thomas) takes a hike into the mountains. But peace and quiet is not on his schedule when he comes across his friend Sarah Simmonds (Sissy Spacek in her second series appearance), who has run away from her husband--and who is very pregnant and very, very ill. This chance meeting occurs not long after an earlier encounter between John-Boy and elderly mountain dweller Granny Ketchum (Frances Williams), who in repayment for a favor had supplied him with a home-made medicinal potion. When Sarah downs the potion, she suddenly goes into labor...and John-Boy is the only person within miles who can help her! ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Separation The plot of this episode is sparked (no pun intended) by an overdue electric bill. In his efforts to raise the necessary funds, Grandpa Walton (Will Geer) becomes enmeshed in a situation that incurs the wrath of Grandma (Ellen Corby). This minor and rather silly misunderstanding escalates into a bitter quarrel--whereupon Grandpa and Grandma, too stubborn to admit their mistakes and reconcile their differences, may well be on the verge of a permanent split-up! This episode is based on a story by series regular Ellen Corby). ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Roots Hal Williams and Erin Blunt make their first series appearances as itinerant laborer Harley Foster and his son Jody. After a brief and tantalizing glimpse of family life at the Walton home, Jody begs his father to stop wandering and settle down. But the fiercely independent Harley prefers his nomadic existence, prompting Jody to take drastic action to get what he wants. All the while, Harley seems unaware that widow Verdie Grant (Lynn Hamilton) has set her cap for him--but he won't stay unaware for long! ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Chicken Thief John-Boy (Richard Thomas) catches his friend Yancy Tucker (Robert Donner) stealing chickens, but decides not to tell their sheriff. This may prove to be the wrong decision when chicken farmer Charlie Potter (Richard O'Brien) is shot--and Yancy is the only likely suspect. And speaking of thievery, Ben (Eric Scott) gets himself in hot water when he "borrows" one of John-Boy's old poems, "A Winter Mountain", to win a literary competition. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Braggart Orphan Hobie Shanks (Michael McGreevey), who years earlier had briefly stayed with the Waltons, returns to the Mountain brimming over with braggadocio. Everyone is impressed by Hobie's claim that he is about to be given a pitching tryout with a professional baseball team--everyone, that is, except the envious John-Boy (Richard Thomas), who thinks that Hobie is full of hot air. Surprisingly, it turns out that Hobie is telling the truth . . .but he may never get the chance to become a "pro" thanks to a freak accident. (Trivia note: guest star Michael McGreevey is the son of frequent Waltons scriptwriter John McGreevey--who, incidentally, did NOT write this episode). ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Fawn John-Boy (Richard Thomas) learns a few harsh and bitter life lessons when he accepts a job collecting debts for shifty absentee landlord Graham Foster (Charles Tyner). Meanwhile, John-Boy's sister Erin (Mary Elizabeth McDonough), feeling that her brother has let her down by aligning himself with Foster, shifts her affections to a wild fawn--and refuses to set the animal free, even when her family gets in trouble with the local authorities. This episode was directed by series regular Ralph Waite (John Walton). ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Air Mail Man Olivia's birthday party is interrupted by the forced landing of mail pilot Todd Cooper (Paul Michael Glaser) on Walton's Mountain. Putting their own concerns aside for the moment, the family pitches in to repair Todd's damaged plane--and, indirectly, to patch up his faltering relationship with his wife Sue (Julie Cobb). This done, everyone comes forth with a present for birthday girl Olivia (Michael Learned)...but Todd's present is the most impressive of all, and one that Olivia will never forget! ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Bequest Grandma Walton (Ellen Corby) is pleasantly surprised when she receives a huge bequest--a whole $250!--from a casual acquaintance. Naturally, everybody in the Walton household has a special plan on how best to spend the money, and just as naturally, Grandma intends to be generous with her windfall, not only doling it out to her family but to the rest of the community. But an unexpected development puts a damper on that generosity--and now Grandma is faced with the prospect of being unable to keep her word for the first time in her life. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Substitute While Miss Hunter (Mariclare Costello) is out of town on family business, her classroom is taken over by youthful substitute teacher Megan Pollard (Catherine Burns), a transplanted New Yorker. Though undeniably brilliant, Megan is incapable of "relating" to mountain folk, and before long her rigid, dictatorial teaching methods have alienated students and parents alike. Meanwhile, Grandpa resists the temptation to help Ben build a kite for a contest. This episode represents a reunion between series regular Richard Thomas and guest star Catherine Burns, who had previously costarred in the memorable "coming-of-age" film drama Last Summer (1969). ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Prize The Waltons attend the annual County Fair, where each family member hopes to win a prize. At the same time, Olivia's former beau Oscar Cockrell (Peter Donat) shows up at the fair in hopes of advancing his political career. Comparing Oscar's affluence with his own family's lack of same, John-Boy (Richard Thomas) asks himself how different his life would have been if Olivia (Michael Learned) had accepted Oscar's proposal. Meanwhile, a "special ingredient" in Olivia's cake has a curious effect on the contest judges! ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Theft John Walton (Ralph Waite) is accused of stealing some valuable silver goblets from wealthy neighbor Mrs. Claybourne (Diana Webster). Her evidence? Well, for starters, John is the only visitor that Mrs. Claybourne has had in weeks--and even more damning, he has suddenly and inexplicably come into a large sum of money. Too angry and proud to defend himself, John is on the verge of a lengthy jail term until the truth is revealed in a surprising fashion. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Courtship Having lost his job in Cincinnati, Olivia's 64-year-old uncle Cody Nelson (Eduard Franz) relocates to Walton's Mountain. Hoping to alleviate Cody's loneliness, John-Boy (Richard Thomas) tries to play matchmaker between his uncle and local resident Cordelia Hunnicutt (Danna Hansen). But Olivia and Grandma staunchly disapprove of this romance, labelling Cordelia as "unsuitable" for poor, innocent Cody--after all, the brazen woman has been married and divorced four times! ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Gift A post-Andy Griffith Show, pre-Happy Days Ron Howard) guest stars as Seth Turner, the best friend of Jason Walton (Jon Walmsley). Seth has always wanted to learn to play an instrument in his father's band, but it looks as if he won't have the time; he has been diagnosed with leukemia. The concept of death--and the unfairness of it all--is an extremely difficult one for Jason to accept, and it is up to Grandpa to help the boy through this crisis. Featured in the cast as Dr. McIvers is Ron Howard's father Rance Howard. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Heritage John (Ralph Waite) is torn between financial considerations and concern for his children's birthright when he is offered $25,000 for Walton's Mountain by a developer (Noah Beery Jr.) who wants to build a tourist resort. Of course, John needs the money--but does he need THAT much money? (A fine question to be asking oneself in the middle of a Depression!) Meanwhile, Grandpa (Will Geer) and Grandma (Ellen Corby) prepare for their Golden wedding anniversary. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Five Foot Shelf Feeling sorry for travelling book salesman George Reed (Ben Piazza), Olivia (Michael Learned) makes a sizeable deposit on the "Five-Foot Shelf" collection, consisting of fifty "Harvard Classics." When he finds out that Reed has spent the money to buy his little girl a doll, John (Ralph Waite) is outraged and orders the peddler off Walton's Mountain, never to return. But this doesn't answer the episode's burning question: Will Olivia pony up a second deposit when those fifty books are delivered to the Walton doorstep? ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Graduation The Walton family spends a great deal of money to purchase a new suit of clothes for John-Boy's high school graduation. But when their cow suddenly dies, the Waltons desperately need ready cash to replace the bovine. Will John-Boy (Richard Thomas) stubbornly hold on to his graduation suit, or will he do the Right Thing and sell it back? Without revealing the ending, it can be noted that Grandpa Walton (Will Geer) comes to the rescue. Featured in the supporting cast is child actor Jeff Cotler, the brother of series regular Kami Cotler (Elizabeth). ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Car Hoping to obtain an automobile before heading off to college, John-Boy (Richard Thomas) does repair work for neighbor Hyder Rudge (Ed Lauter) in exchange for Rudge's old car. But when time comes for John-Boy to collect, Rudge refuses to part with his car, and even pretends that he no longer owns the vehicle. It soon becomes obvious that Rudge has broken his word in a desperate effort to cling to his past...and to the memory of someone who will never return. This is the final episode of The Waltons' second season. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Cradle No sooner has Olivia (Michael Learned) taken a job as a door-to-door salesman to help make ends meet in the Walton home than she discovers she is pregnant...again. As John (Ralph Waite) wonders if the family can afford another child, his youngest daughter Elizabeth (Kami Cotler) makes no secret of her disappointment over being supplanted as the "baby" of the family. Ultimately, the family comes to accept what seems to be The Inevitable--and then an unexpected plot twist puts the situation in a whole new light. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Fulfillment Once again, the Waltons play host to blacksmith Curtis Norton and his city-bred bride Ann, characters introduced in the first-season episode "The Bicycle" (Ivy Jones returns as Ann, while Victor French takes over from Ned Beatty as Curtis). But the news the Nortons bring with them is far from good: they have been told that they can never have children. At the same time, embittered eight-year-old orphan Stevie (Tiger Williams) is also staying with the Waltons. In any other TV series, this situation would immediately culminate in a happy ending, with the Nortons adopting Stevie--but in this case, Ann Norton is none too keen about adopting anyone. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Ghost Story The Walton kids purchase a Ouija board from storekeeper Ike (Joe Conley), and immediately set about to contact the spirit world. Though Olivia (Michael Learned) and Grandma (Ellen Corby) regard this activity as diametrically opposed to their religious beliefs, the kids' friend Luke (Kristopher Marquis) hopes that the board will help him communicate with his deceased mother. Sure enough, an unseen force seems to be guiding the children's hands as they spell out an ominous message, warning Luke to cancel a planned train trip--and not long afterward, word arrives that the train has crashed! ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Honeymoon After 19 years of marriage, John (Ralph Waite) and Olivia (Michael Learned) are finally able to go on their honeymoon to Virginia Beach...or so they think. When they are forced to spend the money they'd saved for the trip on emergency repairs, the rest of the family pitches in to raise the cash all over again. Alas, even after the couple is on their way to the coast, disaster continues dogging their trail--and back home, things aren't going so well for John-Boy (Richard Thomas) either. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Waltons: The Awakening Although she is becoming increasingly infirm and hard of hearing, Grandma Walton (Ellen Corby) stubbornly refuses to see a doctor. Grandma's intractability is more or less mirrored by 14-year-old Mary Ellen Walton (Judy Norton-Taylor), who wakes up one morning determined never again to be treated like a child. Unfortunately, Mary Ellen's declaration of independence may have negative results when she falls in love with a much-older college boy (James Carroll Jordan). The episode's closing narration clues us in to what the future holds in store for Mary Ellen--information which completely contradicts what will actually occur in such later Waltons episodes and TV-movies like Mother's Day on Walton's Mountain! ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide
  • G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero: The Complete Series

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Nov 10, 2009

    Includes:G.I. Joe: Twenty Questions (1985) G.I. Joe: Eye For an Eye (1985) G.I. Joe: The Traitor, Part Two (1985) G.I. Joe: Skeleton in the Closet (1985) G.I. Joe: Countdown for Zartan (1985) G.I. Joe: No Place Like Springfield, Part Two (1985) G.I. Joe: No Place Like Springfield, Part One (1985) G.I. Joe: The Great Alaskan Land Rush (1985) G.I. Joe: The Invaders (1985) G.I. Joe: The Wrong Stuff (1985) G.I. Joe: The Pit of Vipers (1985) G.I. Joe: Memories of Mara (1985) G.I. Joe: Pyramid of Darkness, Part Three (1985) G.I. Joe: Pyramid of Darkness, Part Two (1985) G.I. Joe: Operation Mind Menace (1985) G.I. Joe: The Funhouse (1985) G.I. Joe: Cobra's Creatures (1985) G.I. Joe: Jungle Trap (1985) G.I. Joe: Cobra Stops the World (1985) G.I. Joe: Satellite Down (1985) G.I. Joe: Red Rocket's Glare (1985) G.I. Joe: Cobra Soundwaves (1985) G.I. Joe: Money to Burn (1985) G.I. Joe: Cobra's Candidate (1985) G.I. Joe: Lights! Camera! Cobra! (1985) G.I. Joe: The Phantom Brigade (1985) G.I. Joe: The Synthoid Conspiracy, Part Two (1985) G.I. Joe: The Synthoid Conspiracy, Part One (1985) G.I. Joe: Haul Down the Heavens (1985) G.I. Joe: The Greenhouse Effect (1985) G.I. Joe: Spell of the Siren (1985) G.I. Joe: The Viper is Coming (1985) G.I. Joe: The Germ (1985) G.I. Joe: The Battle for the Train of Gold (1985) G.I. Joe: Pyramid of Darkness, Part Four (1985) G.I. Joe: Pyramid of Darkness, Part One (1985) G.I. Joe: Lasers in the Night (1985) G.I. Joe: The Gamesmaster (1985) G.I. Joe: Where the Reptiles Roam (1985) G.I. Joe: Hearts and Cannons (1985) G.I. Joe: Flint's Vacation (1985) G.I. Joe: Primordial Plot (1985) G.I. Joe: The Gods Below (1985) G.I. Joe: Cobra CLAWs are Coming to Town (1985) G.I. Joe: Eau de Cobra (1985) G.I. Joe: Excalibur (1985) G.I. Joe: Bazooka Saw a Sea Serpent (1985) G.I. Joe: Cobra Quake (1985) G.I. Joe: Pyramid of Darkness, Part Five (1985) G.I. Joe: Cold Slither (1985) G.I. Joe: The Traitor, Part One (1985) G.I. Joe: Worlds Without End, Part Two (1985) G.I. Joe: Captives of Cobra, Part One (1985) G.I. Joe: Worlds Without End, Part One (1985) G.I. Joe: Captives of Cobra, Part Two (1985) G.I. Joe: Grey Hair and Growing Pains (1986) G.I. Joe: In the Presence of Mine Enemies (1986) G.I. Joe: Sins of Our Fathers (1986) G.I. Joe: Joe's Night Out (1986) G.I. Joe: Second Hand Emotions (1986) G.I. Joe: Nightmare Assault (1986) G.I. Joe: The Most Dangerous Thing in the World (1986) G.I. Joe: G.I. Joe and the Golden Fleece (1986) G.I. Joe: Ninja Holiday (1986) G.I. Joe: Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Part Five (1986) G.I. Joe: Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Part Four (1986) G.I. Joe: Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Part Three (1986) G.I. Joe: Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Part Two (1986) G.I. Joe: Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Part One (1986) G.I. Joe: The Spy That Rooked Me (1986) G.I. Joe: Glamour Girls (1986) G.I. Joe: Cobrathon (1986) G.I. Joe: Sink the Montana (1986) G.I. Joe: Raise the Flagg! (1986) G.I. Joe: My Brother's Keeper (1986) G.I. Joe: Iceberg Goes South (1986) G.I. Joe: The Rotten Egg (1986) G.I. Joe: Million Dollar Medic (1986) G.I. Joe: Once Upon a Joe... (1986) G.I. Joe: Let's Play Soldier (1986) G.I. Joe: Computer Complications (1986) G.I. Joe: Last Hour to Doomsday (1986) G.I. Joe: My Favorite Things (1986) G.I. Joe: Into Your Tent I Will Silently Creep (1986) G.I. Joe: Not a Ghost of a Chance (1986) G.I. Joe: Twenty Questions The Joe team's war games are interrupted by Hector Ramirez, muckraking host of the TV series "Twenty Questions." Ramirez has brought along a peacenik named Arnold, who claims that the Joes are frauds who use the threat of Cobra attack as a means to cheat the American taxpayers. Hoping to prove Arnold wrong, Shipwreck conducts an unauthorized tour of the Joes' headquarters -- only to discover that Arnold is really the evil Baroness in disguise. Written by Buzz Dixon, "Twenty Questions" made its American TV debut on October 2, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Eye For an Eye A fierce battle between the Cobras and the Joes has devastating consequences on a family of innocent bystanders. Though his loved ones are safe, Charles Fairmont is enraged over the destruction of his home. Invading the Joes' base in search of revenge, Fairmont finds an unexpected ally in the form of Lady Jaye, who feels personally responsible for the man's plight. Written by Steve Mitchell and Barbara Petty, "Eye for an Eye" made its American TV debut on November 8, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Traitor, Part Two In the conclusion of a two-part adventure, the Joes have rescued Dusty from prison, certain that his traitorous behavior was borne of desperation over the plight of his sick mother. But can Dusty be reformed, and will he prove a valuable member of the Joe team? Apparently not: When Cobra tries to test its new mind-control gas on the Joes, Dusty assists the villains every step of the way. Be assured, however, that the story is not quite over yet. Written by Buzz Dixon, part two of the "The Traitor" originally aired in America on November 26, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Skeleton in the Closet Upon receiving an inheritance, Joe member Lady Jaye journeys to her ancestral home in Scotland. Feeling that something is amiss, LJ soon learns the awful truth: She is related to her longtime enemy Destro. The ensuing battle royal between the Joes and Cobras turns out to be the result of a carefully mapped scheme by another old enemy. A neat twist caps this episode, which was written by Flint Dille. "Skeleton in the Closet" first aired in America on December 11, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Countdown for Zartan Zartan is hired by Cobra Commander to blow up a peace conference at World Wide Defense Center, thereby covering up secret information about Cobra's terrorist activities. Posing as a kidnapped French scientist, Zartan is exposed by Joe member Spirit -- who is promptly abducted by Storm Shadow. The other members of the Joe Team race against the clock to locate and disarm Zartan's bomb. Written by Christy Marx, "Countdown for Zartan" first aired in America on September 23, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: No Place Like Springfield, Part Two In the concluding chapter of a two-part story, Shipwreck finally realizes that his "new" life as a family man in the town of Springfield is actually a sham, created by Cobra to force him to reveal the deadly water-to-explosive formula locked in his subconscious. Rescued from madness by Polly, Shipwreck does his best to foil Cobra's plans -- if only he can locate the rest of the Joe Team. But there's a tragic price to pay for the good guys' ultimate victory. Written by Steve Gerber, "No Place Like Springfield, Pt. 2" first aired in America on December 13, 1985, as the final episode of G.I. Joe's first TV season. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: No Place Like Springfield, Part One In the first episode of a two-part adventure, Dr. Melany's new formula for changing water into explosive is planted in Shipwreck's subconscious -- and only Lady Jaye knows the code word that will release the formula. Upon awakening from an unusually deep sleep, Shipwreck discovers that several years have passed, and that his has settled down to a cozy domestic existence with his wife, Mara (formerly a mermaid), and his daughter. Slowly but surely, however, Shipwreck senses that something is not quite right about his new surroundings. Written by Steve Gerber, "No Place Like Springfield, Pt. 1" first aired in America on December 12, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Great Alaskan Land Rush Claiming to a have found a legal loophole in Seward's Alaskan purchase of 1867, Cobra and a shifty used car dealer named Gorgy Potemkin gain full control of Alaska. Their plans include using the 49th state as a power base to attack the rest of the world. Once again, the Joes join forces with the Soviet Oktober Guard to foil Cobra's scheme. Written by David Carren, "The Great Alaskan Land Rush" was first telecast in America on December 3, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Invaders Both the U.S. and the U.S.S.R. are held in thrall by an apparent alien invasion of Earth. It soon develops, however, that the "invasion" has been orchestrated by Cobra, as part of a scheme to destroy both Moscow and Washington and establish Cobra as the world's only superpower. This time around, the Joes are joined by their Soviet counterparts, the Oktober Guard, in thwarting the villain's plans. Written by Dennis O'Neil, "The Invaders" originally aired in America on November 29, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Wrong Stuff Could it be that writers Stanley Ralph Ross and Flint Dille had a certain Atlanta-based TV mogul in mind when they wrote this episode of G.I. Joe? On this occasion, Cobra removes all space satellites from orbit, the better to create a worldwide broadcasting monopoly, Cobra Network Television. By offering twisted "message" sitcoms like "Father's No Beast" and even (horrors!) changing the endings of classic old films, the CTN is aimed at controlling the minds of all earthlings -- or at least, all cable subscribers. "The Wrong Stuff" first aired in America on November 28, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Pit of Vipers The G.I. Joe team is placed under the command of the new super-computer Watchdog, which has ostensibly been designed to seek out Cobra targets. Little do the heroes realize that Watchdog has been created by the Cobras themselves, and is programmed to send the Joes far off the beaten track, leaving their headquarters vulnerable to Cobra's deadly Pit Viper attacks. James M. Ward wrote the script, from an original story by Flint Dille. "The Pit of Vipers" originally aired in the U.S. on November 27, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Memories of Mara The titular Mara is a blue-skinned women whom we first see wearing a Cobra diving suit. Rescued by Joe Team member Shipwreck, Mara reveals that she is the half-human, half-fish result of a misfire Cobra experiment aimed at enabling humans to remain underwater indefinitely. With Mara's help, the Joes try to locate the U.S.S. Nerka, a submarine stolen by Cobra. Written by Sharman Di Vono, "Memories of Mara" first aired in the U.S. on November 15, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Pyramid of Darkness, Part Three In the third episode of the five-part |Pyramid of Darkness, Joe Team members Lady Jaye, Flint, Shipwreck, and Snake Eyes have managed to escape the perils presented them in the previous episode, "Rendezvous in the City of the Dead." A new ally is introduced in the form of a sexy nightclub singer named Satin. Cobra functionary Zartan manages to activate the control cubes, setting off a chain events culminating in a dangerous encounter with killer seals on an iceberg. Written by Ron Friedman, "Three Cubes to Darkness" first aired in America on September 18, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Pyramid of Darkness, Part Two In the second episode of the five-part |Pyramid of Darkness, the G.I. Joe team leads a counteroffensive against Cobra in hopes of regaining Space Station Delta. Joe members Shipwreck and Snake-Eyes are able to steal some of the all-important control cubes and a laser weapon, leading to a near-fatal escapade in a volcano called the Devil's Playground. Meanwhile, the dreaded Dreadnoks delighting in tormenting the captured Joes who have been forced into slave labor on Delta. Written by Ron Friedman, Rendezvous in the City of the Dead first aired in America on September 17, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Operation Mind Menace Taking control of the minds of several innocent civilians, Cobra artificially expands their powers, organizing his captives into an offensive army. Among these new mind-slaves is Tommy, the brother of G.I. Joe team member Airborne. Racing to Tommy's rescue, Airborne and Flash soon find themselves in need of rescuing. Written by Martin Pasko, "Operation Mind Menace" made its American TV debut on October 15, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Funhouse Cobra makes no effort to hide the fact that it has kidnapped five of the world's top scientists. It is all part of Cobra Commander's scheme to wreak a terrible vengeance on the G.I. Joe team. Lured to a South American island, the Joes find themselves at the mercy of Cobra's booby traps in a simulated funhouse -- and never have a rollercoaster and shooting gallery seemed more sinister. Written by Steve Mitchell and Barbara Petty, "The Funhouse" first aired in the U.S. on October 1, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Cobra's Creatures This time, Cobra has gotten hold of a device called Hi-Freq, invented by one Dr. Lucifer. The device enables the villains to gain mind control over all the animals of the world. To test Hi-Freq, Cobra kidnaps G.I. Joe team members Mutt, Junkyard. and Ripcord as human guinea pigs. Meanwhile, the other Joes try to win over Dr. Lucifer by having Lady Jaye pose as the scientist's sweetheart, Dr. Attila. Written by Kimmer Ringwald, "Cobra's Creatures" made its first American TV appearance on September 30, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Jungle Trap In its efforts to harness the raw energy supplies in the center of the earth, Cobra kidnaps eminent scientist Dr. Shakoor. Forced to do Cobra's bidding, Shakoor devises the awesome Vulcan Machine. Meanwhile, the G.I. Joe team endeavors to rescue the missing scientist -- a task comparable to finding a needle in the world's largest haystack. Written by future Batman: The Animated Series maven Paul Dini, "Jungle Trap" originally aired in America on September 27, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Cobra Stops the World Cobra attempts to gain control of the world's fuel supplies so that the leaders of Earth will knuckle under to his demands. With each passing hour, Cobra utilizes his weaponry to destroy another oil tanker. The G.I. Joe teams races against the clock to track down the source of the destruction, and in the process, team members Duke and Ace find themselves imprisoned in an all-but-impenetrable jungle. Written by Steve Gerber, "Cobra Stops the World" first aired in America on September 26, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Satellite Down Breaker manages to force a G.I. Joe spy satellite stolen by Cobra to crash somewhere in the African jungle. Both the Joe and Cobra teams race into unchartered territory to recover the satellite, only to discover that the device has been adopted as a "god" by a lost tribe called the Primords. This episode contains a cute closing gag involving the Primords' reaction to that demon machine known as Television. Written by Ted Pederson, "Satellite Down" first aired in the U.S. on September 25, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Red Rocket's Glare Extensive Enterprises, a front organization for Cobra, uses a vicious gang of bikers to force the owners of the Red Rocket Drive-Thru Diners to sell out at bargain-basement prices. It is the first step in a scheme to install sophisticated anti-personnel weapons throughout the country. But Cobra has not taken into consideration the G.I. Joe team -- specifically, team member Roadblock, whose aunt and uncle own one of the beleaguered Red Rocket restaurants. Written by Mary Skrenes, "Red Rocket's Glare" originally aired in the U.S. on September 24, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Cobra Soundwaves This time, Cobra has gotten hold of an anti-aircraft gun which emits sonic waves for sinister purposes. Acting quickly, the villains threaten to use the weapon to destroy the oil resources of a Middle Eastern nation. But the G.I. Joe team has likewise swung into action, and they're not about to be "soundly" beaten by the Cobra forces. Written by Ted Pederson, "Cobra Soundwaves" originally aired in America on October 17, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Money to Burn Cobra destroys America's economy by vaporizing all of the country's money. He then takes steps to gain complete control by distributing his own personalized currency. To counteract this financial disaster, G.I. Joe team member Lady Jaye poses as Cobra's filthy-rich "client" Gloria Vonderhoss. Making its first American television appearance on October 14, 1985 (a few weeks later in some local markets), "Money to Burn" was written by Roger Slifer. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Cobra's Candidate In the midst of a heated political campaign, Cobra Commander hopes to sway voters to his handpicked candidate, Robert Harper, by casting Harper in the role of persecuted underdog. To that end, Cobra enlists the aid of a tough street gang, who stages riots which appear to be the handiwork of Harper's opponent, Whittier Greenway. The plan is foiled when a hitherto unsupsected link between the street gang and the G.I. Joe team is revealed. Written by Gordon Kent, "Cobra's Candidate" originally aired in the U.S. on October 11, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Lights! Camera! Cobra! Several of the G.I. Joe team's more contentious members are hired as technical advisors for the Hollywood epic "The G.I. Joe Story." Striving for realism, the producers have stored several authentic Joe and Cobra weapons in their prop shed, including a genuine Cobra Firebat plane. In his efforts to steal the plane, Cobra commander must rely upon the mercurial Destro and the unpredictable Dreadnoks. The story outcome is determined by the studio's crack team of special effects wizards. Written by Buzz Dixon, "Lights! Camera! Cobra!" first aired in the U.S. on October 10, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Phantom Brigade Cobra Commander uses an elderly gypsy woman to conjure up three dangerous ghosts: a Roman legionnaire, a Mongol warrior, and an American WWI flying ace. He then sends them into battle against the G.I. Joe team, secure in the knowledge that phantoms can't be killed or injured. The Joes attempt to mount a counteroffensive by appealing to the dormant patriotism of the American ghost. Written by Sharman Di Vono, "The Phantom Brigade" originally aired in America on October 9, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Synthoid Conspiracy, Part Two In the conclusion of a two-part story, Cobra has managed to cut off funding for the G.I. Joe team with the use of his Synthoids, humanlike creatures programmed to do the villains' bidding. Even worse, Joe member Duke has been replaced by his Synthoid clone. Managing to escape Cobra's clutches, Duke links up with his fellow Joes in an effort to stem the Synthoid invasion -- receiving unexpected assistance in the form of the evil Destro, who is again locked in a power struggle with his Cobra bosses. Written by Christy Marx, "The Synthoid Conspiracy, Pt. 2" first aired in America on October 8, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Synthoid Conspiracy, Part One In the first episode of a two-part story, Cobra infiltrates the committee responsible for funding the activities of the G.I. Joe team. The villains replace several key members with lookalike Synthoid, which have been programmed to bend exclusively to Cobra's will. Not only do the Joes lose their financial base, but to make matters worse, team member Duke is likewise replaced by a lookalike Synthoid. Written by Christy Marx, "The Synthoid Conspiracy, Pt. 1" first aired in America on October 7, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Haul Down the Heavens Cobra encamps itself at the North Pole, the better to use the powerful Ion Attractor to melt the polar ice cap and upset the ecological balance of the earth. To prevent this, G.I. Joe team members Flint, Lady Jaye, and Snow Job, together with a group of scientists, head to the Arctic, only to find out that the villains are more than prepared for such a counteroffensive. The episode's highlight is Lady Jaye's tone-deaf rendition of the U.S. Marine Hymn. Written by television cartoon veteran Buzz Dixon, "Haul Down the Heavens" originally aired in America on October 4, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Greenhouse Effect A non-polluting rocket fuel that causes plants to grow to enormous size is stolen by a member of the Crimson Guards. Chortling in glee, Cobra leader Destro plans to use the fuel to create an army of killer plants. The episode's climax is a bizarre, gargantuan "food fight" between the Cobras and the G.I. Joe team. Written by Gordon Kent, "The Greenhouse Effect" made its first American TV appearance on October 3, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Spell of the Siren The Baroness hatches another scheme to take over Cobra. Her first step is to harness the power of the Conch of the Siren to hypnotize the male team members of both the Cobras and the Joes. Inevitably, it is up to the female Joes -- and a few stray unaffected males who had been off base during the Siren's aural assault -- to rescue their comrades. Written by Gerry and Carla Conway, "Spell of the Siren" was first broadcast in America on October 25, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Viper is Coming Responding to what they think are cryptic challenges from Cobra, the G.I. Joe team, led by Barbecue, heads to various parts of the world, armed for battle. Only after the dust is settled do they realize that it's all a false alarm. The climax of David Carren's teleplay was obviously inspired by one of the oldest and most familiar schoolyard jokes in academic history. "The Viper Is Coming" originally aired in America on October 24, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Germ A member of the Crimson Guard steals a vial containing Bacteria X. The usual red tape delays delivery of this vial to Destro. In the meantime, the Bacteria X is accidentally mixed with a new growth serum, resulting in a huge, gelatine monstrosity. The G.I. Joe team tries to destroy this hideous new threat, only to succeeding in doubling the danger at hand. Roger Slifer's script is a sly parody of the classic horror cheapie The Blob -- and what an ending! "The Germ" originally aired in America on October 23, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Battle for the Train of Gold Stealing a cassette containing the blueprints of Fort Knox, Cobra concocts a scheme to rob the gold treasury. At the behest of the Bureau of Engraving, the G.I. Joe team works undercover and awaits Cobra's inevitable strike. Though the villains succeed in disabling the Joes' vehicles and weapons, the good guys are able to borrow several of Kentucky's best thoroughbred racing horses during the final counteroffensive. Written by David Carren, "The Battle for the Train of Gold" first aired in America on October 16, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Pyramid of Darkness, Part Four In the fourth episode of the five-part |Pyramid of Darkness, Bazooka and Alpine are rescued by martial artist Quick-Kick, who is prompted recruited into the G.I. Joe team. Continuing in their efforts to regain control of Space Station Delta from Cobra, the Joes end up in a graveyard of sunken ships called the Sea of Lost Souls. Unfortunately, the Cobra team manages to retrieve all four of the elusive control cubes, enabling them to form the all-powerful Pyramid which will give Cobra absolute control of the world -- and the means to destroy G.I. Joe once and for all. Written by Ron Friedman, "Chaos in the Sea of Lost Souls" first aired in America on September 19, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Pyramid of Darkness, Part One Two years after the introductory cartoon miniseries G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero and one year after the following miniseries G.I. Joe: The Revenge of Cobra, the daily animated G.I. Joe series proper commenced with part one of the five-episode adventure |Pyramids of Darkness. The opening chapter, "The Further Adventures of G.I. Joe," was written by Ron Friedman, and was seen in most American markets on September 16, 1985. Things get off to a rousing start as the evil organization Cobra gains control of the G.I. Joe team's Delta space station, using Delta's weapon system to attack Joe headquarters and jam all of earth's electrical devices. Crucial to the action are four control cubes, which when placed in alignment create an all-powerful Pyramid, with which Cobras hopes to rule the world. "The Further Adventures of G.I. Joe" includes such trapping as a wild chase through Enterprise City and a flock of tribble-like creatures called the Fatal Fluffies, who can turn really bad in the wrong hands. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Lasers in the Night Cobra Commander draws up plans to steal the G.I. Joe team's new laser device. The theft is not so much for power as for ego; the Commander intends to create a monument to himself on the Moon. Meanwhile, a romance develops between Quick-Kick and pretty Joe Team trainee Amber, who, predictably, ends up being used as a pawn by the villains. Written by Marv Wolfman, "Lasers in the Night" was originally telecast in America on October 22, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Gamesmaster G.I. Joe team members Lady Jaye and Flint, together with their deadly rivals Cobra Commander and the Baroness, are captured en masse by a looney named the Gamesmaster. The four enemies must join forces to stay alive during a (literal) manhunt on Gamesmaster's gadget-laden private island, which looks deceptively like a huge amusement park. Flint Dille's teleplay was obviously inspired by the classic Richard Connell short story The Most Dangerous Game. "The Gamesmaster" originally aired in the U.S. on October 21, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Where the Reptiles Roam A dude ranch in Western Texas is purchased by one of Cobra's dummy corporations. G.I. Joe team member Wild Bill and his friends now have their hands full trying to keep Cobra from gaining control of the solar energy farm next door to the ranch. When Cobra's weapons prove too powerful, Wild Bill cannily relies upon the unharnessed energy of a good old-fashioned cattle stampede. Written by Gerry and Carla Conway, "Where the Reptiles Roam" first aired in the U.S. on October 18, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Hearts and Cannons G.I. Joes Footloose and Dusty infiltrate Cobra's desert base, where captured scientist Dr. Nancy Winters is being forced to work on a powerful new Plasma Cannon Tank. Rescuing Nancy, the two Joes spend as much time vying for her affections as they do preventing Cobra from putting the Tank into operation. And what about that contentious local character named Jabal? Scripted by Alfred A. Pegel and Larry Houston from a story by Pegel, "Hearts and Cannons" was first broadcast in America on November 14, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Flint's Vacation Joe Team member Flint heads to the new housing project of Please Cove, hoping to spend some quality time with his cousin's family. He soon discovers that the project's inhabitants have been brainwashed and enslaved by Cobra -- and the dreaded Drednoks have been pressed into service as the local police force. Beth Bornstein's teleplay cleverly redefines the old sci-fi film classic Invasion of the Body Snatchers in TV-cartoon terms. "Flint's Vacation" was first telecast in America on November 13, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Primordial Plot Cobra steals a cache of petrified bones, then kidnaps cloning expert Dr. Massey. The result is a newly hatched crop of deadly dinosaurs, which even the Joes are at a loss to contain. And remember, folks, this was several years before the release of Spielberg's Jurassic Park. "Primordial Plot" was written by Donald F. Glut, one of the finest science fiction purveyors working in television. The episode originally aired in America on November 12, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Gods Below Once again, Cobra Commander is in need of quick cash to finance his world-domination scheme. To that end, the Commander lures the Joes into a treasure hunt at the newly excavated tomb of Osiris in Egypt. Things get complicated when the Joes and scientist Dr. Marsh are confronted by the evil Egyptian God Set, who sends them hurtling into the Realm of the Dead. Written by Gordon Kent, "The Gods Below" first aired in America on November 11, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Cobra CLAWs are Coming to Town Christmas is coming and the Joes take upon themselves to distribute used toys to needy children. Unfortunately, the toy supply is infiltrated by Cobra's troops, who have been shrunken to action-figure size. In this reduced state, the villains contrive to sway public sentiment against the good-guy Joes. When all is said and done, however, this episode exists primarily to introduce Hasbro's latest line of G.I. Joe toy products. Scripted by Carla and Gerry Conway from a story by Roy and Dan Thomas, "Cobra CLAWs are Coming to Town" originally aired in America on November 7, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Eau de Cobra The title of this G.I. Joe episode refers to a new brand of perfume, sweet to the smell, but devastating in its effect. The Baroness hopes to ensnare wealthy shipowner Socrates Arties by applying the perfume, which turns males into mind slaves. Alas, the ensuing passions get wildly out of control, thanks to a jealous Destro. Written by Flint Dille, "Eau de Cobra" made its first American TV appearance on November 6, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Excalibur Crash-landing in England's Lake District, Storm Shadow recovers the long-lost Sword Excalibur. This arouses the interest of Destro, who begins laying plans to seize the sword for his own use. Meanwhile, the Joes attempt to forestall future Cobra attacks on England, a task made difficult by the country's habitually unpredictable weather. Written by Dan DiStefano, "Excalibur" first aired in America on November 1, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Bazooka Saw a Sea Serpent Cobra has developed a mechanical sea serpent, which grows in size each time it devours a ship. Unfortunately, the villains lose control of the metallic monstrosity. Swallowing Cobras and Joes alike, the renegade serpent starts making a beeline for helpless New York City. Beany and Cecil this isn't! Written by Mary Skenes, "Bazooka Saw a Sea Serpent" was first telecast in America on October 31, 1985 -- perfect timing for a Halloween prank. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Cobra Quake A new technology has been developed to stop earthquakes before they begin. Cobra reverses that technology, intending to wreak havoc at a Third World Council peace conference in Japan. Assigned to guard the delegates, the Joes end up in a desperate search for Cobra's booby traps in three different, far-flung locations. Written by Ted Pederson, "Cobra Quake" made its first American TV appearance on October 28, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Pyramid of Darkness, Part Five In the concluding episode of the five-part Pyramid of Darkness, Cobra has successfully assembled the Pyramid, which will give them absolute and unquestioned power over the world. Fortunately, the G.I. Joe team manages to escape Cobra's clutches, bearing up against all manner of deadly devices, including an immobilizing heat beam. As the episode races to a conclusion, the viewer is never entirely certain who will emerge triumphant (hint: the coda finds the villains in their characteristic "It's all your fault" mode). Written by Ron Friedman, "Knotting Cobra's Coils" first aired in America on September 20, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Cold Slither The Cobra Commander makes a startling discovery: He can no longer continue his efforts to rule the world because he is flat broke. Hoping to raise money in a hurry, the Commander utilizes the "hidden persuasion" method by hiring Zartan and the Drednoks to pose as musicians, then inserts mind-control messages in the music in order to enslave the group's fans. Alas, even three Joe members fall victim to the booby-trapped tunes. Something of a self-parody, this G.I. Joe episode was written by Charles Michael Hill. Though filmed as the final episode of season one, "Cold Slither" was telecast on December 2, 1985, long before the season finale. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Traitor, Part One In the first episode of a two-part story, a desperate Dusty is coerced into selling information about the G.I. Joes' new bullet-proof chemical armor protection. The recipient of this top-secret information is Cobra, who has promised to pay the medical bills for Dusty's ailing mother. Arrested for treason, Dusty is sprung from prison by the Joes themselves, who believe that extenuating circumstance and not treachery motivated the prisoner's rash actions. But is Dusty genuinely a victim of circumstance, or a villain in disguise? Written by Buzz Dixon, part one of "The Traitor" first aired in America on November 25, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Worlds Without End, Part Two In the conclusion of the two-part "Worlds Without End," Joe team members Flint, Lady Jaye, Airtight, Grunt, Clutch, and Steeler are still trapped in a parallel Earth, still at the mercy of the conquering Cobras. The Joes receive unexpected help from their old nemesis the Baroness -- who has been reinvented as a "good guy," in love with Steeler. Adopting a divide-and-conquer approach, the Baroness and the Joes foment a Cobra civil war. When the dust settles, three of the Joes choose to remain in the parallel world to continue fighting the good fight on behalf of their new confreres. Written by Martin Pasko, part two of "Worlds Without End" first aired in America on November 5, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Captives of Cobra, Part One In the first episode of a two-part story, Cobra kidnaps the family members of the G.I. Joe team, including the parents of Quick Kick, Thunder, and Scarlett. Using mind control, the villains turn their captives against the Joes. It is all part of a scheme to steal some highly explosive crystals created by a misfire chemical reaction. First telecast in America on October 29, 1985, part one of "Captives of Cobra" was written by G.I. Joe stalwart Christy Marx. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Worlds Without End, Part One In this first episode of a two-part adventure, Joe team members Flint, Lady Jaye, Airtight, Grunt, Clutch, and Steeler try to recover a matter transmutor stolen by the Dreadnoks. When the device is accidentally triggered, the Joes are hurled into a bizarre parallel world. Upon getting their bearings, they discover that, in this particular world, the Cobras have emerged triumphant over the Joes -- and the Drednoks are now the police force. Written by Martin Pasko, part one of "Worlds Without End" first aired in America on November 4, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Captives of Cobra, Part Two In the conclusion of a two-part story, several family members of the G.I. Joe team are still being held prisoner by Cobra, who hope to use their captives to retrieve some dangerously explosive chemicals. Team member Scarlett is able to rescue some of the captives -- who, because their minds have been enslaved by Cobra, prove to be almost as dangerous as their captors. Meanwhile, the villains overreach themselves by attempting to nab the extremely self-reliant family of Joe member Gung Ho. Written by Christy Marx, part two of "Captives of Cobra" was originally telecast in America on October 30, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Grey Hair and Growing Pains Serpentor steals Madame Versailles' special formula for making people younger -- or, if used improperly, making them older. Intending to exploit the treatment for his own evil purposes, Serpentor is unwittingly helped along by the vanity of Mme. Versailles' commercial spokespersons. In the course of events, three of the Joes age 50 years, another three team members regress into childhood, and Zarina and Mainframe stage a deadly confrontation. Written by Dave Marconi and Flint Dille, "Grey Hair and Growing Pains" first aired in America on October 14, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: In the Presence of Mine Enemies Joe Team member Slip Stream finds himself stranded on a monster-infested island with a beautiful female StratoViper named Raven. At first, the two natural enemies devote their energies to wiping one another out. But Raven changes her mind when she discovers that she has been set up as a "dead duck" by her leader, the Cobra Commander. Written by Chris Weber and Karen Wilson, "In the Presence of Mine Enemies" originally aired in America on November 19, 1986, as the final second-season episode of G.I. Joe. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Sins of Our Fathers Dismissed from the Joe Team, Dial-Tone is unwittingly plunked in the middle of another power struggle between Cobra Commander and Serpentor. The action shifts to Scotland, ending up at Destro's ancestral castle. Both Joes and Cobras are forced to fight side by side when they are threatened by a horrible monster, summoned from the past. Scripted by Buzz Dixon from a story by Steve Gerber, "Sins of Our Fathers" first aired in America on November 18, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Joe's Night Out Three of the Joes -- Wet Suit, Leatherneck, and Dial-Tone -- accompany their dates to the opening of a trendy new night club. They are subsequently abducted along with all the other patrons when the "club" turns out to be a rocket in disguise, courtesy of Cobra. Hurled into deep space, the hostages will be returned only on condition that research scientist Dr. Melany assist Cobra in developing a powerful new plane engine. First broadcast in America on November 10, 1986, "Joe's Night Out" was written by David Schwartz. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Second Hand Emotions Dr. Mindbender and Serpentor develop an electronic organ capable of manipulating emotions. The villains play the organ at the wedding of LifeLine's sister, hoping thereby to force the Joe Team members into destroying themselves. Something old, something new, something borrowed, and something blue (blew up, that is). Written by Carla and Gerry Conway, "Second Hand Emotions" made its first U.S. television appearance on October 31, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Nightmare Assault The latest Cobra device for deviltry is something called the Somulator. Deploying this device, Dr. Mindbender is able to enter and alter the dreams of the Joe Team members, causing horrible nightmares which result in carelessness and a drop in morale. But the "good" doctor himself falls victim to LowLife's all-too-vivid nightmare, consisting of the combined dreams of the other Joes. Written by Marv Wolfman, "Nightmare Assault" originally aired in America on October 30, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Most Dangerous Thing in the World During General Hawk's absence, Cobra wreaks havoc upon the Joe's computer system. As a result, the troublesome Shipwreck, LifeLine, and Dial-Tone are promoted to the rank of General. Needless to say, the trio is hardly officer material, and it is up to Hawk to undo the ensuing damage -- and to save the weakened Joe force from an all-out Cobra attack. Written by Buzz Dixon, "The Most Dangerous Thing in the World" first aired in America on October 29, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: G.I. Joe and the Golden Fleece At the Suez Canal, the Cobras attempt to recover a valuable golden coil from the wreckage of a crashed UFO. They are confronted by the Joes, and in the ensuing struggle a laser beam is accidentally triggered. Within seconds, Joes and Cobras alike a hurtled back in time to ancient Greece, where they are welcomed and worshipped as gods. Scripted by Richard Merwin from a story by Flint Dille, "G.I. Joe and the Golden Fleece" first aired in the U.S. on October 27, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Ninja Holiday Attending a martial arts competition, Joe Team member Sgt. Slaughter is "chosen" by a group of sinister ninjas for a special assignment. Unwillingly submitting himself to rigorous training, Sarge discovers that he has been selected to assassinate Cobra Emperor Serpentor. During the climactic chase, the Joe team faces opposition from a variety of martial-arts experts, many of whom are dressed like Village People rejects! Written by Michael Charles Hill, "Ninja Holiday" originally aired in the U.S. on October 22, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Part Five In the concluding chapter of a five-part adventure, the worst has happened: Dr. Mindbender has successfully melded the DNA of several past conquerors into a single, super-powered Cobra Emperor named Serpentor. Fortunately, Sgt. Slaughter and the rest of the G.I. Joe team manage to escape their Cobra captors and to mount a counteroffensive. Without giving away the ending, it can be noted that enough Joe and Cobra members are left standing to populate the subsequent episodes of G.I. Joe's second TV season. Written by Buzz Dixon, "Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Pt. 5" first aired in America on September 19, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Part Four In the fourth chapter of a five-part adventure, Cobra has successfully captured several members of the new G.I. Joe team. Dr. Mindbender is now certain that he can continue his plans to create a powerful Cobra Emperor named Serpentor unimpeded. Altering his scheme a bit, Mindbender is now determined to use Sgt. Slaughter's DNA in the creation process. Written by Buzz Dixon, "Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Pt. 4" first aired in America on September 18, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Part Three In the third chapter of a five-part adventure, the Joes run into danger in all corners of the world. Beach Head and Mainframe encounter trouble at Dracula's castles; Duke is jeopardized at Genghis Khan's tomb; Shipwreck is nearly scuttled at Alexander the Great's underwater crypt; and Sgt. Slaughter is captured near Sun Tzu's burial mound. On the "plus" side, the Joes finally discover that Cobra intends to use the DNA from past conquerors to create an omnipotent Cobra Emperor named Serpentor. Written by Buzz Dixon, "Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Pt. 3" first aired in America on September 17, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Part Two In the second chapter of a five-part adventure, the new G.I. Joe team scurries all over the world, trying to prevent Cobra from raiding the sacred resting places of such past leaders as Napoleon, Alexander the Great, and Ivan the Terrible. The heroes run into a great deal of interference, not only from Cobra but also from local politicians and bureaucrats. Meanwhile, Dr. Mindbender begins the process of assembling the new, all-powerful Cobra Emperor Serpentor. Written by Buzz Dixon, "Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Pt. 2" first aired in America on September 16, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Part One Season two of G.I. Joe was launched in America on September 15, 1986, with the first episode of the five-part adventure |Arise, Serpentor, Arise. Fed up with Cobra Commander's bungling, Dr. Mindbender decides to create a new, all-powerful Cobra Emperor, using the DNA of such past conquerers as Napoleon, Genghis Khan, Alexander the Great, Ivan the Terrible, and Sun Tzu. It is up to the brand-new G.I. Joe team to stop Mindbender in his tracks, but first, they have to figure out exactly what he is up to. "Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Pt. 1" was written by Buzz Dixon. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Spy That Rooked Me Also known as "The Spy Who Rooked Me," this episode focuses on a world-famous, Bond-like secret agent named Matthew Burke. After rescuing Joe team members Flint, Lady Jaye, Dial-Tone, and Cross-Country, Burke agrees to help them deliver some deadly nerve gas -- and, incidentally, to elude the diabolical Dr. Mindbender. Alas, Burke is so wrapped up in his own mistake that he nearly messes up the mission. Written with tongue firmly in cheek by Susan K. Williams, "The Spy That Rooked Me" originally aired in America on October 13, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Glamour Girls Desperately desiring eternal youth, Madame Veil relies upon the sinister resourcefulness of Cobra. The villains kidnap dozens of beautiful fashion models, intending to tap their youthfulness on behalf of Mme. Veil. The Joes go to the rescue, receiving unexpected help from one of the abducted models: Lowlight's own sister Una. Beth Bornstein's teleplay is more than a little beholden to the Georges Franju horror film Eyes Without a Face, especially near the end of the story. "Glamour Girls" made its American TV debut on October 8, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Cobrathon Cobra is in dire need of an expensive computer virus designed to cripple the records of law enforcement agencies throughout the world. But rather than pay for the device in the normal fashion, the villains choose to put on a pay-per-view telethon, staged in a hellish casino. In this perverse twist on the Jerry Lewis oeuvre, the telethon's "entertainment" includes the ritual torture of Joe members Sci-Fi and Lifeline. Written by Martin Pasko and Rebecca Parr, "Cobrathon" first aired in America on October 6, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Sink the Montana The unexpected catalyst for this episode is Admiral George Lattimer of the U.S. Navy. Unwilling to allow his beloved USS Montana to be scrapped, the admiral joins force with Cobra's Destro turns against the United States. The Joes must prevent Lattimer from using his obsolete but still-deadly battleship from destroying the entire Atlantic Fleet. Written by David Carren, "Sink the Montana" first aired in America on September 29, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Raise the Flagg! The Joes and the Cobras race against other to salvage the remains of the sunken aircraft carrier U.S.S. Flagg. The Joes get to the wreckage first, only to discover it is inhabited by a demented Cobra chef. In addition to deadly gastronomic efforts, the Joes must also contend with some BATs and an antimatter energy pod. Written by David Carren, "Raise the Flagg!" made its first American TV appearance on October 20, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: My Brother's Keeper Wheelchair-bound physicist Jeremy Penser allows himself to be duped by Cobra. In exchange for regaining the use of his legs, Dr. Penser agrees to help develop Cobra's latest weapon of destruction. So blindsided does Penser become that he nearly seals the doom of his own younger brother Timothy -- not to mention practically every member of the G.I. Joe team. Written by Buzz Dixon, "My Brother's Keeper" originally aired in America on October 15, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Iceberg Goes South Joe Team member Iceberg visits his girlfriend, Mahia, at her uncle's "Tropodome," a tropical biodome. Little does he suspect that Cobra's Dr. Mindbender is using the building as headquarters for his latest batch of diabolical genetic experiments. By the time the rest of the Joes show up, Iceberg has been converted into a hideous mutant. Written by Mary Skrenes, "Iceberg Goes South" first aired in America on October 9, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Rotten Egg Invited to be the guest of honor at a military academy, Leatherneck discovers that the institution is under the command of Cobra. Worse still, the head of the academy is a fugitive criminal named McCann -- who, as a raw Marine grunt, had been trained by Leatherneck at Parris Island. Seeking revenge for being booted from the service, Leatherneck is determined to use his own military strategy to destroy his former mentor. Written by Steve Mitchell and Barbara Petty, "The Rotten Egg" originally aired in America on October 7, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Million Dollar Medic LifeLine rescues Bree Van Mark, daughter of a wealthy industrialist, from a watery grave. To show her gratitude, Bree showers the reluctant LifeLine with expensive gifts -- including a gold-plated helicopter. Inevitably, the girl becomes a pawn in the latest Cobra scheme. Celebrated cartoon voice-over director Susan Blu is heard as Bree. Written by Carla and Gerry Conway, "Million Dollar Medic" first aired in America on October 2, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Once Upon a Joe... During a pitched battle between the Cobras and the Joes, an orphanage is accidentally destroyed, though the children emerge unscathed. As a new building is constructed, Shipwreck tries to keep the kids entertained, all the while endeavoring to prevent Zartan from recovering a lost Cobra weapon, the mysterious McGuffin Device (scriptwriter Buzz Dixon certainly knows his Hitchcock). The plot is partially resolved by orphan girl Jenny, who in many respects is quicker on the uptake than the Joes. "Once Upon a Joe..." originally aired in the U.S. on October 1, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Let's Play Soldier In Bangkok, Leatherneck takes charge of four "dust children," street orphans fathered by American GIs. Meanwhile, Cobra tries to enslave the population of Thailand by distributing chewing gum laced with Dr. Mindbender's latest mind-paralysis drug. As if that wasn't enough of a complication, the duplicitous Zarana leads the G.I. Joe team into another trap. Written by Sharman Di Vono, "Let's Play Soldier" first aired in the U.S. on September 30, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Computer Complications Cobra operative Zarana breaks into Joe headquarters, there to steal an antimatter deposit. Her plans are altered when she meets and falls in love with Joe team member Mainframes. Orders are orders, and Zarana has been ordered to kill Mainframe. David Schwartz's teleplay is chock-full of clever and unexpected plot twists. "Computer Complications" was first telecast in America on September 26, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Last Hour to Doomsday Cobra's latest weapon is the Vortex Cone, which plays havoc with the ocean's magnetic currents to cause huge tidal waves all over the world. Thus armed, the Cobra leader threatens to wipe out the entire East Coast if his demands are not meant. In their efforts to foil the villains, the Joe Teams deploys such strategies as having Lady Jaye impersonate the Baroness. Written by Tom Degenais, "Last Hour to Doomsday" originally aired in America on September 25, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: My Favorite Things Serpentor leads a band of Cobras in stealing the historical relics which, when assembled, form the DNA for Serpentor's personality matrix. The villains' problem: They must wrest these relics away from the even nastier despots who currently possess them. Meanwhile, Joe team member Wet-Suit learns a valuable lesson about self-control -- and nearly meets disaster in the castle of the original Count Dracula. Written by Doug Booth, "My Favorite Things" originally aired in America on October 16, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Into Your Tent I Will Silently Creep Joe team member Cross Country stumbles upon a Cobra slave labor camp. The captives are toiling on behalf of Cobra Commander, who needs enough money to thwart Serpentor's latest power play. The story's "maguffin" is a missing computer disk, over which a lot of fuss is stirred. Some good "mutant" character design and animation distinguishes this episode, which was written by Buzz Dixon and Michael Charles Hill. "Into Your Tent I Will Silently Creep" was the final episode of G.I. Joe, though not the final one to be telecast: Its original American air date was November 20, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Not a Ghost of a Chance Three Cobra members go on Hector Ramirez's TV show "Twenty Questions," ostensibly to clear themselves of charges that he destroyed the prototype for a new stealth bomber. Meanwhile, the Joes try to rescue the bombers' missing pilots. Their efforts -- and the ultimate unmasking of Cobra as the scoundrels that they really are -- is almost undermined by Joe team member Flint's personal demons. Written by Sharmon Di Vono, "Not a Ghost of a Chance" was first telecast in America on November 13, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide
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