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    A Michael Buble Christmas

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Dec 6, 2011

    Michael Buble performs in this new special.
  • G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero: The Complete Series

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Nov 10, 2009

    Includes:G.I. Joe: Twenty Questions (1985) G.I. Joe: Eye For an Eye (1985) G.I. Joe: The Traitor, Part Two (1985) G.I. Joe: Skeleton in the Closet (1985) G.I. Joe: Countdown for Zartan (1985) G.I. Joe: No Place Like Springfield, Part Two (1985) G.I. Joe: No Place Like Springfield, Part One (1985) G.I. Joe: The Great Alaskan Land Rush (1985) G.I. Joe: The Invaders (1985) G.I. Joe: The Wrong Stuff (1985) G.I. Joe: The Pit of Vipers (1985) G.I. Joe: Memories of Mara (1985) G.I. Joe: Pyramid of Darkness, Part Three (1985) G.I. Joe: Pyramid of Darkness, Part Two (1985) G.I. Joe: Operation Mind Menace (1985) G.I. Joe: The Funhouse (1985) G.I. Joe: Cobra's Creatures (1985) G.I. Joe: Jungle Trap (1985) G.I. Joe: Cobra Stops the World (1985) G.I. Joe: Satellite Down (1985) G.I. Joe: Red Rocket's Glare (1985) G.I. Joe: Cobra Soundwaves (1985) G.I. Joe: Money to Burn (1985) G.I. Joe: Cobra's Candidate (1985) G.I. Joe: Lights! Camera! Cobra! (1985) G.I. Joe: The Phantom Brigade (1985) G.I. Joe: The Synthoid Conspiracy, Part Two (1985) G.I. Joe: The Synthoid Conspiracy, Part One (1985) G.I. Joe: Haul Down the Heavens (1985) G.I. Joe: The Greenhouse Effect (1985) G.I. Joe: Spell of the Siren (1985) G.I. Joe: The Viper is Coming (1985) G.I. Joe: The Germ (1985) G.I. Joe: The Battle for the Train of Gold (1985) G.I. Joe: Pyramid of Darkness, Part Four (1985) G.I. Joe: Pyramid of Darkness, Part One (1985) G.I. Joe: Lasers in the Night (1985) G.I. Joe: The Gamesmaster (1985) G.I. Joe: Where the Reptiles Roam (1985) G.I. Joe: Hearts and Cannons (1985) G.I. Joe: Flint's Vacation (1985) G.I. Joe: Primordial Plot (1985) G.I. Joe: The Gods Below (1985) G.I. Joe: Cobra CLAWs are Coming to Town (1985) G.I. Joe: Eau de Cobra (1985) G.I. Joe: Excalibur (1985) G.I. Joe: Bazooka Saw a Sea Serpent (1985) G.I. Joe: Cobra Quake (1985) G.I. Joe: Pyramid of Darkness, Part Five (1985) G.I. Joe: Cold Slither (1985) G.I. Joe: The Traitor, Part One (1985) G.I. Joe: Worlds Without End, Part Two (1985) G.I. Joe: Captives of Cobra, Part One (1985) G.I. Joe: Worlds Without End, Part One (1985) G.I. Joe: Captives of Cobra, Part Two (1985) G.I. Joe: Grey Hair and Growing Pains (1986) G.I. Joe: In the Presence of Mine Enemies (1986) G.I. Joe: Sins of Our Fathers (1986) G.I. Joe: Joe's Night Out (1986) G.I. Joe: Second Hand Emotions (1986) G.I. Joe: Nightmare Assault (1986) G.I. Joe: The Most Dangerous Thing in the World (1986) G.I. Joe: G.I. Joe and the Golden Fleece (1986) G.I. Joe: Ninja Holiday (1986) G.I. Joe: Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Part Five (1986) G.I. Joe: Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Part Four (1986) G.I. Joe: Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Part Three (1986) G.I. Joe: Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Part Two (1986) G.I. Joe: Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Part One (1986) G.I. Joe: The Spy That Rooked Me (1986) G.I. Joe: Glamour Girls (1986) G.I. Joe: Cobrathon (1986) G.I. Joe: Sink the Montana (1986) G.I. Joe: Raise the Flagg! (1986) G.I. Joe: My Brother's Keeper (1986) G.I. Joe: Iceberg Goes South (1986) G.I. Joe: The Rotten Egg (1986) G.I. Joe: Million Dollar Medic (1986) G.I. Joe: Once Upon a Joe... (1986) G.I. Joe: Let's Play Soldier (1986) G.I. Joe: Computer Complications (1986) G.I. Joe: Last Hour to Doomsday (1986) G.I. Joe: My Favorite Things (1986) G.I. Joe: Into Your Tent I Will Silently Creep (1986) G.I. Joe: Not a Ghost of a Chance (1986) G.I. Joe: Twenty Questions The Joe team's war games are interrupted by Hector Ramirez, muckraking host of the TV series "Twenty Questions." Ramirez has brought along a peacenik named Arnold, who claims that the Joes are frauds who use the threat of Cobra attack as a means to cheat the American taxpayers. Hoping to prove Arnold wrong, Shipwreck conducts an unauthorized tour of the Joes' headquarters -- only to discover that Arnold is really the evil Baroness in disguise. Written by Buzz Dixon, "Twenty Questions" made its American TV debut on October 2, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Eye For an Eye A fierce battle between the Cobras and the Joes has devastating consequences on a family of innocent bystanders. Though his loved ones are safe, Charles Fairmont is enraged over the destruction of his home. Invading the Joes' base in search of revenge, Fairmont finds an unexpected ally in the form of Lady Jaye, who feels personally responsible for the man's plight. Written by Steve Mitchell and Barbara Petty, "Eye for an Eye" made its American TV debut on November 8, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Traitor, Part Two In the conclusion of a two-part adventure, the Joes have rescued Dusty from prison, certain that his traitorous behavior was borne of desperation over the plight of his sick mother. But can Dusty be reformed, and will he prove a valuable member of the Joe team? Apparently not: When Cobra tries to test its new mind-control gas on the Joes, Dusty assists the villains every step of the way. Be assured, however, that the story is not quite over yet. Written by Buzz Dixon, part two of the "The Traitor" originally aired in America on November 26, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Skeleton in the Closet Upon receiving an inheritance, Joe member Lady Jaye journeys to her ancestral home in Scotland. Feeling that something is amiss, LJ soon learns the awful truth: She is related to her longtime enemy Destro. The ensuing battle royal between the Joes and Cobras turns out to be the result of a carefully mapped scheme by another old enemy. A neat twist caps this episode, which was written by Flint Dille. "Skeleton in the Closet" first aired in America on December 11, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Countdown for Zartan Zartan is hired by Cobra Commander to blow up a peace conference at World Wide Defense Center, thereby covering up secret information about Cobra's terrorist activities. Posing as a kidnapped French scientist, Zartan is exposed by Joe member Spirit -- who is promptly abducted by Storm Shadow. The other members of the Joe Team race against the clock to locate and disarm Zartan's bomb. Written by Christy Marx, "Countdown for Zartan" first aired in America on September 23, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: No Place Like Springfield, Part Two In the concluding chapter of a two-part story, Shipwreck finally realizes that his "new" life as a family man in the town of Springfield is actually a sham, created by Cobra to force him to reveal the deadly water-to-explosive formula locked in his subconscious. Rescued from madness by Polly, Shipwreck does his best to foil Cobra's plans -- if only he can locate the rest of the Joe Team. But there's a tragic price to pay for the good guys' ultimate victory. Written by Steve Gerber, "No Place Like Springfield, Pt. 2" first aired in America on December 13, 1985, as the final episode of G.I. Joe's first TV season. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: No Place Like Springfield, Part One In the first episode of a two-part adventure, Dr. Melany's new formula for changing water into explosive is planted in Shipwreck's subconscious -- and only Lady Jaye knows the code word that will release the formula. Upon awakening from an unusually deep sleep, Shipwreck discovers that several years have passed, and that his has settled down to a cozy domestic existence with his wife, Mara (formerly a mermaid), and his daughter. Slowly but surely, however, Shipwreck senses that something is not quite right about his new surroundings. Written by Steve Gerber, "No Place Like Springfield, Pt. 1" first aired in America on December 12, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Great Alaskan Land Rush Claiming to a have found a legal loophole in Seward's Alaskan purchase of 1867, Cobra and a shifty used car dealer named Gorgy Potemkin gain full control of Alaska. Their plans include using the 49th state as a power base to attack the rest of the world. Once again, the Joes join forces with the Soviet Oktober Guard to foil Cobra's scheme. Written by David Carren, "The Great Alaskan Land Rush" was first telecast in America on December 3, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Invaders Both the U.S. and the U.S.S.R. are held in thrall by an apparent alien invasion of Earth. It soon develops, however, that the "invasion" has been orchestrated by Cobra, as part of a scheme to destroy both Moscow and Washington and establish Cobra as the world's only superpower. This time around, the Joes are joined by their Soviet counterparts, the Oktober Guard, in thwarting the villain's plans. Written by Dennis O'Neil, "The Invaders" originally aired in America on November 29, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Wrong Stuff Could it be that writers Stanley Ralph Ross and Flint Dille had a certain Atlanta-based TV mogul in mind when they wrote this episode of G.I. Joe? On this occasion, Cobra removes all space satellites from orbit, the better to create a worldwide broadcasting monopoly, Cobra Network Television. By offering twisted "message" sitcoms like "Father's No Beast" and even (horrors!) changing the endings of classic old films, the CTN is aimed at controlling the minds of all earthlings -- or at least, all cable subscribers. "The Wrong Stuff" first aired in America on November 28, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Pit of Vipers The G.I. Joe team is placed under the command of the new super-computer Watchdog, which has ostensibly been designed to seek out Cobra targets. Little do the heroes realize that Watchdog has been created by the Cobras themselves, and is programmed to send the Joes far off the beaten track, leaving their headquarters vulnerable to Cobra's deadly Pit Viper attacks. James M. Ward wrote the script, from an original story by Flint Dille. "The Pit of Vipers" originally aired in the U.S. on November 27, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Memories of Mara The titular Mara is a blue-skinned women whom we first see wearing a Cobra diving suit. Rescued by Joe Team member Shipwreck, Mara reveals that she is the half-human, half-fish result of a misfire Cobra experiment aimed at enabling humans to remain underwater indefinitely. With Mara's help, the Joes try to locate the U.S.S. Nerka, a submarine stolen by Cobra. Written by Sharman Di Vono, "Memories of Mara" first aired in the U.S. on November 15, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Pyramid of Darkness, Part Three In the third episode of the five-part |Pyramid of Darkness, Joe Team members Lady Jaye, Flint, Shipwreck, and Snake Eyes have managed to escape the perils presented them in the previous episode, "Rendezvous in the City of the Dead." A new ally is introduced in the form of a sexy nightclub singer named Satin. Cobra functionary Zartan manages to activate the control cubes, setting off a chain events culminating in a dangerous encounter with killer seals on an iceberg. Written by Ron Friedman, "Three Cubes to Darkness" first aired in America on September 18, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Pyramid of Darkness, Part Two In the second episode of the five-part |Pyramid of Darkness, the G.I. Joe team leads a counteroffensive against Cobra in hopes of regaining Space Station Delta. Joe members Shipwreck and Snake-Eyes are able to steal some of the all-important control cubes and a laser weapon, leading to a near-fatal escapade in a volcano called the Devil's Playground. Meanwhile, the dreaded Dreadnoks delighting in tormenting the captured Joes who have been forced into slave labor on Delta. Written by Ron Friedman, Rendezvous in the City of the Dead first aired in America on September 17, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Operation Mind Menace Taking control of the minds of several innocent civilians, Cobra artificially expands their powers, organizing his captives into an offensive army. Among these new mind-slaves is Tommy, the brother of G.I. Joe team member Airborne. Racing to Tommy's rescue, Airborne and Flash soon find themselves in need of rescuing. Written by Martin Pasko, "Operation Mind Menace" made its American TV debut on October 15, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Funhouse Cobra makes no effort to hide the fact that it has kidnapped five of the world's top scientists. It is all part of Cobra Commander's scheme to wreak a terrible vengeance on the G.I. Joe team. Lured to a South American island, the Joes find themselves at the mercy of Cobra's booby traps in a simulated funhouse -- and never have a rollercoaster and shooting gallery seemed more sinister. Written by Steve Mitchell and Barbara Petty, "The Funhouse" first aired in the U.S. on October 1, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Cobra's Creatures This time, Cobra has gotten hold of a device called Hi-Freq, invented by one Dr. Lucifer. The device enables the villains to gain mind control over all the animals of the world. To test Hi-Freq, Cobra kidnaps G.I. Joe team members Mutt, Junkyard. and Ripcord as human guinea pigs. Meanwhile, the other Joes try to win over Dr. Lucifer by having Lady Jaye pose as the scientist's sweetheart, Dr. Attila. Written by Kimmer Ringwald, "Cobra's Creatures" made its first American TV appearance on September 30, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Jungle Trap In its efforts to harness the raw energy supplies in the center of the earth, Cobra kidnaps eminent scientist Dr. Shakoor. Forced to do Cobra's bidding, Shakoor devises the awesome Vulcan Machine. Meanwhile, the G.I. Joe team endeavors to rescue the missing scientist -- a task comparable to finding a needle in the world's largest haystack. Written by future Batman: The Animated Series maven Paul Dini, "Jungle Trap" originally aired in America on September 27, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Cobra Stops the World Cobra attempts to gain control of the world's fuel supplies so that the leaders of Earth will knuckle under to his demands. With each passing hour, Cobra utilizes his weaponry to destroy another oil tanker. The G.I. Joe teams races against the clock to track down the source of the destruction, and in the process, team members Duke and Ace find themselves imprisoned in an all-but-impenetrable jungle. Written by Steve Gerber, "Cobra Stops the World" first aired in America on September 26, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Satellite Down Breaker manages to force a G.I. Joe spy satellite stolen by Cobra to crash somewhere in the African jungle. Both the Joe and Cobra teams race into unchartered territory to recover the satellite, only to discover that the device has been adopted as a "god" by a lost tribe called the Primords. This episode contains a cute closing gag involving the Primords' reaction to that demon machine known as Television. Written by Ted Pederson, "Satellite Down" first aired in the U.S. on September 25, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Red Rocket's Glare Extensive Enterprises, a front organization for Cobra, uses a vicious gang of bikers to force the owners of the Red Rocket Drive-Thru Diners to sell out at bargain-basement prices. It is the first step in a scheme to install sophisticated anti-personnel weapons throughout the country. But Cobra has not taken into consideration the G.I. Joe team -- specifically, team member Roadblock, whose aunt and uncle own one of the beleaguered Red Rocket restaurants. Written by Mary Skrenes, "Red Rocket's Glare" originally aired in the U.S. on September 24, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Cobra Soundwaves This time, Cobra has gotten hold of an anti-aircraft gun which emits sonic waves for sinister purposes. Acting quickly, the villains threaten to use the weapon to destroy the oil resources of a Middle Eastern nation. But the G.I. Joe team has likewise swung into action, and they're not about to be "soundly" beaten by the Cobra forces. Written by Ted Pederson, "Cobra Soundwaves" originally aired in America on October 17, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Money to Burn Cobra destroys America's economy by vaporizing all of the country's money. He then takes steps to gain complete control by distributing his own personalized currency. To counteract this financial disaster, G.I. Joe team member Lady Jaye poses as Cobra's filthy-rich "client" Gloria Vonderhoss. Making its first American television appearance on October 14, 1985 (a few weeks later in some local markets), "Money to Burn" was written by Roger Slifer. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Cobra's Candidate In the midst of a heated political campaign, Cobra Commander hopes to sway voters to his handpicked candidate, Robert Harper, by casting Harper in the role of persecuted underdog. To that end, Cobra enlists the aid of a tough street gang, who stages riots which appear to be the handiwork of Harper's opponent, Whittier Greenway. The plan is foiled when a hitherto unsupsected link between the street gang and the G.I. Joe team is revealed. Written by Gordon Kent, "Cobra's Candidate" originally aired in the U.S. on October 11, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Lights! Camera! Cobra! Several of the G.I. Joe team's more contentious members are hired as technical advisors for the Hollywood epic "The G.I. Joe Story." Striving for realism, the producers have stored several authentic Joe and Cobra weapons in their prop shed, including a genuine Cobra Firebat plane. In his efforts to steal the plane, Cobra commander must rely upon the mercurial Destro and the unpredictable Dreadnoks. The story outcome is determined by the studio's crack team of special effects wizards. Written by Buzz Dixon, "Lights! Camera! Cobra!" first aired in the U.S. on October 10, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Phantom Brigade Cobra Commander uses an elderly gypsy woman to conjure up three dangerous ghosts: a Roman legionnaire, a Mongol warrior, and an American WWI flying ace. He then sends them into battle against the G.I. Joe team, secure in the knowledge that phantoms can't be killed or injured. The Joes attempt to mount a counteroffensive by appealing to the dormant patriotism of the American ghost. Written by Sharman Di Vono, "The Phantom Brigade" originally aired in America on October 9, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Synthoid Conspiracy, Part Two In the conclusion of a two-part story, Cobra has managed to cut off funding for the G.I. Joe team with the use of his Synthoids, humanlike creatures programmed to do the villains' bidding. Even worse, Joe member Duke has been replaced by his Synthoid clone. Managing to escape Cobra's clutches, Duke links up with his fellow Joes in an effort to stem the Synthoid invasion -- receiving unexpected assistance in the form of the evil Destro, who is again locked in a power struggle with his Cobra bosses. Written by Christy Marx, "The Synthoid Conspiracy, Pt. 2" first aired in America on October 8, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Synthoid Conspiracy, Part One In the first episode of a two-part story, Cobra infiltrates the committee responsible for funding the activities of the G.I. Joe team. The villains replace several key members with lookalike Synthoid, which have been programmed to bend exclusively to Cobra's will. Not only do the Joes lose their financial base, but to make matters worse, team member Duke is likewise replaced by a lookalike Synthoid. Written by Christy Marx, "The Synthoid Conspiracy, Pt. 1" first aired in America on October 7, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Haul Down the Heavens Cobra encamps itself at the North Pole, the better to use the powerful Ion Attractor to melt the polar ice cap and upset the ecological balance of the earth. To prevent this, G.I. Joe team members Flint, Lady Jaye, and Snow Job, together with a group of scientists, head to the Arctic, only to find out that the villains are more than prepared for such a counteroffensive. The episode's highlight is Lady Jaye's tone-deaf rendition of the U.S. Marine Hymn. Written by television cartoon veteran Buzz Dixon, "Haul Down the Heavens" originally aired in America on October 4, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Greenhouse Effect A non-polluting rocket fuel that causes plants to grow to enormous size is stolen by a member of the Crimson Guards. Chortling in glee, Cobra leader Destro plans to use the fuel to create an army of killer plants. The episode's climax is a bizarre, gargantuan "food fight" between the Cobras and the G.I. Joe team. Written by Gordon Kent, "The Greenhouse Effect" made its first American TV appearance on October 3, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Spell of the Siren The Baroness hatches another scheme to take over Cobra. Her first step is to harness the power of the Conch of the Siren to hypnotize the male team members of both the Cobras and the Joes. Inevitably, it is up to the female Joes -- and a few stray unaffected males who had been off base during the Siren's aural assault -- to rescue their comrades. Written by Gerry and Carla Conway, "Spell of the Siren" was first broadcast in America on October 25, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Viper is Coming Responding to what they think are cryptic challenges from Cobra, the G.I. Joe team, led by Barbecue, heads to various parts of the world, armed for battle. Only after the dust is settled do they realize that it's all a false alarm. The climax of David Carren's teleplay was obviously inspired by one of the oldest and most familiar schoolyard jokes in academic history. "The Viper Is Coming" originally aired in America on October 24, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Germ A member of the Crimson Guard steals a vial containing Bacteria X. The usual red tape delays delivery of this vial to Destro. In the meantime, the Bacteria X is accidentally mixed with a new growth serum, resulting in a huge, gelatine monstrosity. The G.I. Joe team tries to destroy this hideous new threat, only to succeeding in doubling the danger at hand. Roger Slifer's script is a sly parody of the classic horror cheapie The Blob -- and what an ending! "The Germ" originally aired in America on October 23, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Battle for the Train of Gold Stealing a cassette containing the blueprints of Fort Knox, Cobra concocts a scheme to rob the gold treasury. At the behest of the Bureau of Engraving, the G.I. Joe team works undercover and awaits Cobra's inevitable strike. Though the villains succeed in disabling the Joes' vehicles and weapons, the good guys are able to borrow several of Kentucky's best thoroughbred racing horses during the final counteroffensive. Written by David Carren, "The Battle for the Train of Gold" first aired in America on October 16, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Pyramid of Darkness, Part Four In the fourth episode of the five-part |Pyramid of Darkness, Bazooka and Alpine are rescued by martial artist Quick-Kick, who is prompted recruited into the G.I. Joe team. Continuing in their efforts to regain control of Space Station Delta from Cobra, the Joes end up in a graveyard of sunken ships called the Sea of Lost Souls. Unfortunately, the Cobra team manages to retrieve all four of the elusive control cubes, enabling them to form the all-powerful Pyramid which will give Cobra absolute control of the world -- and the means to destroy G.I. Joe once and for all. Written by Ron Friedman, "Chaos in the Sea of Lost Souls" first aired in America on September 19, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Pyramid of Darkness, Part One Two years after the introductory cartoon miniseries G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero and one year after the following miniseries G.I. Joe: The Revenge of Cobra, the daily animated G.I. Joe series proper commenced with part one of the five-episode adventure |Pyramids of Darkness. The opening chapter, "The Further Adventures of G.I. Joe," was written by Ron Friedman, and was seen in most American markets on September 16, 1985. Things get off to a rousing start as the evil organization Cobra gains control of the G.I. Joe team's Delta space station, using Delta's weapon system to attack Joe headquarters and jam all of earth's electrical devices. Crucial to the action are four control cubes, which when placed in alignment create an all-powerful Pyramid, with which Cobras hopes to rule the world. "The Further Adventures of G.I. Joe" includes such trapping as a wild chase through Enterprise City and a flock of tribble-like creatures called the Fatal Fluffies, who can turn really bad in the wrong hands. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Lasers in the Night Cobra Commander draws up plans to steal the G.I. Joe team's new laser device. The theft is not so much for power as for ego; the Commander intends to create a monument to himself on the Moon. Meanwhile, a romance develops between Quick-Kick and pretty Joe Team trainee Amber, who, predictably, ends up being used as a pawn by the villains. Written by Marv Wolfman, "Lasers in the Night" was originally telecast in America on October 22, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Gamesmaster G.I. Joe team members Lady Jaye and Flint, together with their deadly rivals Cobra Commander and the Baroness, are captured en masse by a looney named the Gamesmaster. The four enemies must join forces to stay alive during a (literal) manhunt on Gamesmaster's gadget-laden private island, which looks deceptively like a huge amusement park. Flint Dille's teleplay was obviously inspired by the classic Richard Connell short story The Most Dangerous Game. "The Gamesmaster" originally aired in the U.S. on October 21, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Where the Reptiles Roam A dude ranch in Western Texas is purchased by one of Cobra's dummy corporations. G.I. Joe team member Wild Bill and his friends now have their hands full trying to keep Cobra from gaining control of the solar energy farm next door to the ranch. When Cobra's weapons prove too powerful, Wild Bill cannily relies upon the unharnessed energy of a good old-fashioned cattle stampede. Written by Gerry and Carla Conway, "Where the Reptiles Roam" first aired in the U.S. on October 18, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Hearts and Cannons G.I. Joes Footloose and Dusty infiltrate Cobra's desert base, where captured scientist Dr. Nancy Winters is being forced to work on a powerful new Plasma Cannon Tank. Rescuing Nancy, the two Joes spend as much time vying for her affections as they do preventing Cobra from putting the Tank into operation. And what about that contentious local character named Jabal? Scripted by Alfred A. Pegel and Larry Houston from a story by Pegel, "Hearts and Cannons" was first broadcast in America on November 14, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Flint's Vacation Joe Team member Flint heads to the new housing project of Please Cove, hoping to spend some quality time with his cousin's family. He soon discovers that the project's inhabitants have been brainwashed and enslaved by Cobra -- and the dreaded Drednoks have been pressed into service as the local police force. Beth Bornstein's teleplay cleverly redefines the old sci-fi film classic Invasion of the Body Snatchers in TV-cartoon terms. "Flint's Vacation" was first telecast in America on November 13, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Primordial Plot Cobra steals a cache of petrified bones, then kidnaps cloning expert Dr. Massey. The result is a newly hatched crop of deadly dinosaurs, which even the Joes are at a loss to contain. And remember, folks, this was several years before the release of Spielberg's Jurassic Park. "Primordial Plot" was written by Donald F. Glut, one of the finest science fiction purveyors working in television. The episode originally aired in America on November 12, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Gods Below Once again, Cobra Commander is in need of quick cash to finance his world-domination scheme. To that end, the Commander lures the Joes into a treasure hunt at the newly excavated tomb of Osiris in Egypt. Things get complicated when the Joes and scientist Dr. Marsh are confronted by the evil Egyptian God Set, who sends them hurtling into the Realm of the Dead. Written by Gordon Kent, "The Gods Below" first aired in America on November 11, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Cobra CLAWs are Coming to Town Christmas is coming and the Joes take upon themselves to distribute used toys to needy children. Unfortunately, the toy supply is infiltrated by Cobra's troops, who have been shrunken to action-figure size. In this reduced state, the villains contrive to sway public sentiment against the good-guy Joes. When all is said and done, however, this episode exists primarily to introduce Hasbro's latest line of G.I. Joe toy products. Scripted by Carla and Gerry Conway from a story by Roy and Dan Thomas, "Cobra CLAWs are Coming to Town" originally aired in America on November 7, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Eau de Cobra The title of this G.I. Joe episode refers to a new brand of perfume, sweet to the smell, but devastating in its effect. The Baroness hopes to ensnare wealthy shipowner Socrates Arties by applying the perfume, which turns males into mind slaves. Alas, the ensuing passions get wildly out of control, thanks to a jealous Destro. Written by Flint Dille, "Eau de Cobra" made its first American TV appearance on November 6, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Excalibur Crash-landing in England's Lake District, Storm Shadow recovers the long-lost Sword Excalibur. This arouses the interest of Destro, who begins laying plans to seize the sword for his own use. Meanwhile, the Joes attempt to forestall future Cobra attacks on England, a task made difficult by the country's habitually unpredictable weather. Written by Dan DiStefano, "Excalibur" first aired in America on November 1, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Bazooka Saw a Sea Serpent Cobra has developed a mechanical sea serpent, which grows in size each time it devours a ship. Unfortunately, the villains lose control of the metallic monstrosity. Swallowing Cobras and Joes alike, the renegade serpent starts making a beeline for helpless New York City. Beany and Cecil this isn't! Written by Mary Skenes, "Bazooka Saw a Sea Serpent" was first telecast in America on October 31, 1985 -- perfect timing for a Halloween prank. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Cobra Quake A new technology has been developed to stop earthquakes before they begin. Cobra reverses that technology, intending to wreak havoc at a Third World Council peace conference in Japan. Assigned to guard the delegates, the Joes end up in a desperate search for Cobra's booby traps in three different, far-flung locations. Written by Ted Pederson, "Cobra Quake" made its first American TV appearance on October 28, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Pyramid of Darkness, Part Five In the concluding episode of the five-part Pyramid of Darkness, Cobra has successfully assembled the Pyramid, which will give them absolute and unquestioned power over the world. Fortunately, the G.I. Joe team manages to escape Cobra's clutches, bearing up against all manner of deadly devices, including an immobilizing heat beam. As the episode races to a conclusion, the viewer is never entirely certain who will emerge triumphant (hint: the coda finds the villains in their characteristic "It's all your fault" mode). Written by Ron Friedman, "Knotting Cobra's Coils" first aired in America on September 20, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Cold Slither The Cobra Commander makes a startling discovery: He can no longer continue his efforts to rule the world because he is flat broke. Hoping to raise money in a hurry, the Commander utilizes the "hidden persuasion" method by hiring Zartan and the Drednoks to pose as musicians, then inserts mind-control messages in the music in order to enslave the group's fans. Alas, even three Joe members fall victim to the booby-trapped tunes. Something of a self-parody, this G.I. Joe episode was written by Charles Michael Hill. Though filmed as the final episode of season one, "Cold Slither" was telecast on December 2, 1985, long before the season finale. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Traitor, Part One In the first episode of a two-part story, a desperate Dusty is coerced into selling information about the G.I. Joes' new bullet-proof chemical armor protection. The recipient of this top-secret information is Cobra, who has promised to pay the medical bills for Dusty's ailing mother. Arrested for treason, Dusty is sprung from prison by the Joes themselves, who believe that extenuating circumstance and not treachery motivated the prisoner's rash actions. But is Dusty genuinely a victim of circumstance, or a villain in disguise? Written by Buzz Dixon, part one of "The Traitor" first aired in America on November 25, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Worlds Without End, Part Two In the conclusion of the two-part "Worlds Without End," Joe team members Flint, Lady Jaye, Airtight, Grunt, Clutch, and Steeler are still trapped in a parallel Earth, still at the mercy of the conquering Cobras. The Joes receive unexpected help from their old nemesis the Baroness -- who has been reinvented as a "good guy," in love with Steeler. Adopting a divide-and-conquer approach, the Baroness and the Joes foment a Cobra civil war. When the dust settles, three of the Joes choose to remain in the parallel world to continue fighting the good fight on behalf of their new confreres. Written by Martin Pasko, part two of "Worlds Without End" first aired in America on November 5, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Captives of Cobra, Part One In the first episode of a two-part story, Cobra kidnaps the family members of the G.I. Joe team, including the parents of Quick Kick, Thunder, and Scarlett. Using mind control, the villains turn their captives against the Joes. It is all part of a scheme to steal some highly explosive crystals created by a misfire chemical reaction. First telecast in America on October 29, 1985, part one of "Captives of Cobra" was written by G.I. Joe stalwart Christy Marx. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Worlds Without End, Part One In this first episode of a two-part adventure, Joe team members Flint, Lady Jaye, Airtight, Grunt, Clutch, and Steeler try to recover a matter transmutor stolen by the Dreadnoks. When the device is accidentally triggered, the Joes are hurled into a bizarre parallel world. Upon getting their bearings, they discover that, in this particular world, the Cobras have emerged triumphant over the Joes -- and the Drednoks are now the police force. Written by Martin Pasko, part one of "Worlds Without End" first aired in America on November 4, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Captives of Cobra, Part Two In the conclusion of a two-part story, several family members of the G.I. Joe team are still being held prisoner by Cobra, who hope to use their captives to retrieve some dangerously explosive chemicals. Team member Scarlett is able to rescue some of the captives -- who, because their minds have been enslaved by Cobra, prove to be almost as dangerous as their captors. Meanwhile, the villains overreach themselves by attempting to nab the extremely self-reliant family of Joe member Gung Ho. Written by Christy Marx, part two of "Captives of Cobra" was originally telecast in America on October 30, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Grey Hair and Growing Pains Serpentor steals Madame Versailles' special formula for making people younger -- or, if used improperly, making them older. Intending to exploit the treatment for his own evil purposes, Serpentor is unwittingly helped along by the vanity of Mme. Versailles' commercial spokespersons. In the course of events, three of the Joes age 50 years, another three team members regress into childhood, and Zarina and Mainframe stage a deadly confrontation. Written by Dave Marconi and Flint Dille, "Grey Hair and Growing Pains" first aired in America on October 14, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: In the Presence of Mine Enemies Joe Team member Slip Stream finds himself stranded on a monster-infested island with a beautiful female StratoViper named Raven. At first, the two natural enemies devote their energies to wiping one another out. But Raven changes her mind when she discovers that she has been set up as a "dead duck" by her leader, the Cobra Commander. Written by Chris Weber and Karen Wilson, "In the Presence of Mine Enemies" originally aired in America on November 19, 1986, as the final second-season episode of G.I. Joe. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Sins of Our Fathers Dismissed from the Joe Team, Dial-Tone is unwittingly plunked in the middle of another power struggle between Cobra Commander and Serpentor. The action shifts to Scotland, ending up at Destro's ancestral castle. Both Joes and Cobras are forced to fight side by side when they are threatened by a horrible monster, summoned from the past. Scripted by Buzz Dixon from a story by Steve Gerber, "Sins of Our Fathers" first aired in America on November 18, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Joe's Night Out Three of the Joes -- Wet Suit, Leatherneck, and Dial-Tone -- accompany their dates to the opening of a trendy new night club. They are subsequently abducted along with all the other patrons when the "club" turns out to be a rocket in disguise, courtesy of Cobra. Hurled into deep space, the hostages will be returned only on condition that research scientist Dr. Melany assist Cobra in developing a powerful new plane engine. First broadcast in America on November 10, 1986, "Joe's Night Out" was written by David Schwartz. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Second Hand Emotions Dr. Mindbender and Serpentor develop an electronic organ capable of manipulating emotions. The villains play the organ at the wedding of LifeLine's sister, hoping thereby to force the Joe Team members into destroying themselves. Something old, something new, something borrowed, and something blue (blew up, that is). Written by Carla and Gerry Conway, "Second Hand Emotions" made its first U.S. television appearance on October 31, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Nightmare Assault The latest Cobra device for deviltry is something called the Somulator. Deploying this device, Dr. Mindbender is able to enter and alter the dreams of the Joe Team members, causing horrible nightmares which result in carelessness and a drop in morale. But the "good" doctor himself falls victim to LowLife's all-too-vivid nightmare, consisting of the combined dreams of the other Joes. Written by Marv Wolfman, "Nightmare Assault" originally aired in America on October 30, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Most Dangerous Thing in the World During General Hawk's absence, Cobra wreaks havoc upon the Joe's computer system. As a result, the troublesome Shipwreck, LifeLine, and Dial-Tone are promoted to the rank of General. Needless to say, the trio is hardly officer material, and it is up to Hawk to undo the ensuing damage -- and to save the weakened Joe force from an all-out Cobra attack. Written by Buzz Dixon, "The Most Dangerous Thing in the World" first aired in America on October 29, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: G.I. Joe and the Golden Fleece At the Suez Canal, the Cobras attempt to recover a valuable golden coil from the wreckage of a crashed UFO. They are confronted by the Joes, and in the ensuing struggle a laser beam is accidentally triggered. Within seconds, Joes and Cobras alike a hurtled back in time to ancient Greece, where they are welcomed and worshipped as gods. Scripted by Richard Merwin from a story by Flint Dille, "G.I. Joe and the Golden Fleece" first aired in the U.S. on October 27, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Ninja Holiday Attending a martial arts competition, Joe Team member Sgt. Slaughter is "chosen" by a group of sinister ninjas for a special assignment. Unwillingly submitting himself to rigorous training, Sarge discovers that he has been selected to assassinate Cobra Emperor Serpentor. During the climactic chase, the Joe team faces opposition from a variety of martial-arts experts, many of whom are dressed like Village People rejects! Written by Michael Charles Hill, "Ninja Holiday" originally aired in the U.S. on October 22, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Part Five In the concluding chapter of a five-part adventure, the worst has happened: Dr. Mindbender has successfully melded the DNA of several past conquerors into a single, super-powered Cobra Emperor named Serpentor. Fortunately, Sgt. Slaughter and the rest of the G.I. Joe team manage to escape their Cobra captors and to mount a counteroffensive. Without giving away the ending, it can be noted that enough Joe and Cobra members are left standing to populate the subsequent episodes of G.I. Joe's second TV season. Written by Buzz Dixon, "Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Pt. 5" first aired in America on September 19, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Part Four In the fourth chapter of a five-part adventure, Cobra has successfully captured several members of the new G.I. Joe team. Dr. Mindbender is now certain that he can continue his plans to create a powerful Cobra Emperor named Serpentor unimpeded. Altering his scheme a bit, Mindbender is now determined to use Sgt. Slaughter's DNA in the creation process. Written by Buzz Dixon, "Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Pt. 4" first aired in America on September 18, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Part Three In the third chapter of a five-part adventure, the Joes run into danger in all corners of the world. Beach Head and Mainframe encounter trouble at Dracula's castles; Duke is jeopardized at Genghis Khan's tomb; Shipwreck is nearly scuttled at Alexander the Great's underwater crypt; and Sgt. Slaughter is captured near Sun Tzu's burial mound. On the "plus" side, the Joes finally discover that Cobra intends to use the DNA from past conquerors to create an omnipotent Cobra Emperor named Serpentor. Written by Buzz Dixon, "Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Pt. 3" first aired in America on September 17, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Part Two In the second chapter of a five-part adventure, the new G.I. Joe team scurries all over the world, trying to prevent Cobra from raiding the sacred resting places of such past leaders as Napoleon, Alexander the Great, and Ivan the Terrible. The heroes run into a great deal of interference, not only from Cobra but also from local politicians and bureaucrats. Meanwhile, Dr. Mindbender begins the process of assembling the new, all-powerful Cobra Emperor Serpentor. Written by Buzz Dixon, "Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Pt. 2" first aired in America on September 16, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Part One Season two of G.I. Joe was launched in America on September 15, 1986, with the first episode of the five-part adventure |Arise, Serpentor, Arise. Fed up with Cobra Commander's bungling, Dr. Mindbender decides to create a new, all-powerful Cobra Emperor, using the DNA of such past conquerers as Napoleon, Genghis Khan, Alexander the Great, Ivan the Terrible, and Sun Tzu. It is up to the brand-new G.I. Joe team to stop Mindbender in his tracks, but first, they have to figure out exactly what he is up to. "Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Pt. 1" was written by Buzz Dixon. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Spy That Rooked Me Also known as "The Spy Who Rooked Me," this episode focuses on a world-famous, Bond-like secret agent named Matthew Burke. After rescuing Joe team members Flint, Lady Jaye, Dial-Tone, and Cross-Country, Burke agrees to help them deliver some deadly nerve gas -- and, incidentally, to elude the diabolical Dr. Mindbender. Alas, Burke is so wrapped up in his own mistake that he nearly messes up the mission. Written with tongue firmly in cheek by Susan K. Williams, "The Spy That Rooked Me" originally aired in America on October 13, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Glamour Girls Desperately desiring eternal youth, Madame Veil relies upon the sinister resourcefulness of Cobra. The villains kidnap dozens of beautiful fashion models, intending to tap their youthfulness on behalf of Mme. Veil. The Joes go to the rescue, receiving unexpected help from one of the abducted models: Lowlight's own sister Una. Beth Bornstein's teleplay is more than a little beholden to the Georges Franju horror film Eyes Without a Face, especially near the end of the story. "Glamour Girls" made its American TV debut on October 8, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Cobrathon Cobra is in dire need of an expensive computer virus designed to cripple the records of law enforcement agencies throughout the world. But rather than pay for the device in the normal fashion, the villains choose to put on a pay-per-view telethon, staged in a hellish casino. In this perverse twist on the Jerry Lewis oeuvre, the telethon's "entertainment" includes the ritual torture of Joe members Sci-Fi and Lifeline. Written by Martin Pasko and Rebecca Parr, "Cobrathon" first aired in America on October 6, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Sink the Montana The unexpected catalyst for this episode is Admiral George Lattimer of the U.S. Navy. Unwilling to allow his beloved USS Montana to be scrapped, the admiral joins force with Cobra's Destro turns against the United States. The Joes must prevent Lattimer from using his obsolete but still-deadly battleship from destroying the entire Atlantic Fleet. Written by David Carren, "Sink the Montana" first aired in America on September 29, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Raise the Flagg! The Joes and the Cobras race against other to salvage the remains of the sunken aircraft carrier U.S.S. Flagg. The Joes get to the wreckage first, only to discover it is inhabited by a demented Cobra chef. In addition to deadly gastronomic efforts, the Joes must also contend with some BATs and an antimatter energy pod. Written by David Carren, "Raise the Flagg!" made its first American TV appearance on October 20, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: My Brother's Keeper Wheelchair-bound physicist Jeremy Penser allows himself to be duped by Cobra. In exchange for regaining the use of his legs, Dr. Penser agrees to help develop Cobra's latest weapon of destruction. So blindsided does Penser become that he nearly seals the doom of his own younger brother Timothy -- not to mention practically every member of the G.I. Joe team. Written by Buzz Dixon, "My Brother's Keeper" originally aired in America on October 15, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Iceberg Goes South Joe Team member Iceberg visits his girlfriend, Mahia, at her uncle's "Tropodome," a tropical biodome. Little does he suspect that Cobra's Dr. Mindbender is using the building as headquarters for his latest batch of diabolical genetic experiments. By the time the rest of the Joes show up, Iceberg has been converted into a hideous mutant. Written by Mary Skrenes, "Iceberg Goes South" first aired in America on October 9, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Rotten Egg Invited to be the guest of honor at a military academy, Leatherneck discovers that the institution is under the command of Cobra. Worse still, the head of the academy is a fugitive criminal named McCann -- who, as a raw Marine grunt, had been trained by Leatherneck at Parris Island. Seeking revenge for being booted from the service, Leatherneck is determined to use his own military strategy to destroy his former mentor. Written by Steve Mitchell and Barbara Petty, "The Rotten Egg" originally aired in America on October 7, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Million Dollar Medic LifeLine rescues Bree Van Mark, daughter of a wealthy industrialist, from a watery grave. To show her gratitude, Bree showers the reluctant LifeLine with expensive gifts -- including a gold-plated helicopter. Inevitably, the girl becomes a pawn in the latest Cobra scheme. Celebrated cartoon voice-over director Susan Blu is heard as Bree. Written by Carla and Gerry Conway, "Million Dollar Medic" first aired in America on October 2, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Once Upon a Joe... During a pitched battle between the Cobras and the Joes, an orphanage is accidentally destroyed, though the children emerge unscathed. As a new building is constructed, Shipwreck tries to keep the kids entertained, all the while endeavoring to prevent Zartan from recovering a lost Cobra weapon, the mysterious McGuffin Device (scriptwriter Buzz Dixon certainly knows his Hitchcock). The plot is partially resolved by orphan girl Jenny, who in many respects is quicker on the uptake than the Joes. "Once Upon a Joe..." originally aired in the U.S. on October 1, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Let's Play Soldier In Bangkok, Leatherneck takes charge of four "dust children," street orphans fathered by American GIs. Meanwhile, Cobra tries to enslave the population of Thailand by distributing chewing gum laced with Dr. Mindbender's latest mind-paralysis drug. As if that wasn't enough of a complication, the duplicitous Zarana leads the G.I. Joe team into another trap. Written by Sharman Di Vono, "Let's Play Soldier" first aired in the U.S. on September 30, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Computer Complications Cobra operative Zarana breaks into Joe headquarters, there to steal an antimatter deposit. Her plans are altered when she meets and falls in love with Joe team member Mainframes. Orders are orders, and Zarana has been ordered to kill Mainframe. David Schwartz's teleplay is chock-full of clever and unexpected plot twists. "Computer Complications" was first telecast in America on September 26, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Last Hour to Doomsday Cobra's latest weapon is the Vortex Cone, which plays havoc with the ocean's magnetic currents to cause huge tidal waves all over the world. Thus armed, the Cobra leader threatens to wipe out the entire East Coast if his demands are not meant. In their efforts to foil the villains, the Joe Teams deploys such strategies as having Lady Jaye impersonate the Baroness. Written by Tom Degenais, "Last Hour to Doomsday" originally aired in America on September 25, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: My Favorite Things Serpentor leads a band of Cobras in stealing the historical relics which, when assembled, form the DNA for Serpentor's personality matrix. The villains' problem: They must wrest these relics away from the even nastier despots who currently possess them. Meanwhile, Joe team member Wet-Suit learns a valuable lesson about self-control -- and nearly meets disaster in the castle of the original Count Dracula. Written by Doug Booth, "My Favorite Things" originally aired in America on October 16, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Into Your Tent I Will Silently Creep Joe team member Cross Country stumbles upon a Cobra slave labor camp. The captives are toiling on behalf of Cobra Commander, who needs enough money to thwart Serpentor's latest power play. The story's "maguffin" is a missing computer disk, over which a lot of fuss is stirred. Some good "mutant" character design and animation distinguishes this episode, which was written by Buzz Dixon and Michael Charles Hill. "Into Your Tent I Will Silently Creep" was the final episode of G.I. Joe, though not the final one to be telecast: Its original American air date was November 20, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Not a Ghost of a Chance Three Cobra members go on Hector Ramirez's TV show "Twenty Questions," ostensibly to clear themselves of charges that he destroyed the prototype for a new stealth bomber. Meanwhile, the Joes try to rescue the bombers' missing pilots. Their efforts -- and the ultimate unmasking of Cobra as the scoundrels that they really are -- is almost undermined by Joe team member Flint's personal demons. Written by Sharmon Di Vono, "Not a Ghost of a Chance" was first telecast in America on November 13, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide
  • Justice League: The Complete Series

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Nov 10, 2009

    Includes:Justice League: Secret Origins, Part 1 (2001) Justice League: In Blackest Night, Part 1 (2001) Justice League: Secret Origins, Part 2 (2001) Justice League: Secret Origins, Part 3 (2001) Justice League: In Blackest Night, Part 2 (2001) Justice League: The Enemy Below, Part 1 (2001) Justice League: The Enemy Below, Part 2 (2001) Justice League: Paradise Lost, Part 1 (2002) Justice League: Fury, Part 1 (2002) Justice League: A Knight of Shadows , Part 1 (2002) Justice League: The Brave and the Bold, Part 2 (2002) Justice League: Legends, Part 1 (2002) Justice League: The Savage Time, Part 1 (2002) Justice League: Fury, Part 2 (2002) Justice League: Metamorphosis, Part 1 (2002) Justice League: A Knight of Shadows, Part 2 (2002) Justice League: The Savage Time, Part 3 (2002) Justice League: The Savage Time, Part 2 (2002) Justice League: Metamorphosis, Part 2 (2002) Justice League: Legends, Part 2 (2002) Justice League: Paradise Lost, Part 2 (2002) Justice League: Injustice for All, Part 1 (2002) Justice League: Injustice for All, Part 2 (2002) Justice League: The Brave and the Bold, Part 1 (2002) Justice League: War World, Part 1 (2003) Justice League: War World, Part 2 (2003) Justice League: Eclipsed, Part 2 (2003) Justice League: Tabula Rasa, Part 2 (2003) Justice League: Wild Cards, Part 1 (2003) Justice League: Tabula Rasa, Part 1 (2003) Justice League: Hearts and Minds, Part 1 (2003) Justice League: Maid of Honor, Part 2 (2003) Justice League: Hereafter, Part 1 (2003) Justice League: Comfort and Joy (2003) Justice League: Wild Cards, Part 2 (2003) Justice League: Maid of Honor, Part 1 (2003) Justice League: Secret Society, Part 2 (2003) Justice League: Twilight, Part 1 (2003) Justice League: Secret Society, Part 1 (2003) Justice League: A Better World, Part 2 (2003) Justice League: The Terror Beyond, Part 2 (2003) Justice League: Only a Dream, Part 2 (2003) Justice League: Hearts and Minds, Part 2 (2003) Justice League: A Better World, Part 1 (2003) Justice League: Only a Dream, Part 1 (2003) Justice League: The Terror Beyond, Part 1 (2003) Justice League: Eclipsed, Part 1 (2003) Justice League: Twilight, Part 2 (2003) Justice League: Hereafter, Part 2 (2003) Justice League: Starcrossed, Part 2 (2004) Justice League Unlimited: Dark Heart (2004) Justice League Unlimited: This Little Piggy (2004) Justice League Unlimited: Fearful Symmetry (2004) Justice League Unlimited: The Greatest Story Never Told (2004) Justice League Unlimited: The Return (2004) Justice League Unlimited: For the Man Who Has Everything (2004) Justice League: Starcrossed, Part 1 (2004) Justice League: Starcrossed, Part 3 (2004) Justice League Unlimited: Kid Stuff (2004) Justice League Unlimited: Wake the Dead (2004) Justice League Unlimited: Ultimatum (2004) Justice League Unlimited: Initiation (2004) Justice League Unlimited: Hawk and Dove (2004) Justice League Unlimited: The Ties That Bind (2005) Justice League Unlimited: Question Authority (2005) Justice League Unlimited: Hunter's Moon (2005) Justice League Unlimited: Task Force X (2005) Justice League Unlimited: The Balance (2005) Justice League Unlimited: Flashpoint (2005) Justice League Unlimited: Panic in the Sky (2005) Justice League Unlimited: Divided We Fall (2005) Justice League Unlimited: Epilogue (2005) Justice League Unlimited: I Am Legion (2005) Justice League Unlimited: Double Date (2005) Justice League Unlimited: Clash (2005) Justice League Unlimited: Shadow of the Hawk (2005) Justice League Unlimited: Chaos at the Earth's Core (2005) Justice League Unlimited: To Another Shore (2005) Justice League Unlimited: The Once and Future Thing: Weird Western Tales (2005) Justice League Unlimited: The Doomsday Sanction (2005) Justice League Unlimited: The Cat and the Canary (2005) Justice League Unlimited: The Once and Future Thing: Time, Warped (2005) Justice League Unlimited: Grudge Match (2006) Justice League Unlimited: Far From Home (2006) Justice League Unlimited: Ancient History (2006) Justice League Unlimited: Alive! (2006) Justice League Unlimited: Destroyer (2006) Justice League Unlimited: Dead Reckoning (2006) Justice League Unlimited: Flash and Substance (2006) Justice League Unlimited: Patriot Act (2006) Justice League Unlimited: The Great Brain Robbery (2006) Justice League: Secret Origins, Part 1 The greatest heroes in comic book history join forces in this animated made-for-TV adventure. After the United States sends an expedition to Mars, one of the astronauts, J. Allen Carter (voice of Gary Cole), runs for president, and after taking office makes good on a promise to eliminate nuclear weapons, calling on Superman (voice of Kevin Conroy) to use his powers to protect America instead of the bomb. Superman agrees, but he soon he and his fellow superheroes find themselves battling a strange and mysterious force. Superman and Carter are approached by J'On J'Onzz (voice of Carl Lumbly), who was one of the few survivors of a war that destroyed Martian civilization after the Earthlings visited. J'Onzz informs Superman that a sinister cadre of fellow Martians has made their way to Earth with plans to take over the world, and that they must be stopped if the people are to survive in freedom. Superman prepares for the fight of his life by bringing together a team of the greatest defenders on Earth, including Batman (voice of Kevin Conroy), Wonder Woman (voice of Susan Eisenberg), Green Lantern (voice of Phil LaMarr), the Flash (voice of Michael Rosenbaum), and Hawk Girl (voice of Maria Canals). Justice League: Secret Origins was the pilot film for the animated television series, and was divided into three episodes for broadcast on the Cartoon Network. ~ Mark Deming, All Movie Guide Justice League: In Blackest Night, Part 1 In the first episode of a two-part story, the Justice League must put aside its difference to save one of its own from certain death. The member in question is the Green Lantern, who has been targeted for prosecution (or is it persecution) by a Martian court. Making things difficult is the fact that the Green Lantern's comrade J'onn J'onnz is a member of the selfsame "Manhunter" faction that has arrested the Green One. This story is adapted from the Justice League of America comic-book continuity "No Man Escapes the Manhunter," and does not feature either Batman or Wonder Woman. Both episodes of "In Blackest Night" were released on DVD in tandem with another Justice League two-parter, "The Enemy Below," in April of 2003 under the umbrella title "Justice on Trial." ~ All Movie Guide Justice League: Secret Origins, Part 2 In part two of Justice League's three-part debut episode, the earth continues to be imperiled by huge, bug-like extraterrestrials who are impervious to conventional weaponry. Superheroes Batman and Superman respond to this attack by assembling the Justice League, comprised of their fellow do-gooders Wonder Woman, the Flash, the Green Lantern, and Hawkgirl -- plus an alien refugee whose planet has already been destroyed by the shapeshifting bugs, the Martian Manhunter (aka J'onn J'onnz). Though the League puts up a formidable defense against the invaders, it isn't quite enough -- and by episode's end two of the superheroes have fallen in battle! All three episodes of "Secret Origins" were released as a single DVD "movie" in April of 2002. ~ All Movie Guide Justice League: Secret Origins, Part 3 In the conclusion of Justice League's three-part debut episode, two of the League members have become casualties in the battle against the Imperium, those huge, shape-shifting, bug-like creatures who have launched an invasion of the earth. Rushing to the rescue of their fallen comrades, the remaining Leaguers must also race against time before the all-but-invulnerable Imperium conquers the world. Further complicating matters are the evil machinations of Senator Carter (voiced by Gary Cole), a purported pacifist who is actually an alien in disguise! All three episodes of "Secret Origins" were released as a single DVD "movie" in April of 2002. ~ All Movie Guide Justice League: In Blackest Night, Part 2 In the conclusion of a two-part story, the Green Lantern has been whisked off to Mars to stand trial for his life at the behest of the Martian Manhunters--an organization of which his fellow Justice Leaguer J'onn J'onnz is also a member. Convinced that the Green Lantern will not receive proper justice, the rest of the Justice League rushes to the rescue, while the Green One's longtime superirs, the Guardians of the Universe, show up as character witnesses. But is the whole trial merely a sham, to cover up a sinister conspiracy of evil? This story is adapted from the Justice League of America comic-book continuity "No Man Escapes the Manhunter", and does not feature either Batman or Wonder Woman. Both episodes of "In Blackest Night" were released on DVD in tandem with another Justice League two-parter, "The Enemy Below," in April of 2003 under the umbrella title "Justice on Trial." ~ All Movie Guide Justice League: The Enemy Below, Part 1 In the first episode of a two-part story, Aquaman, ruler of Atlantis, threatens to wreak vengeance against the surface-dwellers who are despoiling his domain. At the suggestion of Justice League member Superman, Aquaman agrees to argue his case before the World Assembly. But sinister forces conspire to send Aquaman off the "deep end" again -- and this time, the whole world may suffer horribly. The Flash and Hawkgirl do not appear in this story arc. Both episodes of "The Enemy Below" were released on DVD in tandem with another Justice League two-parter, "In Blackest Night," in April of 2003 under the umbrella title "Justice on Trial." ~ All Movie Guide Justice League: The Enemy Below, Part 2 In the conclusion of a two-part story, Aquaman, ruler of Atlantis, has become convinced that the surface dwellers of earth are conspiring against him and threatens to wreak a horrible vengeance. As it turns out, however, Aquaman is being victimized by certain of his own underwater subjects -- and among them may be his own son. Needless to say, the members of the Justice League (minus the Flash and Hawkgirl, who do not appear in this story arc) take it upon themselves to correct this situation and save the world both above and below the waves. Both episodes of "The Enemy Below" were released on DVD in tandem with another Justice League two-parter, "In Blackest Night," in April of 2003 under the umbrella title Justice on Trial. ~ All Movie Guide Justice League: Paradise Lost, Part 1 In the first episode of a two-part story, Justice League member Wonder Woman returns to Paradise Island, home of her fellow Amazons, in hopes of mending fences with her estranged mother. Upon arrival, she is shocked to discover that the Amazons have all been "petrified" into statues -- the handiwork of evil sorcerer Felix Faust. If she wants to save her friends and loved ones, Wonder Woman must help Felix find three precious artifacts -- but where are they, and why does he want them? The Green Lantern and Hawkgirl do not appear in this story arc. Both episodes of "Paradise Lost" were released on DVD in tandem with another Justice League two-parter, "War World," in July of 2003. ~ All Movie Guide Justice League: Fury, Part 1 In the first episode of a two-part story, the League faces a new foe in the form of Aresia, a renegade Amazon from Wonder Woman's home island. Leading a pack of Injustice Gang members, Aresia commits a series of seemingly pointless crimes, humiliating Batman in the process. Wonder Woman dispatches Hawkgirl to Amazon Island to root out the motives behind Aresia's crime wave. Meanwhile, the villainess' gang neutralizes Superman, Green Lantern, and Flash -- making it crystal clear that, for whatever reason, Aresia is conducting a deadly vendetta against the entire male population of Earth. ~ All Movie Guide Justice League: A Knight of Shadows , Part 1 In the first episode of a two-part story, medieval sorceress Morgaine LeFey and her equally villainous son Mordred reappear in the present, just before Halloween. The two reprobates are searchinig for the Philosopher's Stone, which will enable them to restore England to its Arthurian glory, with themselves as supreme rulers. In their efforts to thwart Morgaine and Mordred, the Justice League teams with the demonic Etrigan -- actually Jason Blood, who is still paying a terrible price for his long-ago betrayal of Morgaine. ~ All Movie Guide Justice League: The Brave and the Bold, Part 2 In the conclusion of a two-part story, the Green Lantern and the Flash combine their superpowers to thwart Grodd, a criminal mastermind who happens to be a gorilla. Using a diabolical mind-control device, Grodd intends to bring about a nuclear war that will destroy all mankind (not to mention monkeykind!) Meanwhile, several other Justice Leaguers, including Hawkgirl, Wonder Woman, Batman, and Martian Manhunter, are trapped in another dimension -- and may never be able to escape! Both episodes of "The Brave and the Bold" were released on DVD in tandem with another Justice League two-parter, "Injustice for All," in October of 2004. ~ All Movie Guide Justice League: Legends, Part 1 In the first episode of a two-part story, several Justice League members are whisked off to an alternate reality, reappearing in Seaboard City, a town that seems permanently locked in the 1950s. Here the Leaguers meet their counterparts, the Justice Guild of America -- all of whom resemble the "Golden Age" versions of DC Comics' familiar superheroes. The League and the Guild team up to thwart the doppelgangers of the "real world's" villainous Injustice Gang, here known as the Injustice Guild. Throughout the action, J'onn J'onnz (The Martian Manhunter) continues receiving psychic messages indicating that what appears to be happening may not be happening at all! ~ All Movie Guide Justice League: The Savage Time, Part 1 In the first episode of a three-part story (originally telecast as a single "feature film"), six Justice League members return from a space mission to find that Batman and his orbiting Watchtower have vanished. Even worse, the earth has transformed into a place of pure evil controlled by dictator Vandal Savage. On this alternate world, a different Batman leads a group of underground freedom fighters in a losing battle against Savage's hordes. The only way by which the Leaguers can set things right is go back in time to World War 2 -- and in so doing, they find new allies in the forms of "vintage" comic-book characters Sgt. Rock, the Blackhawks, and Wonder Woman's erstwhile 1940s boyfriend Steve Trevor! ~ All Movie Guide Justice League: Fury, Part 2 In the conclusion of a two-part story, renegade Aresia continues to carry out her vendetta against men by infecting all males of Gotham City with a deadly plague. Of the Justice League members, only Wonder Woman and Hawkgirl are impervious to Aresia's assault -- but will they be able to resist her offer to join her mission to destroy every man on the planet? Only a startling revelation from Aresia's past stands between victory and defeat for the remaining Leaguers. ~ All Movie Guide Justice League: Metamorphosis, Part 1 In the first episode of a two-part story, Rex Mason, an old friend of "Green Lantern" John Stewart, becomes a pawn in the sinister machinations of ruthless businessman Simon Stagg. Hoping to create a "perfect" worker, one who can transform into any element on earth, Stagg transforms Mason into the freakish Metamorpho. His new-found ability to change his molecular structure has some rather nasty side effects, however, and before long Mason/Metamorpho has become a sworn enemy of the Justice League. ~ All Movie Guide Justice League: A Knight of Shadows, Part 2 In the conclusion of a two-part story, medieval villains Morgaine and Mordred summon an army of the "undead" to vanquish the Justice League and to help them get their hands on the Philosopher's Stone. The villains' ultimate goal is to restore England to its ancient splendor, with themselves as absolute ruler. With the assistance of the quasi-demonic Etrigan, the Leaguers are determined to stop Morgain and Mordred in their tracks -- but they may have to do without the assistance of J'onn J'onnz, who is poised to go over to the enemy side in exchange for a reunion with his long-lost Martian loved ones. ~ All Movie Guide Justice League: The Savage Time, Part 3 In the conclusion of a three-part story, the Justice Leaguers, teamed with an alternate-reality Vandal Savage, have gone back in time to World War 2 in hopes of preventing the present from being horribly altered by despotic dictator Vandal Savage. Assisting the League in its efforts are such vintage comic-book heroes as Blackhawk, Steve Trevor (Wonder Woman's erstwhile mortal beau), and Sgt. Rock of Easy Company. Unfortunately, the villainy has been doubled as the 1940s-era Savage trades information with his modern-day counterpart. Will the combined forces of good be able to vanquish Savage, or will the horrifiying "alternate" world of the 21st century become reality? ~ All Movie Guide Justice League: The Savage Time, Part 2 In the second episode of a three-part story (originally telecast as a single "feature film"), the Justice Leaguers have gone back in time to World War 2, the better to prevent the despotic Vandal Savage from becoming ruler of the world in "The Present." In pursuit of this goal, the Green Lantern hooks up with Sgt. Rock and Easy Company; Flash and Hawkgirl team with the Blackhawks; and Wonder Woman aligns herself with military officer Steve Trevor. Meanwhile, J'onn J'onnz discovers that the 1940s-era Vandal Savage has forged a psychic link with his modern-day counterpart -- but before J'onn can act upon this information, the Leaguers fall into a trap! ~ All Movie Guide Justice League: Metamorphosis, Part 2 In the conclusion of a two-part story, the Justice League squares off against Metamorpho, a freakish mutant with the ability to change his molecular structure at a moment's notice. The mission is particularly painful for League member John Stewart (aka The Green Lantern); it seems that Metamorpho is actually his old friend Rex Mason. As it turns out, however, the real villain of the piece is not Metamorpho but ruthless businessman Simon Stagg -- ironically, the father of Rex Mason's sweetheart Sapphire. ~ All Movie Guide Justice League: Legends, Part 2 In the conclusion of a two-part story, several Justice League members are still trapped in a 1950s-style alternate reality with their "Golden Age" counterparts, the Justice Guild. Several disturbing images suggest that the Guild is doomed to a horrible demise--and that their deaths would also seriously affect the League. As it turns out, the entire dilemma is but an illusion, stirred up by a heretofore unspected menace. The climax of the story is as existential as anything dreamed up by Jean-Paul Sartre! ~ All Movie Guide Justice League: Paradise Lost, Part 2 In the conclusion of a two-part story, Wonder Woman must bend to the will of evil sorcerer Felix Faust, who has transformed her mother and the rest of the Amazons of Paradise Island into statues. Felix wants to get his hands on three ancient artifacts and demands that Wonder Woman find them for him. By the time the Justice League (minus Green Lantern and Hawkgirl) has arrived on Paradise Island to lend Wonder Woman a hand, another mega-villain, Lord Hades, has become involved in the intrigue! Both episodes of "Paradise Lost" were released on DVD in tandem with another Justice League two-parter, "War World," in July of 2003. ~ All Movie Guide Justice League: Injustice for All, Part 1 In the first episode of a two part story, Superman's perennial nemesis Lex Luthor breaks out of prison. The fugitive is pursued by the Justice League, who soon realize that Luthor is dying. As a "last stand" against the Leaguers in general and Superman in particular, Luthor manages to organize his own team of super-villains called The Injustice Gang, among them the Joker, Star Sapphire, the Shade, Copperhead, Cheetah, and Ultra-Humanite! Clancy Brown and Mark Hamill, who were heard as Luthor and the Joker in several previous animated versions of Batman and Superman, repeat their roles here. Both episodes of "Injustice for All" were released on DVD in tandem with another Justice League two-parter, "The Brave and the Bold," in October of 2004. ~ All Movie Guide Justice League: Injustice for All, Part 2 In the conclusion of a two-part story, the Justice League squares off against the Injustice Gang, a team of super-villains organized by a dying Lex Luther. Unfortunately, the Injustice Gang gets the upper hand when they capture Batman. As time runs out for the caped crusader, the other Justice Leaguers speed to the rescue...while Luther desperately seeks out a cure for his terminal illness. Both episodes of "Injustice for All" were released on DVD in tandem with another Justice League two-parter, "The Brave and the Bold," in October of 2004. ~ All Movie Guide Justice League: The Brave and the Bold, Part 1 In the first episode of a two-part story, Justice Leaguers the Flash and the Green Lantern try to solve the mystery of a band of thieves who claim to have no memory of committing their crimes -- a mystery compounded by the appearance of a talking gorilla! The trail of clues leads to an ape-research institute, where the evil Dr. Sarah Corwin is working with "criminal gorilla" Grodd on sinister mind-control experiments. Also crucial to the story are some stolen radioactive isotopes, which are used in a doomsday device that threatens to destroy the world! Both episodes of "The Brave and the Bold" were released on DVD in tandem with another Justice League two-parter, "Injustice for All," in October of 2004. ~ All Movie Guide Justice League: War World, Part 1 In the first episode of a two-part story, Justice League members Superman and Martian Manhunter are rendered unconscious by hydrogen pockets while destroying an asteroid before it can hit the Earth. "Rescued" by an alien ship, the two do-gooders find themselves prisoners of the evil dictator Mongul, who intends to pit Superman and Manhunter against his best gladiators on the desolate "resort planet" War World. Both episodes of "War World" were released on DVD in tandem with another Justice League two-parter, "Paradise Lost," in July of 2003. ~ All Movie Guide Justice League: War World, Part 2 In the conclusion of a two-part story, Superman and Martian Manhunter remain prisoners of the despotic Mongul, who has pitted the Man of Steel against his best gladiators in mortal combat in the arena of War World. Though Superman manages to win his first bout (and without shedding blood), he is ordered to throw the next fight, in which he will square off against Mongul himself. The price for Superman's disobedience will be the utter destruction of an entire planet and all its people! Can Hawkgirl and Green Lantern come to the rescue before any more damage can be wrought by the villainous Mongul? Both episodes of "War World" were released on DVD in tandem with another Justice League two-parter, "Paradise Lost," in July of 2003. ~ All Movie Guide Justice League: Eclipsed, Part 2 In the conclusion of a two-part story, an evil alien spirit continues to wage war against mankind via the Black Heart, a powerful lunar gemstone. The stone has cast its sinister spell on virtually every member of the Justice League, transforming them from heroes to villains. Only The Flash has managed to escape the Black Heart's influence -- and it is up to him to set things right before the alien baddie can create a solar eclipse that will destroy both the sun and the Earth. ~ All Movie Guide Justice League: Tabula Rasa, Part 2 In the conclusion of a two-part story, Lex Luthor continues his campaign of revenge against the Justice League with the help of the android AMAZO, which is capable of mirroring the likenesses and special skills of the League members. Once AMAZO takes on the powers of Superman -- albeit with an evil twist -- there seems to be no stopping him. The only hope for our heroes' salvation is in the hands of J'onn J'onnz, "The Martian Manhunter," who unfortunately has soured on mankind and is no mood to come to anyone's rescue. ~ All Movie Guide Justice League: Wild Cards, Part 1 The Justice League finds itself in the middle of a diabolical "reality show" along the Las Vegas strip. It seems that the Joker has planted time bombs all up and down the main drag of Sin City, and has given the JLers only a few hours to deactivate the explosives. Complicating matters is the interference of The Joker's newest henchpersons, the "Royal Flush Gang": Ace, King, Queen, Jack and Ten (their voices ironically supplied by cast members of Justice League's "sister" animated series Teen Titans). ~ All Movie Guide Justice League: Tabula Rasa, Part 1 In the first episode of a two-part story, perennial Superman foe Lex Luthor manages to escape incarceration, though his life-saving armor has been damaged in the process. Hoping to wreak vengeance against the Justice League, Luthor activates one of his many sinister creations: AMAZO, an android capable of mirroring the likenesses and powers of the League members. Unfortunately, the "mirror" is a dark one, as proven by the unsavory "alternate" versions of the Green Lantern, Hawkgirl, and the rest. ~ All Movie Guide Justice League: Hearts and Minds, Part 1 In the first episode of a two-part story, John Stewart, aka The Green Lantern, must come to the rescue of his fellow "Lanterns," several of whom have pitted their lives against the alien minions of the evil Despero. John is alerted to this peril by another "Lantern" named Kilowog, who has escaped the villain's clutches and made his way to the headquarters of the Justice League. Complicating matters is the presence of Stewart's mentor and former sweetheart Kama Tui, who has apparently sold out to Despero. ~ All Movie Guide Justice League: Maid of Honor, Part 2 In the conclusion of a two-part story, would-be dictator Vandal Savage has commandeered the weaponry of the country of Kasnia, thereby enabling him to hold the world for ransom with a powerful orbiting ray gun. It is up to Bartman and Wonder Woman to stop Savage in his tracks -- and, incidentally, to rescue Princess Audrey from the ignominious fate of becoming Savage's bride. Meanwhile, J'onn J'onnz, The Flash, and The Green Lantern race against time to disarm the deadly ray. ~ All Movie Guide Justice League: Hereafter, Part 1 In the first episode of a two-part story, Superman apparently sacrifices himself for the sake of his fellow Justice Leaguers. Can it be that The Man of Steel is gone from the scene for good? And how will mankind be able to survive without Superman's benevolent protection? Originally intended to be telecast near the end of Justice League's second season, "Hereafter" was bumped forward to an earlier playdate due to its high suspense quotient. ~ All Movie Guide Justice League: Comfort and Joy This Christmas show is the only single-part episode of Justice League's second season. With Yuletide approaching, the various League members go their separate ways to celebrate the holiday. Superman invites Martian Manhunter J'onn J'onnz (here seen in one of his many earthly aliases) to Christmas dinner with the Man of Steel's earth parents, Ma and Pa Kent; The Green Lantern and Hawkgirl continue to draw closer together, especially during a hilarious snowball fight; and longtime foes Flash and Ultra-Humanite bury the hatchet long enough to help a group of needy orphans. ~ All Movie Guide Justice League: Wild Cards, Part 2 In the conclusion of a two-part story, the Justice League races against time to deactive the time bombs that the Joker has planted all up and down the Las Vegas strip. Ultimately the explosives are neutralized, and four of the five members of the Joker's Royal Flush Gang have been disposed of -- but there's still one ace up the villain's sleeve. As the story races to its climax, two of the League members, Hawkgirl and Green Lantern, suddenly begin to see one another in a whole new light. ~ All Movie Guide Justice League: Maid of Honor, Part 1 In the first episode of a two-part story, Batman (here seen for the first time on Justice League in his alter-ego digs as Bruce Wayne) and Wonder Woman head to the country of Kasnia, there to thwart would-be dictator Vandal Savage. Having apparently wormed his way into the confidence of the Kasnian royal family, Savage is poised to wed Princess Audrey, thereby enabling him to get his hands on a powerful orbiting ray gun. Can Batman and Wonder Woman save the day without donning costumes and resorting to their special powers? ~ All Movie Guide Justice League: Secret Society, Part 2 In the conclusion of a two-part story, simian villain Gorilla Grodd has organized the Secret Society, a tightly-knit team of fellow baddies. With the members of the Justice League falling prey to petty squabbles and ego tripping, it looks as if the Secret Sociey will be able to take over the world with the greatest of ease. It is up to The Green Lantern to set things aright -- but without the cooperation of his fellow Leaguers, he may well fail in his mission. ~ All Movie Guide Justice League: Twilight, Part 1 Season two of the animated Justice League begins with a two-part story set in space and features two of Superman's longtime nemeses, the enigmatic Darkseid and the wholly villainous Krypton refugee Brainiac. While Darkseid endeavors to break a longstanding extraterrestrial treaty between the New Gods and New Genesis, Brainiac foments chaos on the planet Apokolips. Superman's fellow Justice League members combine their talents to find a common solution for both problems, but their efforts are complicated by the questionable motives of Darkseid and the resourcefully sinister Brainiac. ~ All Movie Guide Justice League: Secret Society, Part 1 In the first episode of a two-part story, simian villain Gorilla Grodd hopes to take advantage of dissension and disagreement within the ranks of the Justice League. Grodd organizes his own team of villains, including such nasties as Giganta, Sinestro, and Killer Frost. Inasmuch as Grodd's team gets along with one another a lot better than the members of the Justice Leage, it looks as though villainy will triumph over virtue this time around! ~ All Movie Guide Justice League: A Better World, Part 2 In the conclusion of a two-part story, the Justice Lords, the evil counterparts of the Justice League from another dimension, have arrived on earth, intent upon either imposing their own sinister brand of law and order on the populace, or destroying the planet in the effort. Hoping to thwart the Justice Lords, the League mounts a brave but vulnerable defense. Just when it appears that the villains will triumph, the good-guy Leaguers receive help from a most unexpected -- and highly untrustworthy -- source. ~ All Movie Guide Justice League: The Terror Beyond, Part 2 In the conclusion of a two-part story, the Justice League has come to realize that Aquaman's motive for aligning himself with the villainous Solomon Grundy was borne of a desire to save rather than destroy mankind. Entering the dimension of "The Old Ones," the Leaguers, reluctantly accompanied by Dr. Grundy and another disreputable chap named Dr. Fate, hope to save the citizens of the surface from doom. Meanwnhile, Aquaman staves off an invasion of the Earth Realm -- but he may not be able to do it alone. ~ All Movie Guide Justice League: Only a Dream, Part 2 In the conclusion of a two-part story, the vengeful Dr. Destiny continues using his ESP machine to control the dreams -- and the minds -- of others, and to destroy the Justice League. At this point, virtually all the Leaguers are enslaved in their own personal nightmares, with seemingly no way out. Only Batman and J'onn J'onnz remain free to battle the insidious Destiny -- but in order to triumph of evil, our two heroes must stay awake...stay awake...STAY AWAKE!!! ~ All Movie Guide Justice League: Hearts and Minds, Part 2 In the conclusion of a two-part story, League member John Stewart, aka The Green Lantern, continues in his efforts to save his fellow "Lanterns" -- and by extension, all mankind -- from the mass-brainwashing scheme fomented by the evil Despero. Happily, it turns out that Stewart's former sweetheart Katma Tui has not joined the enemy camp but has gone undercover to destroy Despero's operation from within. Unhappily, Stewart, Katma, and Hawkgirl are captured by Despero's alien minions, leaving J'onn J'onnz and The Flash to mount a desperate rescue effort. ~ All Movie Guide Justice League: A Better World, Part 1 In the first episode of a two-part story, the members of the Justice League are confronted by their evil doppelgangers from another dimension. In their world, the "Justice Lords" rule with a curious and sinister version of law and order, in which the innocent suffer while the guilty flourish. When the Justice Lords arrive on earth, they are confused by values that they cannnot understand -- but which they are compelled to destroy. ~ All Movie Guide Justice League: Only a Dream, Part 1 In the first episode of a two-part story, the Justice League rushes to the scene of a prison break, orchestrated by convict John Dee, alias "Dr. Destiny." It turns out that the escape was a mere diversion, to allow Dr. Destiny enough time to steal a new ESP machine that is capable of invading and manipulating people's dreams. With this device, Destiny hopes to rule the world through mind control -- and, incidentally, destroy the League, whom he holds responsible for all the tragedy in his life. ~ All Movie Guide Justice League: The Terror Beyond, Part 1 In the first episode of a two-part story, the Justice Leaguers suspect that Aquaman, underwater ruler of Atlantis, has forsaken virtue in favor of evil. How else can they explain the fact that Aquaman has arranged the release of longtime League nemesis Solomon Grundy? Leading an investigation of this disturbing turn of events, League member Hawkgirl makes several startling discoveries -- but may not live long enough to act upon them! ~ All Movie Guide Justice League: Eclipsed, Part 1 In the first episode of a two-part story, peacekeepers in the Middle East unearth "The Black Heart," a lunar gemstone with awesome powers. It turns out that the stone is possessed by an evil alien spirit, bent on destroying everyone on earth. The Justice League is drawn into the story when Wonder Woman accidentally lays hands upon the Black Heart -- and immediately transforms from virtuous heroine to sinister villainess! ~ All Movie Guide Justice League: Twilight, Part 2 In the conclusion of Justice League's second-season opener, the Justice League has been imprisoned on a giant artificial moon, built in the shape of Superman's old Krypton foe Brainiac. It turns out that the Leaguers are mere pawns in a pact between the sinister Brainiac and the mercurial Darkseid, which involves exchanging Superman's DNA for the safety of the planet Apokolips. Before the final showdown between Superman and Darkseid, the other League Members have forged a self-protective alliance with the members of the New Genesis. ~ All Movie Guide Justice League: Hereafter, Part 2 In the conclusion of a two-part story, Superman remains in limbo, even as his comrades and all mankind mourn his apparent death. By the time he makes it back to earth, the planet is in a state of ruin -- and it is all the handiwork of would-be dictator Vandal Savage and the diabolical "White Dwaft" device. Adapted from the comic-book story "Under a Red Son," Hereafter was intended to be telecast near the end of Justice League's second season, but was bumped forward because of its high suspense quotient. ~ All Movie Guide Justice League: Starcrossed, Part 2 In the second episode of Justice League's three-part season-two finale, the Leaguers fall into a trap when attempting to help Hawkgirl's people, the Thangarians, in their war against the Gordanians. Managing to wriggle out of this predicament, the League members reconvene at Stately Wayne Manor, home of Batman's alter ego, Bruce Wayne. Meanwhile, the duplicitous villains who have set this story in motion begin carrying out their plan to destroy the earth. All three episodes of "Starcrossed" were released as a single DVD "movie" in July of 2004. ~ All Movie Guide Justice League Unlimited: Dark Heart The Justice League may have met its match in the form of hostile aliens who cannot be stopped in their efforts to overwhelm the earth. Upon disovering that the aliens are not living beings but actually compried of millions upon millions of tiny nanotech machines, Superman turns to the one man who may be able to come up with a means to destroy the invaders. That man is scientist Ray Palmer, who in his alter-ego form as The Atom shrinks himself to microscopic dimensions in order to face down the nanotechs on their own terms! ~ All Movie Guide Justice League Unlimited: This Little Piggy While on a stakeout of the Penguin's headquarters with Batman, Wonder Woman is suddenly and inexplicably turned into a pig by the enchantress Circe. The remainder of the episode finds Batman and the beauteous magician Zatanna combining forces to return "Wonder Pig" to her normal self. Mayhem blends with mythology and even music (don't miss Batman's soulful rendition of the old standard "Am I Blue?") in this wild and crazy tale. ~ All Movie Guide Justice League Unlimited: Fearful Symmetry Superman's cousin, Supergirl (aka Kara), has been having weird nightmares in which she appears to be cast in the role of an assassin. When J'onn J'onnz is unable to telepathically decipher these dreams, Green Arrow and The Question try to help Supergirl -- who soon tumbles to the possibility that she might not be dreaming at all. Fans of The Manchurian Candidate will enjoy the plot twists in this episode, which establishes a plot strand that will be explored in further chilling detail in the later episode "Ultimatum." ~ All Movie Guide Justice League Unlimited: The Greatest Story Never Told Booster Gold, a self-loathing deadbeat from the 25th century, travels backward to "our" time in hopes of finding a place for himself in the world -- any world. Linking up with the Justice League, Booster Gold is assigned to "crowd control" during an epic battle between the Leaguers and the sorcerer Mordru. In the course of events, Booster inadvertently finds himself in the thick action -- and the situation doesn't make him feel one teeny tiny bit better about himself. ~ All Movie Guide Justice League Unlimited: The Return In this followup to the second-season episode "Tabula Rasa," Superman's perennial nemesis Lex Luthor returns, claming to have completely reformed. Willing to give their former foe the benefit of the doubt, the Justice Leaguers try to protect Luthor from the evil android AMAZO, who seems determined to kill Lex in as nasty a manner as possible. Meanwhile, "Green Lantern" John Stewart tries to get over his busted romance with Hawkgirl. Fans of The Andy Griffith Show will enjoy the fleeting inside joke during the barbershop scene. ~ All Movie Guide Justice League Unlimited: For the Man Who Has Everything Based on a comic-book story by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons, "For the Man Who Has Everything" is that rarest of rare Justice League Unlimited episodes, giving center stage to the series' three biggest stars. It's Superman's birthday, so Batman and Wonder Woman head to the Fortress of Solitude to surprise their comrade. Upon arrival, the pair finds that Superman has already been surprised by a gift from the evil Mongul -- a parasitic plant that has immobilized the Man of Steel. As Batman and W.W. struggle to free their fellow Leaguer, the comatose Superman experiences what life would have been like had Krypton never exploded and had he remained on the planet as Kal-El -- with a very familiar-looking wife named Loana, and a "dream son," Van-El. ~ All Movie Guide Justice League: Starcrossed, Part 1 In the first episode of Justice League's three-part season-two finale, League member Hawkgirl is reunited with her own people, the Thangarians. Traveling from their home planet and landing on earth, the Thangarians try to enlist the League's aid against their traditional enemies, the Gordanians. Little does Hawkgirl suspect that this mission is not what it appears to be on surface! All three episodes of "Starcrossed" were released as a single DVD "movie" in July of 2004. ~ All Movie Guide Justice League: Starcrossed, Part 3 In the conclusion of Justice League's three-part season-two finale, the Leaguers face a showdown with the sinister winged Hawkmen, who intend to destroy the Earth. Complicating matters is the fact that League member Hawkgirl is from the same planet that is presently waging war against mankind. As the story races to its conclusion, the "good guys" (and good girls) must prevention the activation of a Hypergate that will set off an apocalyptic chain reaction. All three episodes of "Starcrossed" were released as a single DVD "movie" in July of 2004. ~ All Movie Guide Justice League Unlimited: Kid Stuff It's the Justice League vs. the sinister Arthurian trickster Mordred, who has succeeded in banishing all adults from the world. In order to thwart the bad guy, four of the Leaguers -- Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, and Green Lantern -- must transform themselves into eight-year-olds! Listen for Dakota Fanning as the voice of Kid Wonder Woman. "Kid Stuff" was released together with two other Justice League Unlimited episodes, "Initation" and "Hawk and Dove," in the 2005 DVD collection Justice League Unlimited: Saving the World. ~ All Movie Guide Justice League Unlimited: Wake the Dead A trio of nerdish students accidentally invoke a supernatural spell -- and presto! Familiar Justice League nemesis Solomon Grundy is revived from his "sleep of death." Going on a rampage, Grundy cannot be stopped by the Leaguers. Their only hopes lie in the only person who'd ever befriended the villainous Grundy -- former JL member Hawkgirl, now living in seclusion as her "civilian" persona Shayera. The question: Will Hawkgirl be willing to vanquish Grundy, to whom she owes her very life? Clips from several previous episodes are sprinkled throughout this pivotal Justice League Unlimited adventure. ~ All Movie Guide Justice League Unlimited: Ultimatum Following up the events in the previous episode "Fearful Symmetry," "Ultimatum" probes further into the secret government conspiracy against the Justice Leaguers. The Ultimen, a newly formed and very popular superhero group led by the mysterious Max Lord, offer a helping hand to the Justice Leaguers, who are busy battling fire monsters on an oil rig. Later, however, the Ultimen violently turn against the "good guys" when they learn the truth behind their own origin -- and also the horrible fate that is in store for them. ~ All Movie Guide Justice League Unlimited: Initiation Justice League opens its third season with a new title, Justice League Unlimited, and with a new League leader in charge: J'onn J'onnz, aka the Martin Manhunter. In the season opener, "Initiation, the League reforms in its renovated satellite headquarters, welcoming several more rotating members to their fold: Among the newcomers are the Green Arrow, Captain Adam, and Supergirl. The first assignment for the "recruits" takes them to China, where they do battle against a fearsome monster comprised of nuclear energy. "Initiation" was released together with two other Justice League Unlimited episodes, "Kid Stuff" and "Hawk and Dove," in the 2005 DVD collection Justice League Unlimited: Saving the World. ~ All Movie Guide Justice League Unlimited: Hawk and Dove Wonder Woman's latest assignment is to prevent a war in the country of Kaznia between two hostile factions -- a battle fomented by the sinister Ares. In this pursuit, Wonder Woman finds herself with two unlikely allies: A pair of brothers, one warlike, the other a committed pacifist (their voices provided by former Wonder Years co-stars Fred Savage and Jason Harvey). "Hawk and Dove" was released together with two other Justice League Unlimited episodes, "Initation" and "Kid Stuff," in the 2005 DVD collection Justice League Unlimited: Saving the World. ~ All Movie Guide Justice League Unlimited: The Ties That Bind Professional magician and escape artist Mr. Miracle calls upon the Flash to help him stage the greatest escape of all. Miracle hopes to travel to the far-off planet Apokalyps, there to rescue a very special captive. Highlighting this episode are the voice-over contributions of Arte Johnson, here invoking memories of his Laugh-In days in the role of Germanic toady Vermin Vunderbar, and Ed Asner, atypically cast as a hyper-villain named Granny Goodness! ~ All Movie Guide Justice League Unlimited: Question Authority No synopsis available. Justice League Unlimited: Hunter's Moon No synopsis available. Justice League Unlimited: Task Force X No synopsis available. Justice League Unlimited: The Balance No synopsis available. Justice League Unlimited: Flashpoint No synopsis available. Justice League Unlimited: Panic in the Sky No synopsis available. Justice League Unlimited: Divided We Fall No synopsis available. Justice League Unlimited: Epilogue No synopsis available. Justice League Unlimited: I Am Legion No synopsis available. Justice League Unlimited: Double Date No synopsis available. Justice League Unlimited: Clash No synopsis available. Justice League Unlimited: Shadow of the Hawk No synopsis available. Justice League Unlimited: Chaos at the Earth's Core No synopsis available. Justice League Unlimited: To Another Shore No synopsis available. Justice League Unlimited: The Once and Future Thing: Weird Western Tales In the first episode of Justice League Unlimited's two-part season three finale, David Clinton, a woebegone inventor from 50 years into the future, dons his own time-travel suit and journeys to "The Present." Stealing Batman's utility belt, Clinton leads Batman, Wonder Woman, and The Green Lantern on a not-so-merry chase that propels them back to the Old West. Here the three Justice Leaguers try to save a frontier town from the evil Tobia Manning, a 19th century outlaw armed with 21st century technology. ~ All Movie Guide Justice League Unlimited: The Doomsday Sanction This episode elaborates upon the secret government conspiracy against the Justice League, introduced in such third-season episodes as "Fearful Symmetry" and "Ultimatum." As Batman tries to halt the conspiracy that has been fomented by the sinister Amanda Waller, Superman heads into the bowels of a volcano for a titanic battle from which he may not emerge alive. It seems that Superman's opponent is the diabolical Doomsday -- who was supposed to have been permanently killed off several episodes ago. ~ All Movie Guide Justice League Unlimited: The Cat and the Canary In the first episode of Justice League Unlimited's fourth season, the Black Canary enlists the aid of The Green Arrow in her efforts to save her mentor, Wildcat, from a potentially grisly fate. For reasons known only to himself, Wildcat has agreed to participate in a "meta brawl" in a super-powered underground fight club known as The House. Making matters worse, a wall of near-impenetrable secrecy has been built around The House. ~ All Movie Guide Justice League Unlimited: The Once and Future Thing: Time, Warped In the conclusion of Justice League Unlimited's two-part season-three finale, JL members Batman, Green Lantern, and Wonder Woman continue their pursuit of time-traveling thief David Clinton. Chasing their quarry to his own time -- 50 years in the future -- the three Leaguers come face to face with their own furturistic counterparts, Batman II, Static, and War Hawk. The six superheroes pool their resources to do battle against the vicious "Jokerz" gang, only to find a greater menace in the form of David Clinton -- who, hoping to get even with those who have mocked his skills as an inventor, has transformed himself into Lord Chronos, all-powerful (and highly dangerous) Master of Space and Time. ~ All Movie Guide Justice League Unlimited: Grudge Match No synopsis available. Justice League Unlimited: Far From Home No synopsis available. Justice League Unlimited: Ancient History No synopsis available. Justice League Unlimited: Alive! No synopsis available. Justice League Unlimited: Destroyer No synopsis available. Justice League Unlimited: Dead Reckoning No synopsis available. Justice League Unlimited: Flash and Substance No synopsis available. Justice League Unlimited: Patriot Act No synopsis available. Justice League Unlimited: The Great Brain Robbery No synopsis available.
  • Sopranos: The Complete Series

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Nov 17, 2009

    Includes:The Sopranos: Pilot (1999) The Sopranos: 46 Long (1999) The Sopranos: Meadowlands (1999) The Sopranos: Pax Soprana (1999) The Sopranos: The Legend of Tennessee Moltisanti (1999) The Sopranos: A Hit Is a Hit (1999) The Sopranos: Isabella (1999) The Sopranos: I Dream of Jeannie Cusamano (1999) The Sopranos: Nobody Knows Anything (1999) The Sopranos: Boca (1999) The Sopranos: Down Neck (1999) The Sopranos: College (1999) The Sopranos: Denial, Anger, Acceptance (1999) The Sopranos: Guy Walks Into a Psychiatrist's Office (2000) The Sopranos: Full Leather Jacket (2000) The Sopranos: Do Not Resuscitate (2000) The Sopranos: Funhouse (2000) The Sopranos: The Knight in White Satin Armor (2000) The Sopranos: House Arrest (2000) The Sopranos: Bust-Out (2000) The Sopranos: From Where to Eternity (2000) The Sopranos: D-Girl (2000) The Sopranos: Toodle-Fucking-oo (2000) The Sopranos: Commendatori (2000) The Sopranos: Big Girls Don't Cry (2000) The Sopranos: The Happy Wanderer (2000) The Sopranos: Mr. Ruggerio's Neighborhood (2001) The Sopranos: Employee of the Month (2001) The Sopranos: University (2001) The Sopranos: He Is Risen (2001) The Sopranos: Pine Barrens (2001) The Sopranos: Army of One (2001) The Sopranos: Amour Fou (2001) The Sopranos: To Save Us All From Satan's Power (2001) The Sopranos: Second Opinion (2001) The Sopranos: Another Toothpick (2001) The Sopranos: Fortunate Son (2001) The Sopranos: Proshai, Livushka (2001) The Sopranos: Eloise (2002) The Sopranos: No-Show (2002) The Sopranos: Whitecaps (2002) The Sopranos: Whoever Did This (2002) The Sopranos: Calling All Cars (2002) The Sopranos: The Strong, Silent Type (2002) The Sopranos: Christopher (2002) The Sopranos: Everybody Hurts (2002) The Sopranos: The Weight (2002) The Sopranos: Watching Too Much Television (2002) The Sopranos: For All Debts Public and Private (2002) The Sopranos: Pie-O-My (2002) The Sopranos: Mergers & Acquisitions (2002) The Sopranos: Where's Johnny (2004) The Sopranos: All Happy Families (2004) The Sopranos: Irregular Around the Margins (2004) The Sopranos: Sentimental Education (2004) The Sopranos: Marco Polo (2004) The Sopranos: The Test Dream (2004) The Sopranos: Unidentified Black Males (2004) The Sopranos: Rat Pack (2004) The Sopranos: Two Tonys (2004) The Sopranos: All Due Respect (2004) The Sopranos: Long Term Parking (2004) The Sopranos: Cold Cuts (2004) The Sopranos: In Camelot (2004) The Sopranos: Join the Club (2006) The Sopranos: The Fleshy Part of the Thigh (2006) The Sopranos: Live Free or Die (2006) The Sopranos: Johnny Cakes (2006) The Sopranos: Cold Stones (2006) The Sopranos: Moe 'n' Joe (2006) The Sopranos: The Ride (2006) The Sopranos: Luxury Lounge (2006) The Sopranos: Mr. & Mrs. John Sacrimoni Request (2006) The Sopranos: Mayham (2006) The Sopranos: Members Only (2006) The Sopranos: Kaisha (2006) The Sopranos: Kennedy and Heidi (2007) The Sopranos: Stage 5 (2007) The Sopranos: Chasing It (2007) The Sopranos: Walk Like a Man (2007) The Sopranos: Remember When (2007) The Sopranos: Soprano Home Movies (2007) The Sopranos: Made in America (2007) The Sopranos: The Second Coming (2007) The Sopranos: The Blue Comet (2007) The Sopranos: Pilot In the pilot episode of this HBO television series from executive producer David Chase, a New Jersey mob boss named Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) suffers a series of anxiety attacks. Convinced by his physician that he needs to seek therapy, Tony consults psychiatrist Dr. Jennifer Melfi (Lorraine Bracco), who begins exploring her patient's attachment to a family of ducks that have been living in his pool, but have recently departed. As signs of weakness and disclosures made to a "shrink" could have violent repercussions in Tony's secretive world of organized crime, he keeps his visits with Melfi a secret. Those in the dark at first include his wife Carmela (Edie Falco), his manipulative mother Livia (Nancy Marchand), and his scheming uncle Junior (Dominic Chianese), a member of the same crime family. In the meantime, Carmela's relationship with her and Tony's high-school age daughter Meadow (Jamie-Lynn Sigler) is becoming strained, and their son Anthony Jr. (Robert Iler) is clueless about his dad's real profession. Tony's stress increases when he learns that the restaurant of his best friend, Artie Bucco (John Ventimiglia), is to be the site of a mob murder on the orders of Junior, and that his cousin Christopher Moltisanti (Michael Imperioli), one of Tony's soldiers, is making waves with his heavy-handed tactics. Tony orders Artie's restaurant blown up to trump Junior's plans, assuming that insurance will build his friend a new establishment. A hit with audiences and television critics alike, The Sopranos was the creation of executive producer Chase, whose resumé includes stints on such lauded television programs as The Rockford Files (1974-1980), I'll Fly Away (1991-1993), and Northern Exposure (1990-1995). The Sopranos' pilot episode aired on January 10, 1999. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: 46 Long In the sophomore episode of the HBO series, mob boss Jackie Aprile (Michael Rispoli) is dying of cancer, which can only lead to a power struggle between his two top capos, Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) and Tony's own uncle, Junior (Dominic Chianese). Tony persuades his mother, Livia (Nancy Marchand) to move into a retirement community against her wishes. When a car is stolen from a teacher at the school of Tony's son, Anthony Jr. (Robert Iler), Tony sends his two top lieutenants, "Big Pussy" Bompensiero (Vincent Pastore) and Paulie Walnuts (Tony Sirico) to get the vehicle back. The incident leads to Anthony Jr.'s first suspicions about his dad's true occupation. Junior is having his own problems with the headstrong Christopher Moltisanti (Michael Imperioli), his nephew, and a lieutenant of Tony's who has hijacked some merchandise from one of his trucks. Peace is made when Christopher agrees to pay Junior tribute, but his dimwitted associate Brendan Filone (Anthony de Sando) again holds up one of Junior's trucks, this time accidentally killing the driver. Tony learns that his friend Artie Bucco (John Ventimiglia) did not have his restaurant insured, and that an explosion Tony secretly arranged has destroyed his friend financially. "46 Long" originally aired January 17, 1999. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Meadowlands Revelations mark this fourth episode of the series, involving a schoolyard fight brewing between Anthony Soprano Jr. (Robert Iler) and a bully who unexpectedly backs down. Anthony Jr. fails to understand the boy's fear, so his sister Meadow (Jamie-Lynn Sigler) explains that their father, Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini), is not really a "waste management consultant" but a New Jersey mob kingpin. After he begins having erotic dreams about his psychiatrist, Dr. Jennifer Melfi (Lorraine Bracco), Tony hires a crooked cop, Vin Makazian (John Heard) to investigate Melfi's background, and the detective accidentally ruins her romance with a lawyer. Frantic after the mock execution he suffered, Soprano soldier Christopher Moltisanti (Michael Imperioli) believes that his cousin and boss, Tony, ordered the incident because he gave Tony's daughter, Meadow, some crystal methamphetamines; however, after Christopher and his girlfriend, Adriana (Drea de Matteo), discover the corpse of his murdered friend, Brendan Filone (Anthony de Sando), he realizes that his uncle, Junior (Dominic Chianese), ordered the slaying in retaliation for a botched truck hijacking. Exacerbated by Junior's bloodthirsty soldier, Mikey (Al Sapienza), tensions rise between Tony and Junior when their boss and head of the family, Jackie Aprile (Michael Rispoli), passes away from cancer. Tony is left to decide whether he will make a play for the top job in the family or concede control to his uncle. "Meadowlands" first aired on January 31, 1999. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Pax Soprana The sixth episode of the HBO mob series finds New Jersey crime boss Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) deciding to do the noble thing and cede control of the family to his rival and uncle, Junior (Dominic Chianese), much to everyone's surprise and dismay. In reality, Tony is maintaining control of the family. With the agreement of the other families in the tri-state area, Junior is being set up as a frontman without his knowledge. Immediately, however, Junior causes trouble by ordering tribute to be paid by Tony's top lieutenants, including a long-time family advisor, Hesh Rabkin (Jerry Adler). Tony shocks his psychiatrist, Dr. Jennifer Melfi (Lorraine Bracco), by declaring that he's falling in love with her during a session, and then kisses her. Junior learns that his tailor's grandson committed suicide because of a crippling drug addiction and orders two of his men to throw the drug dealer off a bridge in retaliation. Tony's medication is causing his sex drive to become nonexistent, much to the chagrin of both his wife Carmela (Edie Falco) and his mistress. At a dinner celebration, the FBI conducts surveillance on the Sopranos, aware that Tony is still the real power behind the criminal organization. "Pax Soprana" first aired on Valentine's Day, February 14, 1999. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: The Legend of Tennessee Moltisanti Legal troubles come to a boil in the eighth episode of the hit HBO series. Mob soldier Christopher Moltisanti (Michael Imperioli) is enraged that he's not receiving the same publicity that other Mafia soldiers are enjoying due to the current round of federal indictments that are being handed down and covered extensively in the press. On edge and ready to explode, Christopher gets into an altercation with a bakery employee and shoots the man's toe off. In the meantime, psychiatrist Jennifer Melfi (Lorraine Bracco) confesses to her son and ex-husband that she is counseling a stressed-out mobster, New Jersey crime kingpin Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini), and they become concerned about her safety. At a wedding, the Soprano family members learn that they are about to be indicted by the FBI, which has become interested in their activities again since the death of the organization's one-time godfather. Tony and his wife, Carmela (Edie Falco), hurry home to conceal evidence not a moment too soon, as federal agents soon arrive with warrants and begin searching the premises. When the story hits the news, Christopher is pleased and relieved to be mentioned as an important family associate. Episode 8 aired on February 28, 1999. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: A Hit Is a Hit A mob boss finds he can't escape his true identity, while his cousin learns that the music industry is as crooked as organized crime in the tenth episode of the HBO series. New Jersey Mafia chieftain Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) is delighted to receive an invitation to play golf with his well-to-do neighbor, Cusamano, at his exclusive country club. Happy to socialize with non-mobsters for once, Tony quickly realizes that Cusamano has extended the invitation simply to impress his buddies with his powerful crime boss pal. Tony's cousin and soldier Christopher Moltisanti (Michael Imperioli) and his girlfriend Adriana (Drea de Matteo) meet Massive Genius, a rap star with a financial grudge against Soprano family advisor Hesh (Jerry Adler). Genius is immediately attracted to Adriana and makes a deal with Christopher: in exchange for Christopher setting up a meeting between Genius and Hesh, the musician agrees to consider signing a band that Adriana wants to represent, but it becomes clear that Genius is only interested in Adriana sexually. Meanwhile, Tony gets even with Cusamano by asking him to "hold on" to a package wrapped in plain brown paper, sending his neighbor into a panic over the possibly illegal narcotic contents. Episode 10 first aired March 14, 1999. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Isabella A fantasy woman leads to a therapeutic breakthrough for a mob chieftain, as his family crumbles around him in the penultimate episode of the HBO series' freshman season. Briefly confined to his bed by depression, New Jersey Mafia boss Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) begins having hallucinogenic dreams about a beautiful neighbor named Isabella, who he believes to be a foreign exchange student living at his neighbor Cusamano's house. After Tony's cousin and soldier Christopher Moltisanti (Michael Imperioli) unwittingly prevents a first hit attempt on Tony, a pair of assassins nearly manage to kill the crime boss, but Tony gets away with only minor wounds. While he's recovering at the hospital, Tony is visited by the FBI, who tries in vain to recruit him as a federal witness. Tony also receives visits from his lieutenants, who vow revenge, and his uncle Junior (Dominic Chianese), whom he correctly suspects ordered the botched slaying. Tony discovers that there is no Isabella and that the gorgeous girl he envisioned suckling a baby was a figment of his imagination. While consulting with his psychiatrist, Dr. Jennifer Melfi (Lorraine Bracco), to see if she's the one who leaked information about him, Tony comes to the conclusion that his dreams about Isabella are significantly related to his lack of childhood nurturing and mothering. Isabella aired March 29, 1999. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: I Dream of Jeannie Cusamano The final episode of the HBO crime series' first season contains several startling plot twists. After she suffers a disorienting episode, Livia Soprano (Nancy Marchand), the manipulative mother of a powerful New Jersey crime boss, is moved to the nursing wing of her retirement home. Her son Tony (James Gandolfini) doesn't want to face the possibility, raised by his therapist Dr. Jennifer Melfi (Lorraine Bracco), that his own mother may have been in on an assassination attempt that nearly took his life. Later, however, the FBI plays tapes of Livia's conversations with Tony's uncle and family rival, Junior (Dominic Chianese), which proves she knew about the attempt and that Junior ordered it. Visiting with Livia, Tony's friend Artie Bucco (John Ventimiglia) discovers Tony's role in the destruction of his restaurant and confronts Tony with a shotgun, but Tony is able to convince his friend that Livia is losing her mind. Tony's cousin and muscle man Christopher Moltisanti (Michael Imperioli) and Soprano family lieutenant Paulie Walnuts (Tony Sirico) murder Junior's top soldier, Mikey (Al Sapienza), while he's out jogging. Before Tony can also rub out his uncle, Junior and his men are arrested by the Feds on racketeering charges. Tony informs Dr. Melfi that a gang war could be brewing, putting her life in danger, and that she should leave town for a while. Livia has a stroke, and an incensed Tony confronts her about her role in the attempt on his life as she is wheeled away. "I Dream of Jeannie Cusamano" first aired on April 4, 1999. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Nobody Knows Anything Looming betrayals within a mob family cloud the horizon in this episode of the popular HBO crime series. Crooked police officer Vin Mazakian (John Heard) tells New Jersey crime boss Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) that his best friend and trusted lieutenant Big Pussy Bompenseiro (Vincent Pastore), who was arrested by the feds, may have turned and could be working as an informant. Although he's incredulous, Tony orders another of his men, Paulie Walnuts (Tony Sirico) to find the truth. Tony cautions Paulie not to kill their old friend until he's absolutely certain that he's a snitch, as it's possible Mazakian is framing Pussy to get out of his gambling debts. Before Tony can learn more, Mazakian is arrested in a sting operation and, his career in tatters, commits suicide as Paulie's plan to get Pussy to disrobe at a steam bath to see if he's wearing a wire fails. At the same time, Tony's uncle and rival within the family, Junior (Dominic Chianese) orders a hit on Tony, giving the bloody assignment to his top soldier Mikey (Al Sapienza), who tells his wife he's moving up in the family. After the incident at the steam bath, Pussy disappears. This episode first aired March 21, 1999. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Boca An intimate sexual act triggers further tension between two crime bosses in this episode of the HBO series. New Jersey mob boss Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) ridicules his uncle and fellow mobster Junior (Dominic Chianese) on the golf course. Tony has heard about Junior's oral sex skills with his girlfriend, Bobbi, who has been gabbing to her friends about Junior's prowess while the two were on a vacation in Boca Raton, FL. In retaliation, Junior smashes a lemon meringue pie in Bobbi's face, breaking their 16-year relationship. He also tells his vicious top soldier, Mikey (Al Sapienza), a secret he's been keeping that he recently learned from his sister-in-law, Livia (Nancy Marchand): her son, Tony, is compromising family security by seeing a psychiatrist. Meanwhile, Tony and his friends make plans to convince their daughters' talented soccer coach not to accept a lucrative college job, until they learn that the coach has been sleeping with one of his underage players, a friend of Tony's daughter, Meadow (Jamie-Lynn Sigler). They take steps to teach the coach a lesson he'll never forget. "Boca" was first shown on March 7, 1999. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Down Neck In this domestic episode of the hit HBO series, Anthony Soprano Jr. (Robert Iler), the son of a powerful New Jersey crime boss, gets suspended from school for stealing sacramental wine from the chapel. The school psychologist summons the boy's parents, mob capo Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) and his wife, Carmela (Edie Falco), for a meeting at which Anthony Jr. is diagnosed with Attention Deficit Disorder. Tony is troubled by his son's actions and reflects on his own childhood with his cruelly controlling mother, Livia (Nancy Marchand), and his mobster father. Although Tony expresses concern to his psychiatrist, Dr. Jennifer Melfi (Lorraine Bracco), that his son may end up living the same life of crime he does, he and Carmela refuse to accept the judgment of their son's school that the boy might need special education. Forced to visit Livia in her retirement home everyday, Anthony Jr. tells his grandmother about the incident and, also, accidentally reveals that his father is consulting a psychiatrist, spilling a very dangerous family secret to the shrewd and manipulative Livia. Down Neck aired on February 21, 1999. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: College Painful truths are revealed in the popular HBO series' standout fifth episode. New Jersey crime boss Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) escorts his daughter, Meadow (Jamie-Lynn Sigler), on visits to several colleges in New England. As Tony and Meadow travel, he discusses his occupation with her openly for the first time. Although he's reluctant to do so, it has become obvious that Meadow and her younger brother, Anthony Jr. (Robert Iler), are aware of their father's criminal career. Stopping in a small Maine town, Tony spots a one-time snitch against the family named Fabian Petrulio, who long ago disappeared into the federal witness protection program. Between Meadow's appointments at various schools, Tony resolves to murder Fabian. Although Tony has confessed, to the delight of his wife Carmela (Edie Falco), that he is in therapy, she is unaware that his doctor is an attractive Italian-American woman, Dr. Jennifer Melfi (Lorraine Bracco), to whom Tony has become drawn sexually. Home with the flu, Carmela becomes furious when she receives a call from Melfi about a scheduling conflict. Confiding her marital frustrations to her movie-loving friend Father Phil, Carmela's relationship with the priest threatens to become romantic when Phil decides to spend the night on the couch. Back in Maine, Tony learns that Petrulio now goes by the name "Fred Peters." Convinced he's got the right man, Tony plots his revenge on Petrulio. "College" first aired on February 7, 1999. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Denial, Anger, Acceptance In the series' third episode, a crime family confronts the possibility of a future power struggle. Meadow Soprano (Jamie-Lynn Sigler), the daughter of New Jersey mob boss Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini), takes crystal methamphetamines with a friend in order to help them study for the SATs. Tony visits his dying Mafia superior, Jackie Aprile (Michael Rispoli), in the hospital and presents him with a gift: a hooker dressed as a nurse. Mikey Palmice (Al Sapienza), the top lieutenant of Tony's rival and uncle, Junior (Dominic Chianese), is convinced that Tony will make a grab for top boss after Jackie's death, and he begins to convince Junior that his nephew should be whacked. Tony, his henchman Paulie Walnuts (Tony Sirico), and another Soprano lieutenant, Silvio Dante (Steven Van Zandt), deal with a Hasidic family of motel owners who refuse to pay protection money. After hiring family friends Artie Bucco (John Ventimiglia) and his wife Charmaine (Kathrine Narducci) to cater a party, Tony's wife, Carmela (Edie Falco), learns that her husband slept with Charmaine in high school. Soprano associate Christopher Moltisanti (Michael Imperioli) tries to make a botched truck hijacking right by returning stolen goods to Junior, but the mob capo still orders Christopher's pal, Brendan Filone (Anthony de Sando), murdered and Christopher to be threatened. Airing on January 24, 1999, "Denial, Anger, Acceptance" was directed by independent feature filmmaker Nick Gomez (New Jersey Drive, Illtown). ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Guy Walks Into a Psychiatrist's Office In the second-season premiere of this original HBO series, Mob boss Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) adjusts to some changes in both his families in the wake of his mother's betrayal and a legal crackdown by federal law enforcement. Tony's also dealing with the sudden reappearance of his sister Janice (Aida Turturro), a free spirit going by the Hindu name "Parvati," who's really a greedy schemer in the finest Soprano tradition. Claiming she's there to care for their hospitalized mother Livia (Nancy Marchand), Janice is angling to get her mother's house (or the proceeds from its sales) when Livia dies. Tony refuses to see Livia, who's "dead" as far as he's concerned and not invited to a family barbecue. Tony's Uncle Junior (Dominic Chianese) is in jail and Tony orders a hit on Philly, one of Junior's men, because Philly's blabbing about Tony's therapy. But Tony's psychotherapist Dr. Jennifer Melfi (Lorraine Bracco), who's been reduced to hiding out and seeing patients in a motel room, refuses to treat her star patient despite his renewed panic attacks, telling him off at a diner. Nephew Christopher Moltisanti (Michael Imperioli) expands into a new business venture involving a scam stock brokerage called Webistics. Meanwhile Big Pussy (Vincent Pastore) reappears, claiming to have undergone rehab in Puerto Rico. "Guy Walks Into a Psychiatrist's Office" premiered January 16, 2000. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Full Leather Jacket A violent turn of events threatens the good fortunes of the Soprano family in this episode of the cable television series. Concerned that her daughter, Meadow (Jamie-Lynn Sigler), could end up attending a college thousands of miles away, Carmela Soprano (Edie Falco) asks her neighbor, Jean Cusamano (Saundra Santiago), for a favor. It seems that Jean's twin sister, Joan (also played by Santiago), a successful lawyer, is a graduate of Georgetown University and serves in an influential alum position. Carmela asks if Joan would write a recommendation for Meadow, but Joan's answer is no. Determined and more than a little peeved, Carmela bakes a ricotta pie and shows up at Joan's office, making it clear that the recommendation is an offer Joan can't refuse. Carmela's husband, mob boss Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini), is dealing with his own headache, his lieutenant Richie Aprile (David Proval), who is bucking his order to build a wheelchair access ramp at the home of pizzeria owner Beansie (Paul Herman), whom Richie is responsible for injuring. Richie caves in after a talk with Tony's Uncle Junior (Dominic Chianese) and even offers Tony his lucky leather jacket, a relic from the 1970s that Tony promptly gives to his maid's immigrant husband, enraging Richie. Deciding to quit taking drugs and give up his dreams of a life in the movie business, Soprano family lieutenant Christopher Moltisanti (Michael Imperioli) asks his girlfriend, Adriana (Drea de Matteo), to marry him. The couple's joy is short-lived, as Christopher's two partners in crime, Matt Bevilaqua (Lillo Brancato Jr.) and Sean Gismonte (Chris Tardio), decide to move up the mob ladder by murdering Christopher, gunning him down in a diner parking lot. Sean is killed in the attack, and Matt goes on the run after Richie refuses to help him. "Full Leather Jacket" originally aired March 5, 2000. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Do Not Resuscitate New Jersey mob boss Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) proves himself a cagey leader in this episode of the cable TV series. When Tony's Uncle Junior (Dominic Chianese) is released from jail under house arrest due to a heart condition, Tony meets with him at the office of Junior's doctor, which cannot be wire-tapped by the government due to doctor-patient confidentiality laws. Tony allows Junior to earn a token five percent of his income and retain the title of "boss." Tony's still the one in charge, however, as he proves when he negotiates an end to a labor strike in a surprising way profitable both for him and a black community activist. Although Junior is nursing a serious grudge against his nephew, it's Tony he turns to when he injures himself in a bathtub fall. Janice (Aida Turturro) continues to worm her way back into the Soprano family by befriending her niece, Meadow (Jamie-Lynn Sigler), who gets her driver's license, and buttering up her mother, Livia (Nancy Marchand). Livia and Janice's new closeness is short-lived, however, because Tony's son, Anthony Jr. (Robert Iler), innocently spills the beans about his father and Janice discussing a "DNR" order. During a trip to the doctor's office for a steroid injection to alleviate back pain, Soprano family soldier Big Pussy (Vincent Pastore) is revealed to be working with FBI agent Skip Lipari (Louis Lombardi), but not everything Big P tells the federal agent is true, so who's playing who? "Do Not Resuscitate" first aired January 23, 2000. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Funhouse A pair of graduations and a goodbye to an old friend wrap up the second season of the popular HBO series. New Jersey Mafia boss Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) is flush with a run of financial success thanks to several recent schemes, including big payoffs from a calling-card scam. He buys his wife, Carmela (Edie Falco), a new sable coat, and gives plane tickets to Arizona to his mother, Livia (Nancy Marchand), and her sister. Later, a bad dish at an Indian restaurant gives Tony serious food poisoning, leading to a series of disturbing dreams. In one of them, his friend, Pussy (Vincent Pastore), appears in the form of a frozen fish to announce that he's a FBI informant and that Tony has known all along. Tony begins to recover, determined to learn the truth about Pussy, whom he's long suspected of colluding with the feds. Visiting Pussy's home, Tony feigns continued illness and discovers hidden sound recording equipment and audiotapes. Tony, along with his top captains Silvio Dante (Steve Van Zandt) and Paulie Walnuts (Tony Sirico) pretends to take Pussy on a test drive of a new powerboat, and force a confession from their old friend once they're out to sea. Pussy admits his guilt, but adds that most of the information he fed the government was false. Tony, Paulie, and Silvio murder Pussy and dump his body into the ocean. Returning home to continue preparations for the high school graduation party of his daughter ,Meadow (Jamie-Lynn Sigler), Tony receives a call from his mother. It seems the Arizona plane tickets were stolen during an earlier bankruptcy bust-out, and Livia has been detained. It's not long before law enforcement officers show up at the Soprano resident to arrest Tony. He's quickly bailed out by his lawyer, and Tony attends a therapy session with Dr. Melfi (Lorraine Bracco), who finally admits to Tony that she's frightened of him. At his daughter's graduation celebration, Tony tells his lieutenant, Christopher Moltisanti (Michael Imperioli), that he's about to graduate as well, to being a "made man" in the Mob. "Funhouse" first aired April 9, 2000. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: The Knight in White Satin Armor A mob boss's biggest personnel problem is resolved in an unexpected fashion in this penultimate episode of the cable television series' second season. Mob chieftain Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) has been trying to break off his long-running affair with Irina (Oksana Babiy), but the possessive Russian mistress tries to commit suicide with an overdose of pills. Tony is finally forced to send his captain, Silvio Dante (Steve Van Zandt) to visit Irina with a dose of wise advice and an envelope containing 75 thousand dollars. Tony's problems with his enforcer, Richie Aprile (David Proval), are coming to a head because Richie is refusing to follow Tony's order to stop selling drugs on his trash-hauling routes. Now Richie's trying to muscle into other capos' territories and scheming to kill Tony. Trying to persuade Tony's uncle, Junior (Dominic Chianese), to join him, the erratic and hot-tempered Richie finds Junior reluctant. Tony and his wife, Carmela (Edie Falco), host an engagement party for Richie and Tony's sister, Janice (Aida Turturro). Electing to remain loyal to Tony, Junior tips his nephew off about Richie's homicidal plans and receives an increase in his percentage from a grateful Tony. Tony orders Silvio to whack Richie, but before Silvio can carry out the hit, Richie and Janice get into a violent domestic quarrel, and Janice shoots Richie twice at point-blank range. Soprano lieutenants Christopher Moltisanti (Michael Imperioli) and Furio Giunta (Federico Castelluccio) get rid of Richie's corpse at the butcher shop, while Tony puts Janice on a bus back to Seattle, concluding, "All in all, it's been a good visit." Soprano family solider Big Pussy (Vincent Pastore) seems to be having a mental meltdown due to the stress of being a government informant. Acting as if he thinks he's a junior G-man, Pussy stakes out and tails Christopher on an illegal mission to highjack a truckload of "Pokemon" cards but runs down an innocent bicyclist instead. "The Knight in White Satin Armor" first aired April 2, 2000. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: House Arrest A mob boss tries to reform for appearances' sake in this episode of the TV cable series that begins heating up several story lines in anticipation of the second season finale. Having narrowly avoided prosecution in a murder case, New Jersey Mafia don Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) is advised by his lawyer to begin keeping regular office hours at his legitimate business, a waste management company called Barone Brothers Sanitation. A 9-5 desk job drives Tony to distraction, however, and even sexual escapades with a secretary don't seem to alleviate his increased stress, which causes a rash on his arm and another blackout at an annual golf outing for waste haulers. Wary of increased attention from the FBI, Tony orders his brother-in-law to tell Richie Aprile (David Proval) to stop selling cocaine on his garbage routes, causing even more bad blood between them. Uncle Junior (Dominic Chianese), who's partnered with Richie in the narcotics scheme and chafing under house arrest, begins to enjoy the company of Catherine Romano (Mary Louise Wilson), a police captain's widow he knew in his youth. Still drinking vodka before her sessions with Tony, Dr. Melfi (Lorraine Bracco) feels duty-bound to treat the mobster, even though her patient wants to quit therapy. After an altercation with a smoker at a restaurant embarrasses her son, Melfi receives a prescription for Luvox, an obsessive-compulsive disorder medication, from her psychiatrist, Dr. Kupferberg (Peter Bogdanovich). "House Arrest" first aired March 26, 2000. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Bust-Out A witness could bring an organized crime family crashing down in this episode of the HBO television series created by David Chase. Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) is distressed to learn that a witness has identified him as being in the area where a traitorous mob lieutenant was murdered. He visits his lawyer, Neil Mink (David Margulies), to discuss a strategy of stalling the feds, and delivers a bag of cash, Tony's rainy day fund for his wife and kids should he be arrested. Tony's also upset when his son, Anthony Jr. (Robert Iler), prefers to hang out with his friends at the mall rather than spend time with his dad, but Tony then promptly forgets his son's swim meet. After a meeting with Tony, Soprano family muscle Richie Aprile (David Proval) complains to Tony's Uncle Junior (Dominic Chianese) about the shoddy treatment they're both getting. Junior warns Richie about the treacherous Janice (Aida Turturro), who's letting Richie hold a gun to her head during sex. As payment for the massive gambling debt of his old pal, Davey Scatino (Robert Patrick), Tony and his crew take over Davey's outdoor store, running up the limit on all of Davey's lines of credit, intending to sell the merchandise on the street and bankrupt the business. A depressed Davey sleeps in a tent in his store, never returning home and contemplating suicide. Meanwhile, Pussy (Vincent Pastore) gives the FBI a list of investors in the Webistics scam and Tony's wife, Carmela (Edie Falco), has a crush on virile, widowed wallpaper hanger Vic Musto (Joe Penny), Davey's brother-in-law. Their flirtation threatens to become something more, but then Vic meets Davey for lunch and learns that Carmela's husband is a mob kingpin who has ruined Davey's family. Vic offers to pay for the college tuition of his nephew and breaks off his friendship with Carmela, sending an assistant to finish the wallpaper job. Tony learns that the witness against him learned of his identity and is now refusing to testify. The mob boss is so elated, he walks out of a therapy session with Dr. Melfi (Lorraine Bracco). His daughter, Meadow (Jamie-Lynn Sigler), learns that she's been accepted at some top colleges, giving the family cause for celebration. "Bust-Out," which was called "Deus Ex Machina" until a last-minute title change, originally aired March 19, 2000. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: From Where to Eternity Series co-star Michael Imperioli, who also wrote the feature film Summer of Sam (1999), penned the script for this episode of the popular pay-television drama. Shot several times in the previous episode, Soprano family lieutenant Christopher Moltisanti (Imperioli) clings to life in a hospital and has an out-of-body experience that brings him into contact with his ghosts of his late father and a slain former associate, Mikey Palmice, in the afterlife. Shaken up by Christopher's account of his supernatural journey, Paulie Walnuts (Tony Sirico) visits a psychic, a priest, and even Palmice's widow, convinced he'll go to Hell when he dies. Mafia boss Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) receives a tip regarding the whereabouts of Matt Bevilaqua (Lillo Brancato Jr.), one of the gunmen who shot Christopher, and pays Matt a lethal visit with Big Pussy (Vincent Pastore), who's forced to commit murder despite being a federal informant. Hearing about the illegitimate child borne by another mobster's mistress, Carmela (Edie Falco) urges her husband Tony to get a vasectomy, as she's aware of his affair with a Russian girl, Irina (Oksana Babiy). Tony insists the affair is over, but Carmela is highly skeptical. Janice (Aida Turturro) continues to pressure her boyfriend, Richie Aprile (David Proval), to move against her brother Tony. Tony blows up at his son, Anthony Jr. (Robert Iler), and then tries to rectify the situation by spending time with him. Tony also attempts to be a good husband; he tells Carmela he'll get a vasectomy, but she tells Tony she's changed her mind and may want another child. Dr. Melfi (Lorraine Bracco) confesses during a visit with her psychiatrist Dr. Kupferberg (Peter Bogdanovich) that she has made an unholy alliance with her notorious client and that she's becoming increasingly dependent upon alcohol and pills. "From Where to Eternity" first aired on March 12, 2000. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: D-Girl Movie stars Jon Favreau, Sandra Bernhard, and Janeane Garofalo make cameo appearances as themselves in this episode of the hit HBO series that finds a Mafia wiseguy flirting with Hollywood. Mob lieutenant Christopher Moltisanti (Michael Imperioli), who abandoned the screenplay he was secretly writing, finds himself bitten by the show business bug once again when he meets the beautiful Amy (Alicia Witt), a development executive working on a new film with actor Jon Favreau. Christopher and Favreau meet, and the actor appropriates some of Christopher's real-life crime anecdotes for a script. Despite the fact that Amy is his cousin's girlfriend, Christopher sleeps with her. In the Soprano household, Anthony Jr. (Robert Iler) is causing his parents grief with his new apathy. After flunking most of his classes, he gets into a car accident and explains to his parents, Tony (James Gandolfini) and Carmela (Edie Falco), that he's discovered Existentialsim, and that life is absurd and meaningless. A visit with his grandmother, Livia (Nancy Marchand), is no help, as her world view is even darker and more depressing. At his confirmation party, Anthony is caught smoking pot, so his sponsor Big Pussy (Vincent Pastore), explains to Anthony that his father is a "stand-up guy," despite the fact that Big P is betraying Tony and is reluctantly wearing a wire so the Feds can record his conversations. Pussy ends up weeping in the bathroom while his FBI contact Skip (Louis Lombardi) listens in. Informed by a jealous Adriana (Drea de Matteo) that her boyfriend Christopher is dreaming of Hollywood again, Tony delivers an ultimatum to his lieutenant at the party, forcing him to choose between the movies the mob. "D-Girl" originally aired February 27, 2000. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Toodle-Fucking-oo A lethal new character joins the Soprano family in this episode of the original cable series, directed by Lee Tamhori. Mob boss Anthony Soprano (James Gandolfini) receives a call from the police, but it's not his illegal activities they're concerned with; his daughter Meadow (Jamie-Lynn Sigler) has thrown a party at the unoccupied house of Tony's mother, Livia (Nancy Marchand), and one of her teenage friends has overdosed on drugs. Tony and his wife, Carmela (Edie Falco), feel powerless to control their daughter, and give her only a token punishment, but Carmela is infuriated when Tony's sister, Janice (Aida Turturro), attempts to intervene with some unwanted child-rearing advice. Richie Aprile (David Proval), the hair-trigger-tempered brother of deceased boss Jackie Aprile, is released from prison after ten years, embittered over his loss of power. He pushes for the position and money he feels rightfully belong to him, but Tony urges Richie to be patient. Although he's indebted to Richie, pizza shop owner Beansie (Paul Herman) refuses to knuckle under and pay tribute, so Richie viciously runs over him in a parking lot, then backs up over Beansie again, crippling his one-time friend. Richie struggles with his inner demons at yoga class, where he runs into Janice, a former flame. Richie seeks to stoke the fires of romance with Janice again by visiting her and her mother, Livia (Nancy Marchand), at the hospital. Tony's cold to Dr. Melfi (Lorraine Bracco) when they bump into each other at a restaurant, and Melfi is haunted by her cheery "Toodle-oo" to the powerful mob boss. "Toodle-Fucking-oo" originally aired January 30, 2000. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Commendatori This episode of the original cable TV series was shot on-location in Italy. New Jersey mob boss Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) travels with his top lieutenants, Paulie Walnuts (Tony Sirico) and Christopher Moltisanti (Michael Imperioli), to Naples, where he intends to negotiate a lucrative new deal for the car-jacking operation he's taken over from his Uncle Junior (Dominic Chianese). While Paulie attempts to ingratiate himself with the locals with little success, Christopher holes up in his hotel room with Tanno (Giuseppe Zeno), a new acquaintance, on a drug-addled bender that lasts the entire trip. Tony discovers that his distant relative Don Zi Vittorio (Vittorio Duse) has become senile, and that Zi's voluptuous, intelligent daughter, Annalisa (Sofia Milos), is the true boss. Tony is powerfully attracted to Annalisa, who reminds him of Dr. Melfi (Lorraine Bracco), but he has a difficult time negotiating business with a woman. They agree on a price for the stolen cars and Tony recruits one of Annalisa's most valuable men, Furio Giunta (Federico Castelluccio), to be his new enforcer. Back at home in the U.S., Angie Bompensiero (Toni Kalem) confesses to Carmela Soprano (Edie Falco) that she's unhappy in her marriage to Pussy (Vincent Pastore) and wants out, but Carmela, already questioning her marriage to Tony, urges Angie to stick with her husband. Spotted by an old acquaintance while meeting with his FBI contact, Pussy is later forced to murder his friend with a hammer. "Commendatori" aired Feburary 6, 2000. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Big Girls Don't Cry In this episode of the popular cable TV series, mob chief Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) returns to therapy, a new lieutenant makes a powerful impression, and a legendary director tries his hand at acting in a multi-episode story arc. Tony reorganizes his crew, promoting Silvio Dante (Steve Van Zandt) and Paulie Walnuts (Tony Sirico) to share an underboss role, while leaving Big Pussy (Vincent Pastore) at the same level as Christopher (Michael Imperioli) and Furio (Federico Castelluccio). This infuriates Pussy, who becomes less reluctant to share information with the FBI, while Furio, now working for Artie Bucco (John Ventimiglia) as a mozzarella maker, is ordered to lean on the owner of a whorehouse, whose delinquent payments are Christopher's responsibility. Christopher, however, is wrapped up in an acting class given to him as a gift by his girlfriend, Adriana (Drea de Matteo). Tony, while he should be happy that he's not under indictment and business is booming, is having fits and tantrums. It's partly the stress of discovering that the renewed romance between his sister, Janice (Aida Turturro), and Richie Aprile (David Proval) is becoming serious, so Tony tries to talk with his counsel, Hesh Rabkin (Jerry Adler), who's of little help. Hesh does reveal, however, that Tony's father also suffered from blackouts. Dr. Melfi (Lorraine Bracco) has been seeing a therapist of her own, Dr. Elliott Kupferberg (Peter Bogdanovich), to whom she reveals her guilt over refusing to treat Tony. Although Kupferberg advises against it, Melfi calls Tony to offer her services, which Tony at first gruffly refuses. Tony relents and appears for his appointment, re-starting his sessions in an effort to gain "total control." "Big Girls Don't Cry" first aired February 13, 2000. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: The Happy Wanderer Frank Sinatra Jr. provides an amusing cameo as himself in this episode of the hit television series. Mob boss Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) tells his therapist, Dr. Jennifer Melfi (Lorraine Bracco), of his anger at all the "happy wanderers" in the world, those without the cares and concerns he suffers. One responsibility that Tony's looking forward to, however, is control of the "executive game," a poker game for high rollers that he's now inherited from Uncle Junior (Dominic Chianese). At a funeral, Tony is forced to deal with the presence of his estranged mother, Livia (Nancy Marchand), who's escorted by Janice (Aida Turturro) and her lover, Richie Aprile (David Proval). Janice is pressuring Richie to stand up to her brother and claim what's rightfully his -- namely, control of the mob family. Against his better judgement, Tony allows his old friend and local sporting goods store owner Davey Scatino (Robert Patrick) into the executive game, despite the fact that Davey's gambling problems have been causing trouble with Richie to the tune of eight grand. Davey loses another 45,000 dollars and tries to convince Soprano friend and restaurant owner Artie Bucco (John Ventimiglia) to loan him the cash to pay Tony and Richie, but Artie can't help. Junior reveals a family secret to Tony about a feeble-minded uncle he never knew he had, and Tony's daughter, Meadow (Jamie-Lynn Sigler), encounters a problem with her classmate Eric when his sport utility vehicle ends up in Soprano hands. "The Happy Wanderer" first aired on February 20, 2000. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Mr. Ruggerio's Neighborhood The third season of the popular HBO crime series opens with the FBI trying to devise a method of bugging the home of New Jersey mob boss Anthony Soprano (James Gandolfini). In the meantime, Tony's daughter Meadow (Jamie-Lynn Sigler) adjusts to life as a freshman at Columbia University, his wife Carmela (Edie Falco) takes tennis lessons, and his son Anthony Jr. (Robert Iler) is more concerned about his skateboard and cigarettes than schoolwork. Tony is also worried about Patsy Parisi (Dan Grimaldi), twin brother of the slain Philly, who was murdered on Tony's orders. His erratic behavior and heavy drinking seem an indication that Patsy knows who's responsible for his brother's death, causing Tony and his lieutenants to keep a close watch on the embittered soldier. "Mr. Ruggerio's Neighborhood" was written by series creator David Chase. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Employee of the Month A violent sexual assault followed by justice aborted due to a legal technicality leaves Dr. Melfi (Lorraine Bracco) flirting with the idea of using her mob connection to get revenge in this powerful episode of the cable crime drama. When she's raped in the stairwell of her office building, Dr. Melfi expects the attacker to be prosecuted, but an improper police procedure results in the rapist getting off. After she recognizes her rapist at a fast food restaurant where he works, she considers telling her mob boss client Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) about the incident, knowing he'll exact retribution, but the therapist remains silent. In the meantime, Tony deals with his uppity subordinate, Ralph Cifaretto (Joe Pantoliano), by promoting one of Ralph's garbage business associates in his stead, and Tony's sister, Janice (Aida Turturro), has a violent run-in with Russian gangsters over a stolen prosthetic leg. Some good news comes Tony's way when he learns of a new 25-million-dollar waterfront project coming into his territory, but the appearance of new neighbor Johnny Sack (Vincent Curatola), a powerful New York crime boss, is a cause for concern. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: University The violence toward women characteristic of this hit cable drama's third season continues with shocking brutality in this heartbreaking episode. New Jersey mob boss Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) resists the efforts of one of his needy young go-go dancers, Tracee (Ariel Kiley), to become "friends." He's got enough problems at home with his own daughter, Meadow (Jamie-Lynn Sigler), who has been giving him the silent treatment over her father's prejudice toward her mixed-race boyfriend. When the boyfriend casually dumps Meadow, however, she's furious, hurling invective at her family and slamming doors. Meanwhile, Tracee has become pregnant with the child of Tony's garbage business underling, Ralph Cifaretto (Joe Pantoliano), who reacts with a typically uncaring attitude. When Tracee insults Ralph in front of his friends and business partners, he meets her outside Tony's strip club and brutally beats her to death. Tony reacts violently, attacking Ralph and violating the code of la cosa nostra. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: He Is Risen Accomplished character actress Annabella Sciorra joins the cast of this popular crime series. As Thanksgiving approaches, New Jersey mob boss Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) deals with the fallout of his beating his garbage business subordinate Ralph Cifaretto (Joe Pantoliano). A violation of the Mafia code, Tony's now obliged to either kill Ralph or apologize, but finds himself loathe to do either -- and instead embarks on a torrid affair with a beautiful but troubled Mercedes Benz dealership sales rep, Gloria Trillo (Sciorra). In the meantime, Tony's daughter Meadow (Jamie-Lynn Sigler) has begun dating shiftless Jackie Aprile Jr. (Jason Cerbone), the wannabe gangster son of Tony's one-time boss. While Jackie Jr.'s mother (Sharon Angela) is thrilled at the union, Tony and his wife Carmela (Edie Falco) are less enthused about the young man's questionable prospects. The holidays bring resolution to at least one of Tony's problems: when a Soprano family crew boss dies unexpectedly, Tony's able to heal the rift with Ralph by promoting him to captain, a position of authority Cifaretto has long craved. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Pine Barrens Elements of the darkly humorous Fargo (1996) are recalled in this Emmy-nominated episode directed by one of that classic film's stars, Steve Buscemi. A simple collection from a Russian goes awry when he and Soprano family mobster Paulie Walnuts (Tony Sirico) exchange words, then blows. Determining that the desolate Pine Barrens of Southern New Jersey are the perfect dumping grounds for the Russian's body, Paulie drags soldier Christopher Moltisanti (Michael Imperioli) with him, promising a night in Atlantic City once the corpse has been disposed of. Things don't unfold as planned, however; their victim isn't dead and turns out to be a former Army commando who assaults them, then escapes. Disoriented, Paulie and Christopher can't find their way back to the car and end up spending a frozen night in the woods. Meantime, the Mafia organization's boss Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) learns that his new lover Gloria Trillo (Annabella Sciorra) has an unstable, violent streak, and his daughter Meadow (Jamie-Lynn Sigler) sees another side of her boyfriend Jackie Aprile Jr. (Jason Cerbone). ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Army of One The third season of the hit HBO crime series comes to a close in this memorable episode. After he brokers a peace agreement between two of his captains, Ralph Cifaretto (Joe Pantoliano) and Paulie Walnuts (Tony Sirico), New Jersey mob boss Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) must handle a domestic crisis. It seems his son Anthony Jr. (Robert Iler) has been expelled from his high school for cheating on a math test. Enraged, Tony tells his wife Carmela (Edie Falco) that their only option is military school, but she fights her husband on the decision. In hiding after a botched robbery attempt on some made men, Jackie Aprile Jr. (Jason Cerbone) is gunned down on the orders of Ralph, and the young man's funeral leaves his ex-girlfriend Meadow Soprano (Jamie-Lynn Sigler) distraught. After seeing Jackie in his coffin, Carmela reconsiders Anthony Jr.'s fate, but then the boy blacks out while trying on his new school uniform, suffering from the same anxiety-produced seizures as his father, rendering him unfit for duty. At a wake for Jackie, a frustrated Paulie forges a new alliance with rival mob boss Johnny Sack (Vincent Curatola) and a drunken Meadow makes a spectacle of herself while her Uncle Junior (Dominic Chianese) is singing. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Amour Fou The climactic ends of two unadvisable relationships have grim consequences in this gripping episode of the hit cable crime series. A heated argument with his mentally unhinged, illicit lover Gloria Trillo (Annabella Sciorra) leads to a near-homicide for New Jersey mob boss Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini). Although he nearly chokes the woman upon realizing that she's a carbon copy of his other, Tony backs off and sends his enforcer Patsy Parisi (Dan Grimaldi) to deliver a message to Gloria: the romance is over, and so is her life if she reveals their secret affair. Meanwhile, Tony's wife Carmela (Edie Falco) makes her first tentative moves toward independence, taking off the jewelry her husband bought her with ill-gotten gains and studying for a real estate license exam. Also, the budding romance between Tony's daughter Meadow (Jamie-Lynn Sigler) and wiseguy wannabe Jackie April Jr. (Jason Cerbone) has ended, leading Jackie to pull a dangerous stunt: the rip-off of a high-stakes Mafia card game. Gunfire is exchanged and although Jackie barely escapes with his life, his future is in serious doubt when Tony hands over final authority in the matter to his bloodthirsty captain, Ralph Cifaretto (Joe Pantoliano), who's unlikely to be influenced by his relationship with Jackie's mother. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: To Save Us All From Satan's Power A Mafia chieftain becomes uncharacteristically reflective as Christmas approaches in this episode of the cable TV drama. New Jersey mob boss Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) is experiencing a sense of loss over the death of his friend Pussy Bompensiero, who traditionally played Santa Claus at Tony's annual charity bash. Tony's feelings of woe are compounded by his discovery of his daughter's boyfriend, wiseguy wannabe Jackie Aprile Jr. (Jason Cerbone), receiving a lap dance from a stripper at a go-go club; Tony gives the college dropout a solid beating. In the meantime, a Russian money launderer friend of Tony's gives him a little holiday gift: the identity of the ruffian who viciously assaulted his sister Janice (Aida Turturro). Tony and his lieutenant Furio give the man a beating as a holiday gift to Janice, and on Christmas morning, a chastened Jackie shows up with a gift for Tony's daughter Meadow (Jamie-Lynn Sigler) and an attitude adjustment for her father. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Second Opinion Dealing with health care professionals of various stripes proves to be an arduous task for two members of a crime family in this episode of the hit cable TV series. When his Uncle Junior (Dominic Chianese) undergoes a not-entirely successful cancer treatment at the hands of less-than-compassionate Dr. John Kennedy (Sam McMurray), New Jersey mob boss Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) is furious. So he schedules a threatening heart-to-heart with the surgeon on the golf course that leaves Junior in the doctor's suddenly far more caring hands. In the meantime, Tony's wife Carmela (Edie Falco) is referred to a blunt psychotherapist (Mike Nichols), who tells her that she's complicit in her husband's crimes and will never be happy unless she leaves him. In the meantime, Tony's lieutenants Paulie Walnuts (Tony Sirico) and Christopher Moltisanti (Michael Imperioli) continue to clash over their new business arrangements, and Tony deals with the financial concerns of the widowed Angie Bompensiero (Toni Kalem) by smashing the window of her new Cadillac. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Another Toothpick New Jersey mob kingpin Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) is finally joined by his wife, Carmela (Edie Falco), for a contentious session with his therapist, Dr. Jennifer Melfi (Lorraine Bracco), in this episode of the hit HBO drama series. When his frustrations lead to a traffic ticket from officious trooper Wilmore (Charles S. Dutton) on the way home, an angry Tony tells his corrupt state assemblyman, Zellman (Peter Riegert), to "fix it." Compounding Tony's frustrations and concerns is the fact that his Uncle Junior (Dominic Chianese) has cancer, a family associate has been put in a coma by an unprovoked attack, and a dying former gangster (Burt Young) has been assigned a retaliatory hit. Then there's Tony's daughter, Meadow (Jamie-Lynn Sigler), still not speaking to her father because of his racist attitudes, and his restaurant-owner friend Artie Bucco (John Ventimiglia) has a crush on his nephew's girlfriend, Adriana (Drea de Matteo). When Tony goes to Fountains of Wayne to pick up a backyard ornament, he discovers that Officer Wilmore has been reduced to a part-time job because his run-in with Tony has had political repercussions. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Fortunate Son New Jersey mob boss Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) makes a breakthrough in his therapy with Dr. Melfi (Lorraine Bracco) in this episode of the hit drama series. Remembering that his first "spell" occurred when he was 11 years old, Tony suddenly realizes that all of his blackouts have occurred when he was preparing meat. This revelation forces him to confront a painful memory about his father and recently deceased mother. Meanwhile, Tony's nephew, Christopher (Michael Imperioli), bungles his new responsibilities of a "made man" and is forced to hold up a Rutgers University box office to pay his weekly payment to Paulie Walnuts (Tony Sirico). A feud between Tony's sister, Janice (Aida Turturro), and their late mother's housekeeper, Svetlana, heats up, resulting in a stolen artificial leg, while Meadow (Jamie-Lynn Sigler) gives her dad Tony the silent treatment, and Anthony Jr. (Robert Iler) excels on the football field. When he's promoted for his gridiron performance, however, A.J. blacks out under the pressure, just like his dad. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Proshai, Livushka Some computer-generated imagery summons the ghost of a departed cast member for one final appearance in this turning point episode of the hit crime drama. After learning that his daughter Meadow (Jamie-Lynn Sigler) is dating a half Jewish, half African-American student at Columbia, New Jersey mob boss Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) has a stress-related anxiety attack and blackout. His problems are compounded when, after a contentious visit with his mother Livia (Nancy Marchand), he receives word that the manipulative matriarch has died of a stroke. Tony's flower-child sister, Janice (Aida Tuturro), insists on a memorial service but gets more than she bargained for when assembled family members share their true feelings about the less-than-dearly departed. At a session with his therapist, Dr. Jennifer Melfi (Lorraine Bracco), Tony about sums it up by confiding that he's glad his mother is gone. A key witness against him in a case involving stolen airline tickets, Livia is now silenced forever, and her emotional passive-aggression is no longer a part of his life. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Eloise While Carmela and Furio deal with unspoken feelings, a disagreement leads to problems between the two families. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: No-Show An off-color joke made by Ralph has the potential to create problems. Meanwhile, Christopher's ascension within the ranks leads to bitterness. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Whitecaps In the fourth season finale, Tony and Carmela's relationship begins to crumble under the weight of their marital problems, and Junior's trial concludes. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Whoever Did This The rift between Tony and Ralph reaches a crescendo. Meanwhile, Junior hopes to avoid trial. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Calling All Cars Tensions mount between the New Jersey and New York families over a housing scam. Meanwhile, Tony has another vivid dream and Bobby is bereft with grief. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: The Strong, Silent Type After Christopher's substance abuse gets out of hand, Tony organizes an intervention. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Christopher While Junior's trial begins, Silvio and Artie attempt to thwart a protest of the annual Columbus Day parade. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Everybody Hurts Tony learns of a former comare's death, and Artie Bucco enters into a dubious business arrangement. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: The Weight Animosity grows between Johnny Sack and Ralphi, while attraction blooms between Carmela and Furio. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Watching Too Much Television Following Paulie's release from prison, Tony and Ralph discuss a housing scam with Zellman. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: For All Debts Public and Private The fourth season premiere finds Junior struggling to pay his legal costs and Adriana befriending an undercover FBI agent. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Pie-O-My Echoing his past admiration of animals, Tony becomes enamored with a race horse. Meanwhile, a grieving Bobby finds solace with Janice. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Mergers & Acquisitions While Paulie's mother has trouble adjusting to her new retirement home, a woman comes between Tony and Ralph. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Where's Johnny Stricken with dementia, Uncle Junior wanders out on his own. Meanwhile, Feech La Manna becomes a potential liability. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: All Happy Families While Carmela loses control of AJ, Tony looks for a way to deal with the aging Feech La Manna. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Irregular Around the Margins An auto accident involving Tony and Adriana leads to rampant suspicion that the two are having an affair. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Sentimental Education While Carmela re-enters the dating scene, the recently paroled Tony Blundetto tries his hand at a civilian job. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Marco Polo The recently paroled Tony Blundetto is offered some work by the New York family, while the Soprano household plays host to a big party in honor of Carmela's father's 75th birthday. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: The Test Dream After an old friend is murdered by members of the New York family, Tony Blundetto makes a careless and unauthorized move. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Unidentified Black Males Tony Soprano learns of a misdeed committed by Tony Blundetto and attempts to cover for his cousin. Meanwhile, Finn gets a construction job and learns a shocking secret about Vito. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Rat Pack After a long prison sentence, Tony's cousin Tony Blundetto is paroled and finds the world a changed place. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Two Tonys In the fifth season opener, AJ and Carmela are shocked to encounter a ferocious bear in the backyard. Meanwhile, Tony attempts to court Dr. Melfi. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: All Due Respect In the fifth season finale, Tony finds the situation with his cousin Tony Blundetto beginning to affect his own people and realizes he must make a decision. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Long Term Parking With pressure from the FBI increasing on her, Adriana comes clean with Christopher about her role as an informant. Meanwhile, Tony attempts to protect his cousin. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Cold Cuts Christopher and Tony Blundetto visit a rural farm to move some corpses, while back in New Jersey, Janice's temper gets the best of her. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: In Camelot While Tony meets his father's old comare who reveals some surprising things about the elder Soprano, Junior grapples with his own mortality. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Join the Club Following his shooting at the hands of Uncle Junior, Tony finds himself in a comatose dream state. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: The Fleshy Part of the Thigh Tony befriends an aging scientist and a celebrity rapper while recuperating in the hospital. Meanwhile, a dying aunt drops a bombshell on Paulie. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Live Free or Die After Vito's secret life as a homosexual becomes public knowledge, he takes off to hide out in New Hampshire. Back in Jersey, Tony grapples with how to handle the situation. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Johnny Cakes While Vito finds something unexpected in New Hampshire, Tony meets an attractive realtor and AJ makes a rash decision about Uncle Junior. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Cold Stones Vito finally returns to face the family about his homosexuality. Meanwhile, Carmela vacations abroad and has a disturbin
  • 30 Rock: Seasons 1-3

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Nov 24, 2009

    Includes:30 Rock: Jack Meets Dennis (2006) 30 Rock: Jack-Tor (2006) 30 Rock: The Break Up (2006) 30 Rock: The Aftermath (2006) 30 Rock: Blind Date (2006) 30 Rock: Jack the Writer (2006) 30 Rock: Pilot (2006) 30 Rock: The Rural Juror (2006) 30 Rock: The "C" Word (2006) 30 Rock: Tracy Does Conan (2006) 30 Rock: Black Tie (2007) 30 Rock: Cleveland (2007) 30 Rock: Corporate Crush (2007) 30 Rock: Fireworks (2007) 30 Rock: The Fighting Irish (2007) 30 Rock: The Source Awards (2007) 30 Rock: Hardball (2007) 30 Rock: Up All Night (2007) 30 Rock: The Head and the Hair (2007) 30 Rock: The Baby Show (2007) 30 Rock: Ludachristmas (2007) 30 Rock: SeinfeldVision (2007) 30 Rock: Jack Gets in the Game (2007) 30 Rock: The Collection (2007) 30 Rock: Rosemary's Baby (2007) 30 Rock: Greenzo (2007) 30 Rock: Somebody to Love (2007) 30 Rock: Cougars (2007) 30 Rock: Secrets and Lies (2007) 30 Rock: Hiatus (2007) 30 Rock: Cooter (2008) 30 Rock: Succession (2008) 30 Rock: Episode 2.10 (2008) 30 Rock: Subway Hero (2008) 30 Rock: Sandwich Day (2008) 30 Rock: Christmas Special (2008) 30 Rock: Reunion (2008) 30 Rock: Gavin Volure (2008) 30 Rock: The One with the Cast of Night Court (2008) 30 Rock: Believe in the Stars (2008) 30 Rock: Do-Over (2008) 30 Rock: MILF Island (2008) 30 Rock: Cutbacks (2009) 30 Rock: The Natural Order (2009) 30 Rock: The Ones (2009) 30 Rock: Jackie Jormp-Jomp (2009) 30 Rock: Apollo, Apollo (2009) 30 Rock: The Bubble (2009) 30 Rock: The Funcooker (2009) 30 Rock: Goodbye, My Friend (2009) 30 Rock: Larry King (2009) 30 Rock: St. Valentine's Day (2009) 30 Rock: Generalissimo (2009) 30 Rock: Retreat to Move Forward (2009) 30 Rock: Flu Shot (2009) 30 Rock: Senor Macho Solo (2009) 30 Rock: Mama Mia (2009) 30 Rock: Kidney Now! (2009) 30 Rock: Jack Meets Dennis No synopsis available. 30 Rock: Jack-Tor No synopsis available. 30 Rock: The Break Up No synopsis available. 30 Rock: The Aftermath No synopsis available. 30 Rock: Blind Date No synopsis available. 30 Rock: Jack the Writer No synopsis available. 30 Rock: Pilot Take a look at the chaos that unfolds behind the scenes of a live sketch comedy television series in the hit NBC series starring former SNL Weekend Update correspondent Tina Fey, former SNL cast member Tracy Morgan, and longtime screen star Alec Baldwin. In the premiere episode of 30 Rock, Liz (Fey) scrambles to find an act to replace the sketch of hers that has been cut from The Girlie Show at the last minute. Later, Liz and producer Pete (Scott Adsit) have a somewhat disenchanting meeting with new VP of Programming Jack Donaghy (Baldwin), who comes off as exceptionally arrogant and appears to want to change the entire format of the show. Additionally, Donaghy makes some sizable waves when he suggests bringing in controversial actor Tracy Jordan (Morgan) as the new star of the series. While Liz does eventually agree to meet with Tracy, the actor proves somewhat unpredictable and eventually drags her out to a soul food restaurant and a nearby strip club. Upon learning that Jack has fired Pete, Liz informs Tracy that she is going to quit The Girlie Show but Pete implores her not to quit over his firing. ~ Jason Buchanan, All Movie Guide 30 Rock: The Rural Juror No synopsis available. 30 Rock: The "C" Word No synopsis available. 30 Rock: Tracy Does Conan No synopsis available. 30 Rock: Black Tie No synopsis available. 30 Rock: Cleveland No synopsis available. 30 Rock: Corporate Crush No synopsis available. 30 Rock: Fireworks No synopsis available. 30 Rock: The Fighting Irish No synopsis available. 30 Rock: The Source Awards No synopsis available. 30 Rock: Hardball No synopsis available. 30 Rock: Up All Night No synopsis available. 30 Rock: The Head and the Hair No synopsis available. 30 Rock: The Baby Show No synopsis available. 30 Rock: Ludachristmas The staffers celebrate the holidays with a party---which comes complete with a lusty Santa. The festive occasion marks the arrival of Liz's parents (Buck Henry, Anita Gillette) and her brother (Andy Richter), a fortysomething man with memory loss who thinks he's a high-school senior. Another (unexpected) guest: Jack's mother (Elaine Stritch), who decidedly lacks Christmas cheer. ~ Dean Maurer, All Movie Guide 30 Rock: SeinfeldVision As the 30 Rockers return from summer hiatus, Liz continues her battles with Jack, whose latest ploy involves inserting clips from Seinfeld into current shows, an act that doesn't sit well with one Jerry Seinfeld (who appears as himself). Meanwhile, Jenna sees her waistline widen after starring in the play "Mystic Pizza: The Musical!" ~ Dean Maurer, All Movie Guide 30 Rock: Jack Gets in the Game Jack goes head-to-head against his archenemy, Devin Banks (Will Arnett), when both swoop in to take the job of possibly retiring GE honcho Don Geiss (Rip Torn). Meanwhile, Jenna's plus-size figure brings her newfound fame; and Kenneth sets out to reconnect Tracy with his wife (Sherri Shepherd). ~ Dean Maurer, All Movie Guide 30 Rock: The Collection Jack worries that ownership will unearth damaging information about him, so he enlists a private investigator (Steve Buscemi) to ward the company off. Meanwhile, Tracy's wife shadows her husband's every move to keep him in line. And Jenna, basking in the newfound celebrity her weight gain has given her, begins to lose pounds. ~ Dean Maurer, All Movie Guide 30 Rock: Rosemary's Baby Liz hires her idol, Rosemary Howard (Carrie Fisher), to be a guest writer on the show, but Rosemary's radical ideology causes much friction. Meanwhile, Jack takes Tracy to a therapist; and Kenneth's job is jeopardized. ~ Dean Maurer, All Movie Guide 30 Rock: Greenzo Al Gore, Meredith Vieira, and David Schwimmer guest star in this episode, in which Jack concocts an eco-friendly mascot for the network named Greenzo (Schwimmer). But Greenzo's self-righteous sermonizing soon grows tiresome and obnoxious. Meanwhile, Kenneth plans to throw his annual (and overly boring) house party. ~ Dean Maurer, All Movie Guide 30 Rock: Somebody to Love When an unlikely romance blossoms between Jack and a Democratic congresswoman (Edie Falco), the couple disregard their vast political differences and keep their new love a secret. Meanwhile, Liz suspects her neighbor (Fred Armisen) is a terrorist. ~ Dean Maurer, All Movie Guide 30 Rock: Cougars Tracy steps up to the plate when he coaches a rough-and-tumble inner-city Little League team as part of his community service, but Jack causes complications when he sets out to make the team a winner. Back at the Rock, a hunky young coffee guy woos Liz, despite their 17-year age difference. ~ Dean Maurer, All Movie Guide 30 Rock: Secrets and Lies Jack and C.C. face a romantic test when she suggests going public with their odd-couple relationship. Meanwhile, Liz tries to satisfy the diva needs of her two stars, Tracy and Jenna. Political commentator James Carville makes an appearance. ~ Dean Maurer, All Movie Guide 30 Rock: Hiatus No synopsis available. 30 Rock: Cooter Jack takes on new political work in Washington, D.C., but when the job doesn't meet his expectations, he enlists his ex-flame C.C. and a government staffer (Matthew Broderick) to help him get fired. Elsewhere, Liz faces a pregnancy scare; Kenneth aspires to be a page at the Olympics; and Tracy puts the final touches on his invention. ~ Dean Maurer, All Movie Guide 30 Rock: Succession High-profile corporate changes are in the air when chairman Don Geiss reveals that Jack will be his successor instead of Jack's nemesis, Devin Banks. But unforeseen health issues could change all that. Meanwhile, Tracy believes that his showbiz career embarrasses his son. ~ Dean Maurer, All Movie Guide 30 Rock: Episode 2.10 As Jack wheels and deals with German TV bigwigs to close a huge television project, he also works to keep his long-distance romance with C.C. alive and well. Meanwhile, Liz buys into real estate. And here's the buzz on Kenneth: He becomes addicted to caffeinated coffee. Singer Gladys Knight guest stars ~ Dean Maurer, All Movie Guide 30 Rock: Subway Hero Jack hopes to book a hot hero who prevented a terrible subway accident. It turns out the man is none other than Liz's ex-flame Dennis (Dean Winters), who tries to win back her heart. Meanwhile, Jack futilely searches for a hip Republican celebrity, with only aging 1940s TV star Bucky Bright (Tim Conway) emerging. Not to be outdone, Jack turns to Tracy to represent Republicans. ~ Dean Maurer, All Movie Guide 30 Rock: Sandwich Day Liz's ex-flame Floyd (Jason Sudeikis) returns to the Big Apple and looks for a place to stay overnight. Meanwhile, Jack worries about his future at the company when he's moved to a different floor; and the staffers relish Sandwich Day with sandwiches from a mysterious, unnamed shop. ~ Dean Maurer, All Movie Guide 30 Rock: Christmas Special When her parents ditch her during the holidays, a lonely Liz devotes herself to a charity program. Meanwhile, Jack's highly anticipated holiday plans are scratched, and he takes out his frustrations on the crew. And the staffers must drop all their plans to produce a Christmas special. Elaine Stritch guest stars. ~ Dean Maurer, All Movie Guide 30 Rock: Reunion Jack cajoles a reluctant Liz to attend her high-school reunion. Meanwhile, GE bigwig Don Geiss (Rip Torn), roused from his prolonged coma, delivers a stunning CEO announcement. Shocked by the news, Jack vents by accompanying Liz to her reunion. ~ Dean Maurer, All Movie Guide 30 Rock: Gavin Volure Jack and Liz visit Gavin Volure (Steve Martin), a colorful businessman who has a confidential business proposal---and who promptly falls for Liz. Meanwhile, Tracy fears that his children have concocted sinister plans against him. ~ Dean Maurer, All Movie Guide 30 Rock: The One with the Cast of Night Court Liz and Jenna receive a visit from their pal (Jennifer Aniston), a romantic prowler who sets her sights on landing Jack. Meanwhile, new page uniforms depress Kenneth, so Tracy tries to raise his spirits with a surprise involving the "Night Court" cast. Appearing: Harry Anderson, Markie Post and Charlie Robinson. ~ Dean Maurer, All Movie Guide 30 Rock: Believe in the Stars When Liz is assigned a seat next to Oprah Winfrey (playing herself) on an airplane, she hounds the sage talk-show host for personal advice. Meanwhile, a feuding Tracy and Jenna switch roles to determine whose life is harder; and Jack's value system is tested by Kenneth and an Olympics debacle. ~ Dean Maurer, All Movie Guide 30 Rock: Do-Over In the Season 3 opener, Liz hopes to adopt a child, but first she must impress an adoption evaluator (Megan Mullally). Meanwhile, a demoted Jack tangles yet again with nemesis Devin Banks (Will Arnett) as he tries to climb back up the corporate ladder at 30 Rock. ~ Dean Maurer, All Movie Guide 30 Rock: MILF Island Jack delights in the TV-programming juggernaut that is the reality show "MILF Island," but his happiness is short-lived when an unknown staffer disparages him in a gossip column. Jack, believing the public insult could threaten his push for the chairman position, sets out to identify the disloyal employee. Rob Huebel guest stars as the host of "MILF Island." ~ Dean Maurer, All Movie Guide 30 Rock: Cutbacks Joy about the 50th "TGS" episode turns to worry when word spreads about imminent budget cuts at 30 Rock. Before long, Jack must distribute pink slips, Kenneth takes on new responsibilities, and Liz wheels and deals to spare her staffers from layoffs. Meanwhile, Jenna and Tracy suspect that Kenneth is masking a deep dark secret. ~ Dean Maurer, All Movie Guide 30 Rock: The Natural Order Liz chides Tracy in front of the staffers, which compels Tracy to become more professional and mature. He forfeits all special treatment---but he feels that Liz should do the same. Meanwhile, Jack's tormenting mother (Elaine Stritch) arrives, only to dig up nasty memories about Jack's father. And Jenna adopts a monkey. Steve Buscemi guest stars. ~ Dean Maurer, All Movie Guide 30 Rock: The Ones Jack and Elisa (Salma Hayek) consider taking their romance to the next level, so Jack shops around for an engagement ring, with Liz in tow. Jack also seeks wisdom about the realities of marriage and consults a very unlikely person---Tracy. Meanwhile, a prank goes awry at "TGS," resulting in an injury and a gushing Jenna's encounter with a sightly emergency responder. ~ Dean Maurer, All Movie Guide 30 Rock: Jackie Jormp-Jomp Saddled with a suspension from work, a lost Liz misses all the "TGS" chaos and seeks a way to bide her time. Meanwhile, film bigwigs mull over pulling the plug on Jenna's Janis Joplin movie, so Jack and Jenna try (just a little bit harder) to stir up buzz. ~ Dean Maurer, All Movie Guide 30 Rock: Apollo, Apollo As his 50th birthday approaches, a sentimental Jack tries to re-create happy moments from his boyhood after watching old home movies. Meanwhile, Liz's ex-flame Dennis (Dean Winters) returns, confessing about an addiction and activating catty friction between Liz and Jenna. Then there's Tracy, who focuses on fulfilling a childhood dream. ~ Dean Maurer, All Movie Guide 30 Rock: The Bubble Liz gives attention to her budding relationship with Drew (Jon Hamm), but she discovers that his pleasing appearance has granted him special treatment in life. Meanwhile, Tracy's contract expires, causing Jack to go full throttle in a bid to re-sign him for the show. And Jenna considers getting a new hairstyle in yet another ploy to get public attention. Meredith Vieira guest stars. ~ Dean Maurer, All Movie Guide 30 Rock: The Funcooker When "TGS" den mother Liz is called in to jury duty, the unmanaged cast and crew create havoc at 30 Rock. Meanwhile, Jack fails to heed the staffers when he grows obsessed with launching a new big-money product. Chris Parnell guest stars. ~ Dean Maurer, All Movie Guide 30 Rock: Goodbye, My Friend Liz's baby fever rises when she chums up to a pregnant teenage donut-shop staffer in a bid to adopt her baby. At 30 Rock, Jenna pushes for more attention as her birthday approaches. And Jack participates in a guys' night out, only to connect with Frank over their "daddy issues." John Lithgow and Patti LuPone guest star. ~ Dean Maurer, All Movie Guide 30 Rock: Larry King Jack hopes to take his romance with Elisa (Salma Hayek) to the next level, but balancing work and love proves difficult. Elsewhere, Tracy's interview with Larry King (appearing as himself) causes New York to spiral into citywide chaos. But that doesn't stop Liz from sending Kenneth into the crazed metropolis to retrieve her lost cell phone. Meredith Vieira also guest stars. ~ Dean Maurer, All Movie Guide 30 Rock: St. Valentine's Day Romance sweeps over the 30 Rockers on Valentine's Day: Liz demands that her first official date with Drew (Jon Hamm) be on the lovers' holiday; Jack spends an offbeat date at church with Elisa (Salma Hayek); and Tracy helps Kenneth woo a new hire. ~ Dean Maurer, All Movie Guide 30 Rock: Generalissimo Liz discovers that her new neighbor (Jon Hamm) is a handsome, newly single doctor, but the romantically luckless lass fumbles in her efforts to win his favor. Meanwhile, Jack continues to woo Elisa (Salma Hayek) and tries to impress her grandmother, but his stunning likeness to a Spanish soap villain doesn't help matters. Then there's Tracy, who parties with the new interns but can't measure up to their hard-carousing ways. ~ Dean Maurer, All Movie Guide 30 Rock: Retreat to Move Forward A nervous Jack coaxes Liz into going to a corporate retreat with him. Meanwhile, Jenna prepares for her role as rock icon Janis Joplin by employing method-acting techniques---with help from Frank. And Kenneth sets out to show Tracy that diet has an impact on diabetes. ~ Dean Maurer, All Movie Guide 30 Rock: Flu Shot When the flu quickly spreads around 30 Rock, Liz works to ensure that the staffers receive their shots. Administering the vaccinations: Dr. Spaceman (Chris Parnell). Meanwhile, Elisa (Salma Hayek) is busy and overworked, but that doesn't stop Jack from using novel approaches to spend time with her. ~ Dean Maurer, All Movie Guide 30 Rock: Senor Macho Solo Liz's quest to have a baby takes a peculiar turn when she grows attracted to a new fellow (Peter Dinklage). And Jack's a busy man: He woos his mother's nurse (Salma Hayek); helps Jenna score a role as Janis Joplin; and gives marriage pointers to Tracy and his wife (Sherri Shepherd). ~ Dean Maurer, All Movie Guide 30 Rock: Mama Mia With a reassuring push from Liz and Tracy, Jack begins a quest to find his real father. Meanwhile, Tracy presents his newfound illegitimate son to the "TGS" staffers, but Liz and Pete worry that the son has ulterior motives. And Jenna gets credit for one of Liz's ideas. Alan Alda and Steve Buscemi guest star. ~ Dean Maurer, All Movie Guide 30 Rock: Kidney Now! Season 3 closes with Jack trying to connect with his biological father (Alan Alda), but the elder's health begins to suffer. Elsewhere, Liz gains fame as a relationship expert. Among the music artists appearing: Sheryl Crow; Mary J. Blige; Elvis Costello; Clay Aiken; and Adam Levine of Maroon 5. ~ Dean Maurer, All Movie Guide
  • Taxi: Complete Series

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Dec 22, 2009

    Includes:Taxi: Paper Marriage (1978) Taxi: Money Troubles (1978) Taxi: Like Father, Like Daughter (1978) Taxi: Memories of Cab 804, Part 2 (1978) Taxi: Bobby's Acting Career (1978) Taxi: Blind Date (1978) Taxi: Men are Such Beasts (1978) Taxi: Memories of Cab 804, Part 1 (1978) Taxi: Come as You Aren't (1978) Taxi: A Full House for Christmas (1978) Taxi: High School Reunion (1978) Taxi: One-Punch Banta (1978) Taxi: The Great Line (1978) Taxi: Mama Gravas (1979) Taxi: Elaine and the Lame Duck (1979) Taxi: Substitute Father (1979) Taxi: Alex Tastes Death and Finds a Nice Restaurant (1979) Taxi: Friends (1979) Taxi: Louie Sees the Light (1979) Taxi: Sugar Mama (1979) Taxi: Bobby's Big Break (1979) Taxi: Hollywood Calling (1979) Taxi: Jim Gets a Pet (1979) Taxi: Nardo Loses Her Marbles (1979) Taxi: The Great Race (1979) Taxi: Elaine's Secret Admirer (1979) Taxi: Louie and the Nice Girl (1979) Taxi: Wherefore Art Thou, Bobby? (1979) Taxi: Reverend Jim: A Space Odyssey (1979) Taxi: The Apartment (1979) Taxi: Latka's Revolting (1979) Taxi: The Lighter Side of Angela Matusa (1979) Taxi: The Reluctant Fighter (1979) Taxi: Louie Meets the Folks (1979) Taxi: Alex's Romance (1979) Taxi: A Woman Between Friends (1979) Taxi: Honor Thy Father (1979) Taxi: Alex Jumps Out of an Airplane (1980) Taxi: Art Work (1980) Taxi: Fantasy Borough, Part 1 (1980) Taxi: Shut it Down, Part 1 (1980) Taxi: Elaine's Strange Triangle (1980) Taxi: Going Home (1980) Taxi: Fathers of the Bride (1980) Taxi: Tony's Sister and Jim (1980) Taxi: Louie's Rival (1980) Taxi: Guess Who's Coming for Brefnish (1980) Taxi: Shut it Down, Part 2 (1980) Taxi: Tony and Brian (1980) Taxi: Fantasy Borough, Part 2 (1980) Taxi: What Price Bobby? (1980) Taxi: Mr. Personalities (1981) Taxi: Fledgling (1981) Taxi: Like Father, Like Son (1981) Taxi: The Ten Percent Solution (1981) Taxi: Bobby and the Critic (1981) Taxi: Zen and the Art of Cab Driving (1981) Taxi: Vienna Waits (1981) Taxi: Latka's Cookies (1981) Taxi: Call of the Mild (1981) Taxi: Louie Goes Too Far (1981) Taxi: Jim the Psychic (1981) Taxi: Louie Bumps Into an Old Lady (1981) Taxi: Jim Joins the Network (1981) Taxi: The Costume Party (1981) Taxi: Louie's Mother (1981) Taxi: On the Job, Part 1 (1981) Taxi: Louie's Mom Remarries (1981) Taxi: On the Job, Part 2 (1981) Taxi: Thy Boss's Wife (1981) Taxi: Of Mice and Tony (1981) Taxi: Out of Commission (1981) Taxi: Bobby's Roommate (1981) Taxi: Elaine's Old Friend (1981) Taxi: Louie's Fling (1981) Taxi: Latka the Playboy (1981) Taxi: Scenskees from a Marriage, Part 1 (1982) Taxi: Tony's Lady (1982) Taxi: Elegant Iggy (1982) Taxi: Crime and Punishment (1982) Taxi: I Wanna Be Around (1982) Taxi: Travels with My Dad (1982) Taxi: Tony's Comeback (1982) Taxi: Get Me Through the Holidays (1982) Taxi: Cooking for Two (1982) Taxi: Zena's Honeymoon (1982) Taxi: Elaine and the Monk (1982) Taxi: Jim and the Kid (1982) Taxi: Nina Loves Alex (1982) Taxi: Alex Goes Off the Wagon (1982) Taxi: Jim's Inheritance (1982) Taxi: Alex the Gofer (1982) Taxi: Scenskees from a Marriage, Part 2 (1982) Taxi: The Wedding of Latka and Simka (1982) Taxi: Simka Returns (1982) Taxi: The Shloogel Show (1982) Taxi: Take My Ex-Wife, Please (1982) Taxi: Louie's Revenge (1982) Taxi: The Road Not Taken, Part 1 (1982) Taxi: The Unkindest Cut (1982) Taxi: Bobby Doesn't Live Here Anymore (1982) Taxi: The Road Not Taken, Part 2 (1982) Taxi: Louie and the Blind Girl (1983) Taxi: Sugar Ray Nardo (1983) Taxi: Simka's Monthlies (1983) Taxi: Alex Gets Burned by an Old Flame (1983) Taxi: A Taxi Celebration, Part 1 (1983) Taxi: A Taxi Celebration, Part 2 (1983) Taxi: A Grand Gesture (1983) Taxi: Alex's Old Buddy (1983) Taxi: Louie Moves Uptown (1983) Taxi: Arnie Meets the Kids (1983) Taxi: Jim's Mario's (1983) Taxi: Tony's Baby (1983) Taxi: Paper Marriage Now that his visa had expired, Latka (Andy Kaufman) must marry an American girl in order to stay in the country. Elected to locate a suitable bride, Alex (Judd Hirsch) shows up with what can euphemistically be described as a "working girl." Although the subsequent wedding ceremony is a sham, it goes along so swimmingly, and with such a genuine outpouring of emotion, that Latka begins to believe it himself. This episode marks the first series appearance of burned-out hippie "Reverend Jim" Ignatowski (Christopher Lloyd), who would become a regular the following season. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Taxi: Money Troubles Collegiate cab driver John Burns (Randall Carver) and his new bride Suzanne (Ellen Regan) have stretched their budget to the breaking point. Although Suzanne's parents have been helping out, they are now retired and unable to provide another penny. It falls to Alex (Judd Hirsch), the only Sunshine Cab employee with a stable bank account, to come to the rescue -- but will he be in time to prevent John and/or Suzanne from dropping out of college? ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Taxi: Like Father, Like Daughter Taxi's very first episode gets under way as would-be art dealer Elaine Nardo (Marilu Henner) strolls into the offices of New York's Sunshine Cab company, looking for a job. After a typically hostile "screening" by dispatcher Louie DePalma (Danny DeVito), Elaine is introduced to her co-workers: Alex Reiger (Judd Hirsch), the garage's "father confessor" and the only full-time cabbie in the bunch; aspiring actor Bobby Wheeler (Jeff Conaway); wannabe boxing champ Tony Banta (Tony Danza); shy, clumsy college student John Burns (Randall Carver); and mechanic Latka Gravas, a thickly accented foreigner from an unpronounceable country. Elaine also joins the cabbies' efforts to reunite Alex with his long-estranged teenage daughter, Cathy (Talia Balsam), who is returning from Brazil after a 15-year separation -- but only long enough to change planes. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Taxi: Memories of Cab 804, Part 2 In the conclusion of a two-part story, mechanic Latka (Andy Kaufman) works day and night to repair cab 804, the oldest taxi in the garage and the "mascot" of the Sunshine Cab Company. Each of the cabbies remembers his or her own special experiences while driving the legendary vehicle. Two special guest stars figure prominently in the proceedings: Tom Selleck is cast as a wealthy passenger who very nearly changed the course of Elaine's (Marilu Henner) life, while Mandy Patinkin plays the husband of a pregnant woman who goes into labor while Alex (Judd Hirsch) is behind the wheel of cab 804. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Taxi: Bobby's Acting Career Taxi briefly moved from its first-season Tuesday night slot to Thursday for this episode in which cab driver and would-be actor Bobby Wheeler (Jeff Conaway) reaches a crossroads in his life. Bobby has given himself three years to land an acting job; if he fails in that period, he'll give up show biz for good. Now, with only 24 hours before the deadline, Bobby has several surprises in store for his friends -- and vice versa. Future Hill Street Blues regular Taurean Blacque is appropriately cast as a cop, while Miami Vice producer Michael Mann also shows up in a pre-celebrity bit part. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Taxi: Blind Date Intrigued by the sexy voice of answering-service operator Angela (Suzanne Kent), Alex (Judd Hirsch) asks her for a date. On the appointed evening, Alex is shocked to discover that Angela is immensely overweight -- and with a bad attitude to boot. Even with so much working against a lasting relationship with Angela, Alex can't help but be attracted to the girl. And yes, this is the same Angela who served as the "inspiration" for Taxi's familiar theme music. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Taxi: Men are Such Beasts Try though he might, Tony (Tony Danza) cannot shed himself of his troublesome girlfriend, an overambitious, overpossessive cab driver named Denise (Gail Edwards). Just it when it appears that Denise has finally taken the hint and removed herself from Tony's life, the girl signs up with the Sunshine Cab Company. Eventually everyone finds out why Denise is so enthusiastic, hardworking, and persistent...she's a habitual pill popper. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Taxi: Memories of Cab 804, Part 1 In the first episode of a two-part story, klutzy John Burns (Randall Carver) smashes up cab 804, the oldest vehicle in the garage and the unofficial "mascot" of the Sunshine Cab Company. As Latka (Andy Kaufman) struggles to save cab 804 from the junkyard, the other cabbies recall their own experiences while driving the legendary taxi. Highlights in this episode include Tony's (Tony Danza) encounter with a would-be suicide (played by Taxi co-creator Ed Weinberger), and Bobby's (Jeff Conaway) slapstick standoff with an inept robber. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Taxi: Come as You Aren't While preparing a cocktail party for a group of high-profile art dealers, Elaine (Marilu Henner) invites Alex (Judd Hirsch) to attend the soiree to provide some moral support. More than a few feelings are hurt when, on the night of the party, Elaine begs Alex not to tell anyone that he is "only" a cab driver. But the jig is up for both Elaine and Alex when a very special guest arrives. Emmy-winning TV writer Treva Silverman appears as Latka's "date." ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Taxi: A Full House for Christmas Christmas is hardly a time of peace on earth and good will to men for Louie (Danny DeVito), especially when his prodigal brother Nick (Richard Forojny) shows up for the holidays. A reckless Las Vegas gambler, Nick insists he has changed his ways and will devote more time to his neglected mother. But the call of the cards and chips proves too strong -- and ultimately the future of Nicky, Danny and everyone in the garage hinges on a single hand of poker. Originally, Nicky was to have been played by series regular Andy Kaufman in his obnoxious "Tony Clifton" alter ego, but according to legend, "Tony" was so disruptive during rehearsal that he had to be literally dragged off the set. (We'll take their word for it when the other cast members insist they weren't in on Kaufman's joke.) ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Taxi: High School Reunion Louie (Danny DeVito) is nervous about attending his 20th high-school reunion -- especially since the last time he saw his classmates they had pulled a prank that made him look like a fool. Hoping to "get even" by showing that he turned out better than expected, Louie coerces good-looking, personable Bobby (Jeff Conaway) to attend the reunion in his place. Although aspiring actor Bobby welcomes the "challenge" of impersonating Louie, in the end, it is the real Mr. DePalma who settles accounts with his former high-school nemesis -- or at least that's what he tells himself. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Taxi: One-Punch Banta Hired as a sparring partner for champion Carlos Navarone (played by real-life WBC welterweight champ Carlos Palomino), Tony (Jeff Conaway) is amazed when he decks Navarone with a single blow. Armed with a surfeit of confidence, Tony eagerly looks forward to a big-time boxing match -- until he discovers that his K.O. of Carlos was only a publicity scam. Watch for the real punch (as opposed to a "stage" punch) delivered by one boxer to another in the final locker-room scene. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Taxi: The Great Line Shy Bobby (Randall Carver) conspires with self-assured Tony (Tony Danza) to come up with a sure-fire "line" for picking up chicks. At Mario's Restaurant, the nervous John finally gets up the gumption to approach a girl and deliver his can't-fail line: "Let's skip the preliminaries -- let's get married." The strategy works a bit too well: the next morning, John finds himself with a brand-new wife and a nonplussed set of in-laws. Ellen Regan makes her first series appearance as Suzanne. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Taxi: Mama Gravas When Latka (Andy Kaufman) announces that his mother is coming from the Old Country to pay him a visit, the cabbies expect to meet a shy, wizened old lady. But Greta Gravas (Susan Kellerman) turns out to be a busty, Junoesque blonde with an insatiable appetite for food...among other things. Catching Greta in the act of "nik-nik" with Alex (Judd Hirsch), an outraged Latka demands that Alex make an honest woman of his mother by marrying her. But can an "ancient custom" save both Greta's honor and Alex' bachelorhood? ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Taxi: Elaine and the Lame Duck Future Larry Sanders Show and Arrested Development co-star Jeffrey Tambor appears in this episode as self-pitying congressman Walter Griswold (Jeffrey Tambor). Convinced that he is now, always has been, and always will be a loser with the ladies, Griswold evokes the sympathy of cabbie Alex (Judd Hirsch). Hoping to boost Griswold's confidence, Alex arranges a date between the congressman and Elaine (Marilu Henner) -- and if Elaine can't make a man feel better about himself, NO one can! ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Taxi: Substitute Father In the last episode of Taxi's first season, Michael Herschewe appears as Elaine's son Jason, a role later played on a semi-regular basis by David Mendenhall. Obliged to leave town for a while, Elaine (Marilu Henner) leaves Jason in the care of Alex (Judd Hirsch) -- and when he proves unavailable, the rest of the cabbies volunteer their services. So taken are the guys by Jason that they can't spend enough time with him. As a result, the boy is unable to study for an upcoming spelling bee, leading to a hectic cramming session and a surprising finale. Marilu Henner's real-life niece Suzanne Carney appears as one of the spelling-bee contestants...a girl named Marilu. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Taxi: Alex Tastes Death and Finds a Nice Restaurant Alex (Judd Hirsch) barely escapes death -- and the loss of an ear -- when a mugger takes a shot at him. After this brush with mortality, Alex decides it is high time to quit his job and change his life. This he does by landing a cushy job at a French restaurant. And it just might have worked too, if it hadn't been for those meddling kids (Oops, that's a Scooby-Doo line. Let's try again). And it just might have worked too if the rest of Sunshine Cab Company hadn't converged upon the restaurant all at once. (That's better!) ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Taxi: Friends Obliged to go out of town for a state middleweight championship, Tony (Tony Danza) entrusts the care of his beloved goldfish to his best friend, Bobby (Jeff Conaway). Alas, the self-involved Bobby neglects his responsibility, and before long Tony's pets are "sleeping with the fishes." The inconsolable Tony breaks off his friendship with Bobby, whose ham-handed efforts to make amends succeed only in making a bad situation worse -- or do they? ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Taxi: Louie Sees the Light Can it be that nasty Louie (Danny DeVito) is on the verge of reformation? Nervous about an upcoming gallstone operation, Louie promises god that he will mend his ways if he pulls through. The operation is a success, and Louie is as good as his word -- or so it seems. Before long, the skeptical cabbies are placing bets as to how long it will be before Louie reverts to his old obnoxious self...and with real money involved, they're determined to goad the little weasel to the breaking point. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Taxi: Sugar Mama Oscar-winning actress Ruth Gordon earned an Emmy award for her work in this episode. Gordon is cast as septuagenarian Dee Wilcox, a freewheeling millionairess who is in the habit of hiring cab drivers for the night and lavishing huge sums of money on them -- no strings attached. Dee is so enchanted by cabbie Alex (Judd Hirsch) that she offers him a job as her permanent chauffeur -- but Alex begins to wonder if the effusively generous Dee wants something more than simply the pleasure of his company. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Taxi: Bobby's Big Break This Taxi episode was originally seen on Thursday instead of the series' usual first-season Tuesday night slot. After years of disappointments and setbacks, aspiring actor Bobby (Jeff Conaway) finally lands a good role in the TV daytime drama "For Better or for Worse." Bent upon burning his bridges behind him, Bobby not only quits his job as a cabbie but also ceremoniously tears up his cab driver's license in the face of despicable dispatcher Louie (Danny DeVito). But when he shows up for work on the set of "For Better or for Worse," Bobby learns that his act of hubris may have been a wee bit too hasty...Michelle Conaway, sister of series regular Jeff Conaway, appears in a supporting part. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Taxi: Hollywood Calling After two months' worth of reruns, Taxi closed out its first season with two "new" episodes. This one features Martin Mull as Hollywood producer Roger Chapman, who shows up in the garage with plans to make a documentary about a day in the life of a "typical" cabbie. Naturally, aspiring actor Bobby (Jeff Conaway) assumes he will be tapped for the leading role, but Bobby had reckoned without the show-biz ambitions of his fellow cabbies -- except for Alex (Judd Hirsch), who struggles manfully to remain aloof to the excitement, and Louie (Danny DeVito), who has already wangled a huge amount of money from Chapman to act as "production coordinator." As it happens, however, everybody ends up in "development hell." ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Taxi: Jim Gets a Pet Despite being warned by Alex (Judd Hirsch) of the evils of gambling, Jim (Christopher Lloyd) becomes fascinated with horse racing -- and betting on the horses being raced. The result: Jim wins a huge amount of money at the track...and also buys a race horse, whom he names "Gary." The fun begins when Jim tries to sneak his new "pet" into his hovel of an apartment, in preparation for setting the nag free in Central Park. But "fun" is hardly the word when the other cabbies make an unexpected visit to Jim's place. ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Nardo Loses Her Marbles Stressed out from juggling her job as a cabbie with her responsibilities as a single mother and her burgeoning art-curator career, poor Elaine (Marilu Henner) finally snaps during a major art-gallery event. Reliable old Alex (Judd Hirsch) offers to drive Elaine home and help her calm down -- a gesture which Elaine apparently misinterprets as an invitation to have sex. But it is only after Elaine agrees to undergo therapy that Alex allows any thoughts of romance to dance in his own head. Cult-film favorite Mary Woronov (Eating Raoul) guest stars as an avant-garde artist, while future Star Trek: Voyager regular Robert Picardo also makes an appearance. ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: The Great Race The garage becomes a unofficial gambling emporium when the cabbies place bets as to whether Alex (Judd Hirsch) can bring in more fare money than Louie (Danny DeVito) during a single night, or vice versa. Elaine (Marilu Henner) is particularly anxious over the outcome of this wager, especially since she has promised to go on a date with Louie if he wins. Naturally, Louie is not above cheating and duplicity to emerge victorious--and for a while, it looks as though the "good guys" aren't going to come out on top in this venture. ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Elaine's Secret Admirer Having just broken up a relationship, Elaine (Marilu Henner) is unusually receptive to the unsigned love notes being sent to her by an unknown admirer. Can it be that Elaine's mystery man is Don Reavy (Michael de Lano), the handsome new driver in the Sunshine garage? Whatever the case, Elaine and Don begin dating...and it is then that the real author of the love notes makes himself known -- but only to Alex (Judd Hirsch). ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Louie and the Nice Girl Season two of Taxi gets under way with an Emmy-winning episode that teams series star Danny DeVito (Louie DePalma) with his real-life significant other Rhea Perlman. The cabbies are amazed when Zena Sherman (Perlman), the soft-spoken woman who stocks the vending machines at the garage, confesses to have a crush on the eminently unlovable Louie. Believing that Zena is too timid to admit this, Alex (Judd Hirsch) agrees to act as matchmaker. Alex comes to regret this act of kindness when, after a few dates, Louie boastfully and obnoxiously claims to have "scored" innumerable times with Zena. The truth turns out to be a lot more suprising -- especially to Louie! ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Wherefore Art Thou, Bobby? The latest in a long line of setbacks in his acting career befalls poor Bobby (Jeff Conaway). What is especially galling is that the actor who beats Bobby out for the lead in an off-Broadway production of Romeo and Juliet is his new friend Steve (Michael Horton) -- to whom Bobby has been giving acting lessons! Completely frustrated, Bobby vows to give up the theatrical world and remain a cabbie for the rest of his life...or at least that was his plan until Louie (Danny DeVito) opened his big, annoying mouth. ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Reverend Jim: A Space Odyssey With this episode, Christopher Lloyd becomes a regular in the role of zonked-out hippie minister Reverend Jim. Running into Jim for the first time since he presided over Latka's faux, first-season wedding, the cabbies compassionately decide to pull the dusty derelict off the street and install him as the garage's newest driver. Characteristically, nasty Louie (Danny DeVito) wants no part of Jim, but changes his mind with a little help from some "really good-tasting" coffee. But will Jim, who apparently hasn't had a cogent thought since the late 1960s, be able to pass his driver's exam? ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: The Apartment When Latka (Andy Kaufman) is evicted from his apartment, Alex (Judd Hirsch) offers to help him find a new place. Even so, Latka locates the perfect place on his own: a luxurious apartment that is ideally suited to his intended lifestyle. Unfortunately, there was a language breakdown during the rent negotiations -- and thus Latka finds that he must cough up 3000 dollars per month. The other cabbies try to bail Latka out by sharing his new apartment and the expenses for the first month...with the usual unexpected results. Dick Butkus of the Chicago Bears makes a brief guest appearance. ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Latka's Revolting The cabbies are shocked to learn that mild-mannered Latka (Andy Kaufman) was a rebel general in his own country -- and Latka is even more shocked to learn that the long-awaited rebellion has broken out, and he is expected to return to his homeland. During a farewell party for Latka, Elaine (Marilu Henner) asks his second-in-command, Baschi (Lenny Baker), to draw a map of the battlefield so she will have a better understanding of what Latka is in for. As it turns out, the map reveals a whole lot more than anyone expected. Best bit: The "National Anthem," which is obviously being ad-libbed on the spot by Andy Kaufman and Lenny Baker. ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: The Lighter Side of Angela Matusa Suzanne Kent returns in the role of Angela Matusa, the extremely overweight girl with whom Alex (Judd Hirsch) went out on a blind date in the first-season episode of the same name. When Alex meets Angela after a year's separation, he is amazed to discover that she has shed 100 pounds. Angela would now like to parlay her friendship with Alex into a full-blown romance. Alex isn't so keen on this, but he doesn't want to disappoint Angela to the point that she gives up her diet. The apparent solution to the dilemma arrives in a most unlikely form -- or so Alex thinks until Angela lets him in on a bit of new and surprising information. ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: The Reluctant Fighter Marc Anthony Danza, real-life son of Taxi co-star Tony Danza (Tony Banta), is cast in this episode as Brian Sims, an invalid child in need of a kidney operation. When Tony is slated to be the opponent of former boxing champ Benny Foster (Armando Muniz) in the latter's comeback attempt, Tony is thrilled at the prospect of finally making his mark in the pugilistic world. But when it turns out that Benny is idolized by the ailing Brian Sims and that Benny is returning to the ring for the boy's sake, Tony worries that if he wins the big bout, little Brian will ultimately emerge the loser -- big time. ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Louie Meets the Folks The normally outspoken and abrasive Louie (Danny DeVito) is cowed into silence (or at least, near-silence) at the prospect of meeting the parents of his girlfriend, Zena (Rhea Perlman). When time comes for Louie and Zena to go out to dinner with her folks, Louie slips a few bucks to Alex (Judd Hirsch) so that he will accompany him to the get-together -- and keep him from inserting his foot in his mouth. Not surprisingly, Louie manages to make an ass of himself anyway...but Zena's minister father (John C. Becher) does not react to this social disaster in the anticipated manner. ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Alex's Romance Dee Wallace Stone makes a return appearance as soap-opera actress Joyce Rogers, a character introduced in the first-season episode "Bobby's Big Break." Proving to be a shoulder to cry on when Joyce is overcome with her insecurities, Alex (Judd Hirsch) somewhat unexpectedly falls in love with her. The test of their relationship arrives when Joyce is offered a fantastic career opportunity -- one that will compel her to move to Los Angeles. ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: A Woman Between Friends A mutual attraction for an attractive girl named Janet (Constance Forslund) puts a severe strain on the friendship between Tony (Tony Danza) and Bobby (Jeff Conaway). Alex (Judd Hirsch) rushes in to mediate when the animosity between the two former pals threatens to erupt into violence. The outcome of this crisis boils down to a crucial decision made by Janet -- or rather, the equally crucial decision made before Janet's decision by the other two "points" of the triangle. ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Honor Thy Father Alex (Judd Hirsch) is surprisingly unaffected when his sister Charlotte (Joan Hackett) shows up with the news that their father, Joe, has suffered a near-fatal heart attack. It soon develops that Alex has never forgiven Joe for running out on his family years earlier. But when he shows up in the hospital, Alex is overcome with emotion and sobbingly expresses his love for his ailing dad. But there's another surprise in store for all concerned -- and without giving the game away, it should be noted that Jack Gilford is cast in the role of "Joe Reiger." ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Alex Jumps Out of an Airplane After an exciting ski trip during which he managed to overcome several long-standing fears, Alex (Judd Hirsch) has vowed to confront and conquer all of his personal demons. In quick order, he sings in public for the first time, goes a few rounds in the boxing ring, and prepares to go skydiving. As the plane climbs into the upper regions, however, Alex begins to have second thoughts about casting off the shackles of terror -- but it may be too late for him to back out now. ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Art Work Elaine (Marilu Henner) has come up with a seemingly foolproof plan to solve her fellow cabbies' financial woes. She has received inside informatioin about an art auction involving the paintings of an artist who is not long for this world. Once the artist dies, the paintings' value will skyrocket. All her friends have to do is bid on the paintings before the artist's expiration -- and all they need is a mere 2000 to do this! Onetime 20th Century-Fox leading man Richard Derr and former Western heroine (Peggy Stewart) appear in cameo roles. ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Fantasy Borough, Part 1 In part one of Taxi's two-part, second-season finale, Fantasy Island co-star Herve Villechaize (playing himself) leaves a package of publicity photos in Tony's cab. This inspires Tony (Tony Danza) and the other drivers to discuss their own personal fantasies -- and as usual, these are not only surprising, but hilarious. Highlights include Latka (Andy Kaufman) taking over the dispatcher's job from Louie (Danny DeVito), and Tony discussing politics with CBS newsman Eric Sevareid (also playing himself). ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Shut it Down, Part 1 In the first episode of a two-part story, the cabbies are up in arms over the Sunshine Taxi Company's refusal to provide sufficient funds for proper upkeep of their cabs -- especially after Tony's brakes fail at a crucial moment. Organizing into an ad-hoc union, the gang appoints Elaine (Marilu Henner) as its shop steward -- and after an unsuccessful meeting with management, she leads the other cabbies on a strike. As it turns out, however, the lack of maintenance money is not due entirely to negligence, but is largely the handiwork of a certain book-juggling dispatcher named Louie (Danny DeVito). ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Elaine's Strange Triangle Forever unlucky in love, Elaine (Marilu Henner) hopes that her current boyfriend, Kirk (John David Cameron), will work out. Typically, however, Kirk does not want to make a commitment because he has eyes for someone else. Less typically, that "someone else" turns out to be Elaine's male co-worker Tony Banta (Tony Danza)! All this leads to riotous conclusion at a gay bar where Tony's adamantly straight buddy Alex (Judd Hirsch) finds himself the center of attention. This episode won an Emmy Award for director James Burrows. ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Going Home A private detective (played by Dick Yarmy, brother of comedian Don Adams) shows up at the garage in search of one of the cabbies: burned-out hippie minister Jim Ignatowski (Christopher Lloyd). It seems that the detective has been dispatched by Jim's wealthy father (Victor Buono) -- whose name, by the way, is not and never has been Ignatowski -- to bring him back to Boston. As the proverbial black sheep of his family, Jim looks forward to the "reconciliation" with fear and loathing...but there are few surprises in store for all concerned. ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Fathers of the Bride Talia Balsam, who appeared as the daughter of cabbie Alex Rieger (Judd Hirsch) in the very first episode of Taxi, reprises the role in this third-season entry. While perusing the social notes in the newspaper, Alex discovers that his daughter Cathy is about to be married. Despite the fact that he has not been invited, Alex plans to attend the ceremony anyway and to bring his co-worker Elaine (Marilu Henner) with him -- a move calculated to make Alex's ex-wife feel as miserable as he does. Louise Lasser (Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman) makes her first series appearance as Alex's neurotic former spouse Phyllis. ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Tony's Sister and Jim Former Rhoda co-star (and future voice of Marge Simpson) Julie Kavner guest stars as Monica, the nutty, recently divorced sister of cab driver Tony Banta (Tony Danza). Hoping to create the proverbial Match Made in Heaven, Tony tries to play cupid between Monica and his fellow cabbie Alex (Judd Hirsch). Unfortunately, the ditsy girl is only interested in burned-out hippie "Reverend" Jim (Christopher Lloyd). This episode earned an Emmy Award for writer Michael Leeson. ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Louie's Rival Rhea Perlman, future wife of series regular Danny DeVito, reprises her characterization of Zena Sherman as Taxi begins its third season. Louie DePalma (DeVito), ever-abrasive dispatcher for the Sunshine Cab Company, is even more obnoxious than usual, and for good reason: his girlfriend Zena has dumped him for Dwight (Richard Michenberg), the bartender at Mario's. Will Louie be able to steal his sweetie back, or will he need the assistance of the Sunshine cabbies (specifically, the garage's resident "father confessor" Alex [Judd Hirsch])? ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Guess Who's Coming for Brefnish Carol Kane makes her first series appearance as Simka Dahblitz, a woman from the same unpronounceable foreign country as Latka Gravas (Andy Kaufman). The growing affection between Latka and Simka reaches an impasses when he discovers that she is a member of a socially inferior class: that is, she is one of the Mountain Persons. Will true love prevail over class consciousness, or will the shamefaced Latka lose Simka to another man? Listen to the "foreign language" bandied about by Andy Kaufman and Carol Kane; it is a tongue of their own invention, extensively improvised during rehearsals for this episode. ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Shut it Down, Part 2 In the conclusion of a two-part story, the cabbies have gone on strike, with "shop steward" Elaine (Marilu Henner) leading the job action. Hoping to settle the dispute, Elaine has reluctantly agrees to date with the representative of Management -- namely, the repulsive Louie (Danny DeVito). Even after the strike has ended, Elaine must go through with her rendezvous with Louie, and to ease the pain she fortifies herself with booze and sedatives. Sensing that Elaine is none too thrilled with their night out, Louie tries real, real hard to be on his best behavior -- a task that, of course, proves absolutely impossible. ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Tony and Brian In this follow-up to the previous episode, "The Reluctant Fighter," Tony (Tony Danza) has become close friends with nine-year-old Brian Sims (played by Danza's real-life son Marc Anthony Danza), who has apparently recovered his health. Hoping to adopt the orphaned Brian, Tony is crushed to learn that the youngster would rather live with a wealthy couple, the Brennans (Michael Fairman, Barbara Stuart). Things take an unexpected turn when Mr. and Mrs. Brennan choose to remain childless -- at least so far as Brian is concerned. ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Fantasy Borough, Part 2 In the conclusion of a two-part story, the cabbies continue to discuss their personal fantasies, inspired by a package of alluring publicity photos left in Tony's cab by Fantasy Island co-star Herve Villechaize. Unfortunately, reality interferes when Alex (Judd Hirsch) fantasizes about taking a beautiful passenger to his own apartment. But Louie (Danny DeVito) doesn't let reality get in his way as he dreams about wedded bliss with his dream girl, Elaine (Marilu Henner) -- whose own fantasy segues into an out-of-left-field musical production number! This was the final episode of Taxi's second season. ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: What Price Bobby? Aspiring actor Bobby (Jeff Conaway) thinks he has it made when a top female theatrical agent (Susan Sullivan) agrees to represent him. Bobby also thinks that the agent is enchanted by his talent. Silly boy! The agent is more interested in a sexual relationship with our hero, proving beyond doubt that the "casting couch" concept knows no gender barriers. The problem: can Bobby break off the affair without jeopardizing his career? ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Mr. Personalities Comedian Andy Kaufman, who made a career of assuming "alternate personalities" that he claimed to be unable to control, delivers an acting tour-de-force in this episode. Ever since he adopted the obnoxious alter ego of swingin' bachelor Vic Ferrari in the previous season's "Latka the Playboy," mild-mannered mechanic Latka Gravas (Andy Kaufman) can never tell when he himself will "disappear" and Vic will emerge. Making matters worse, Latka has adopted several other personalities -- his latest being a carbon copy of fellow cabbie Alex (Judd Hirsch)! Clearly, a visit to the shrink is long overdue...and that is where special guest star Barry Nelson comes in. ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Fledgling In her capacity as a part-time art curator, Elaine (Marilu Henner) makes the acquaintance of Craig Egan (Paul Sand), a brilliant painter--and a severe agoraphobic. Hoping to coax Craig out of the "safety" of his apartment and into the world at large, Elaine offers to introduce him to her friends at Sunshine Cab. An excellent idea...except that once he has arrived at the garage, Craig is too terrified to get out of the cab that brought him. This episode was orginally produced for Taxi's third season, but held over until season four. ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Like Father, Like Son Jack Gilford returns in the role of Joe Rieger, estranged father of cab driver Alex (Judd Hirsch). Much against his better judgment, Alex agrees to meet Joe for lunch at Mario's (the cabbie's favorite hangout), whereupon dear old dad tries to push his son into a date with a stranger named Karen (Barbara Babcock). At first gratified by his father's gesture, Alex is ultimately disillusioned when jaunty Joe tries to make time with Karen himself! ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: The Ten Percent Solution Aspiring actor Bobby (Jeff Conaway) is persuaded that his fellow cabbie, would-be boxing champ Tony Banta (Tony Danza), would be a "natural" for a theatrical career. As a result, Tony shows up at an audition trading dialogue instead of punches. Ultimately, Bobby comes to regret his "discovery" of Tony -- especially when the uniquely untalented pugilist seems poised to become a bona fide movie star. Series producer Ed Weinberger appears in the role of Jerry Lowell. ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Bobby and the Critic Incensed over the bad theatrical reviews doled out by critic John Bowman (John Harkins), Bobby (Jeff Conaway) writes a scathing letter to Bowman's newspaper -- then decides that it wouldn't be prudent to mail the missive. But Louie (Danny DeVito) finds the letter and ships it off to Bowman, leading to a citywide "cause celebre" in which dozens of frustrated actors rally around Bobby as their hero. All well and good -- until Bowman shows up to review Bobby's one-man show. ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Zen and the Art of Cab Driving The cabbies are astonished when Jim (Christopher Lloyd), a burned-out relic of the 1960s whose appearance and lifestyle can be charitably described as "unkempt" abruptly turns over a new leaf. Virtually overnight, Jim has brought perfection, order, and expensive creature comforts into his life--and he's even begun to take baths and change his clothes. The reason? Well, it seems that Jim had earlier picked up a couple of passengers who were discussing the "secret of success." Future Miami Vice producer Michael Mann also appears in a supporting role. ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Vienna Waits The growing attraction between cabbies Alex (Judd Hirsch) and Elaine (Marilu Henner) is further explored in this episode. When Elaine accompanies Alex on a vacation to Europe, Alex is worried that she will feel lonely and neglected while he wines and dines a variety of sexy foreign damsels. But as it turns out, it is Elaine who is the toast of the Continent, while Alex remains alone and ignored...at least until Elaine takes a special kind of pity on him. Originally intended as the opening episode of Taxi's fourth season, "Vienna Waits" was shown second after "Jim the Psychic." ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Latka's Cookies Cookie entrepreneur Wally "Famous" Amos appears as himself in this episode, wherein immigrant mechanic Latka Gravas (Andy Kaufman) learns a few hard lessons about the American capitalist system. Using a special recipe handed down by his dear departed grandmother, Latka hopes to market his family's traditional cookies and make a fortune. Alas, one of the recipe's main ingredients is what can be euphemistically described as a "controlled substance" -- and it looks like Latka's business venture will land him in the slammer. This episode was originally slated to air on January 28, 1981. ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Call of the Mild Hoping to escape from the pressures of city life in general and their jobs in particular, all of the cabbies except for Elaine (Marilu Henner) head to the mountains for a weekend getaway. At first, all seems cozy in their isolated cabin, but tranquility quickly segues into terror as the Taxi gang realizes how ill-equipped they are for survival in the wilderness. A missing guide, a total lack of electricity, a blinding snowstorm, and a "eulogy" for a turkey are essential ingredients to the action. ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Louie Goes Too Far Ever since she became a cabbie, Elaine (Marilu Henner) has been forced to fend off the verbal insinuations of lecherous dispatcher Louie DePalma (Danny DeVito). But when Louie spies on Elaine while she's in the ladies' room it is the last straw. In a fully justifiable feminist huff, Elaine reports Louie to his superiors and gets him fired -- thus setting the stage for a hilarious denouement in which the frenzied Mr. DePalma literally falls to his knobby knees to beg Elaine's forgiveness. ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Jim the Psychic With six Emmy awards under its belt for the previous season's output, Taxi launches season four with an episode built around the character of burned-out hippie minister Jim Ignatowski (Christopher Lloyd). The drivers of the Sunshine Cab company are amazed when several of Jim's "psychic" dreams start coming true. Only Alex (Judd Hirsch) seems to be blasé about Jim's prognostocations -- even when his own death is predicted! The climax of the episode is a slapstick soufflé of dancing girls, baseball equipment, and a mysterious (and very short!) stranger. ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Louie Bumps Into an Old Lady Lecherous Louie (Danny DeVito) is practically salivating over the prospect of going on a training drive with a pretty young cabbie named Janine (Lane Brody). Alas, Louie spends so much time staring at the girl that he fails to keep his eyes on the road--and before long, the cab has run into a little old lady (Iris Korn). The upshot of all this is a million-dollar lawsuit, a court date for Louie, and a hilariously misbegotten attempt to prove that the old lady is faking her injuries. ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Jim Joins the Network In this follow-up to the fourth season Taxi opener "Jim the Psychic", disheveled ex-hippie Jim (Christopher Lloyd) continues to amaze his fellow cabbies with his uncannily accurate predictions. Clearly, there is only one job for which Jim is uniquely qualified: that of program scheduler at a major TV network. Martin Short guest stars as Mitch Harris, the network executive who hopes that Jim's prognostications about future TV ratings will mean money in the bank for Harris' bosses. ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: The Costume Party A briefcase left in the back of Bobby's (Jeff Conaway) cab yields an invitation list for a lavish yacht party. Every name on the list is that of a famous celebrity -- and of even more significance, the party is a costume ball. Seizing the opportunity, the cabbies don disguises and masks and pass themselves off as the "beautiful people" who have been invited to the bash. Unfortunately, just having a famous name doesn't automatically make one famous, as our too-eager party crashers learn to their dismay. ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Louie's Mother Julia DeVito, real-life mother of series regular Danny DeVito, appears in this episode as the mother of obnoxious taxi dispatcher Louie DePalma (played by -- who else? -- Danny DeVito). More garrulous than usual, Louie has been driving the cabbies crazy trying to convince them that it was the "right thing" to see his mother off to a nursing home. There is one person, however, who can never be convinced of this: Louie, himself feels guilty that mom stormed out of the DePalma apartment after a vicious argument. ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: On the Job, Part 1 In the first episode of a two-part story, the Sunshine Cab Company goes out of business forcing the cabbies to seek employment elsewhere. One month later, Sunshine is up and running again, and the drivers get together to recount their experiences in their new (and very temporary) "outside" jobs. Highlights of this episode include Tony's (Tony Danza) brief and involuntary career as a collector for a bookie, Elaine's (Marilu Henner) misadventures in the secretarial pool, and Jim's (Christopher Lloyd) perambulations as a door-to-door salesman -- without even knowing what it is that he's selling. ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Louie's Mom Remarries Julia DeVito, real-life mother of Taxi co-star Danny DeVito, makes a return appearance as the mother of DeVito's series character, abrasive taxi dispatcher Louie DePalma. Characteristically, Louie is furious that his mom plans to get married again, and to a man who isn't even Italian. In fact, Mrs. DePalma's new fiancé is a Japanese gentleman (Jerry Fujikawa) -- and when she announces her intention to move to Japan herself, the cabbies practically have to scrape the outraged Louie off the ceiling! ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: On the Job, Part 2 In the conclusion of a two-part story, the cabbies gather together to recall their misadventures in the job pool during the month that the Sunshine Cab Company was shut down. Aspiring actor Bobby (Jeff Conaway) explains how his stint as an Easter Bunny at a children's party ended in disaster, while Alex (Judd Hirsch) ruminates over the strange things that boredom can do to the mind of a night watchman. But while his co-workers are relating stories of failure, Louie (Danny DeVito) insists that he was a huge success during his brief tenure on Wall Street -- and it turns out that he's telling the truth! ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Thy Boss's Wife When cab company owner Mr. McKenzie (Stephen Elliott) and his wife (Eileen Brennan) have a violent argument at the garage, Louie sharkishly tells the cabbies than whenever this occurs, Mrs. McKenzie consoles herself by having an affair with the company's handsomest driver -- who of course is then promptly fired. Imagine Louie's surprise when Mrs. McKenzie bypasses the other workers and comes on to him. Terrified that he will lose his job, Louie tries to palm Mrs. McKenzie off on Tony (Tony Danza) -- but he's not out of the woods (or the boudoir) yet! This episode was orginally slated to air on January 14, 1981, then was moved to February 5 before finally premiering one week later. ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Of Mice and Tony Having endured one too many hard knocks in the boxing ring, eTony Banta (Tony Danza) has elected to hang up his gloves and become a trainer. Spotting a young fighter named Terry Carver (Ernie Hudson), Tony immediately senses that the kid has potential. He then offers to become Terry's manager...and that's when the trouble starts. The highlight of this episode is Tony's one-on-one with the "Syndicate" (whose members include Taxi scriptwriters Howard Gewirtz and Ian Praiser). ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Out of Commission For years, Tony Banta (Tony Danza) has driven a cab to finance his dream -- that of being a champion boxer. Also, for years Tony has spent more time flat on his back than in the center of the ring. Now, the time has come for Tony to give up his dream -- or at least, that is the conclusion of his friends, his doctor, and the boxing commission. Will Tony listen to this advice, or will his pride score a knockout over common sense? ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Bobby's Roommate Elaine (Marilu Henner) has nowhere to go when she is forced out of her apartment. Well, almost nowhere: Fellow cabbie and erstwhile Bobby (Jeff Conaway) generously invites Elaine to live in his place while he is on tour with a road show. Things get a bit ticklish when, thanks to a professional indiscretion, Bobby returns home earlier than expected, and Bobby comes home -- with Elaine still installed as his "roommate." What follows is a comedy of errors and misunderstandings that would put a French farce to shame. ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Elaine's Old Friend Unwilling to admit to her old-school chum Mary (Martha Smith) that she is merely a cab driver -- and an unattached one at that -- Elaine (Marilu Henner) spins a tall tale about her "wonderful" job and her "dream" boyfriend, a professor at Columbia University. Inasmuch as no such boyfriend exists, Alex (Judd Hirsch) is pressed into service to pose as the imaginary beau. The deception comes off well -- perhaps too well -- but can Alex and Elaine build a genuine relationship on a mountain of lies? ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Louie's Fling Series star Danny DeVito's real-life significant other Rhea Perlman repireses her role as Zena Sherman, off-and-on girlfriend of DeVito's Taxi character Louie DePalma. As a favor to Zena, Louie agrees to act as escort to her friend Emily (Andrea Marcovicci), whose despondency over a busted romance has resulted in an over-dependence upon booze and other substances. One thing leads to another, and by the end of the evening Emily and Louie are an "item." Zena's outrage over being two-timed is nothing compared to the climactic confrontation between a tearful Louie and a "helpful" Alex (Judd Hirsch). ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Latka the Playboy Mild-mannered immigrant mechanic Latka Gravas (Andy Kaufman) is frustrated by his lack of success with women. Hoping to improve his social life, Latka locks himself up for several weeks of intense "study," using as his study guides a collection of English-language tapes and several back issues of Playboy magazine. When he emerges, Latka has assumed a new and radically different personality: That of a swinging, womanizing lounge lizard named Vince Ferrari. It has now become part of showbiz folklore that the mercurial Andy Kaufman remained obnoxiously "in character" as Latka's alter ego throughout the filming of this episode, even insisting that the series' producers sign "Vince Ferrari" to a separate contract! "Latka the Playboy" was the final episode of Taxi's third season. ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Scenskees from a Marriage, Part 1 In this first episode of a two-part story, a severe strain is placed upon the marriage of Latka (Andy Kaufman) and Simka (Carol Kane). It seems that, during a heavy winter storm, Latka is trapped in a cab with attractive female driver Cindy (Allyce Beasley). And when wife Simka (Carol Kane) discovers how her husband and his companion (who assumed that they would not survive the night) managed to "keep warm," Latka finds himself out in the cold. How can this marriage be saved? Well, it seems that there's this curious custom from the "old country"... ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Tony's Lady To pick up extra money, cab driver Tony (Tony Danza) hires himself out as a chauffeur for a wealthy woman named Christina (Rebecca Holden). Perhaps it goes without saying that Tony becomes enamored of his attractive new boss, and it is equally unnecessary to add that this romance is not going to be smooth sailing by any means, especially since Tony is too shy to let Christina know how he feels about her. ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Elegant Iggy Elaine (Marilu Henner) is convinced that an invitation to a fashionable art-society party is her ticket to success in the art world. But she is not so certain that burned-out hippie Jim "Iggy" Ignatowski (Christopher Lloyd) is the right person to escort her to the party. Alas, just as Elaine has feared, Jim's anti-social behavior threatens to mess up everything. But a hitherto untapped musical talent saves the day for everyone...sort of. This episode won an Emmy Award for writer Ken Estin. ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Crime and Punishment Allen Garfield (billed as Alan Goorwitz) guest stars as Mr. Rutledge, the owner of the Sunshine Cab Company. Upon learning that someone in the garage is stealing spare auto parts, he demands that the guilty party step forward. Since that party is light-fingered dispatcher Louie (Danny DeVito), who lacks the guts to own up to his own misdeeds, there is but one way out: Louie persuades assistant dispatcher Jeff (Thom Koutsoukos) to take the rap -- with jaw-dropping results. ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: I Wanna Be Around One wonders where Louie (Danny DeVito) was during the great "nuclear scare" of the 1960s, since it is only now that his fears have been aroused by watching a Phil Donahue Show interview about the bomb. No matter -- Louie has determined to be a "survivalist" prepared to face any manner of holocaust, natural or man-made. To that end, our "hero" transforms the Sunshine Cab Company garage into his own personal bomb shelter and has dragooned driver Tony (Tony Danza) and assistant dispatcher Jeff (Jeff Thomas) into being his "survival squad." And, oh yes, Elaine (Marilu Henner) is expected to hang around too -- but not because of her self-preservation skills. ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Travels with My Dad Tony (Tony Danza) is apprehensive about his upcoming reunion with his father Angie (Donnelly Rhodes), a merchant seaman who was largely absent while his son was growing up; however, the meeting goes off quite well. In fact, Angie has magnanimously arranged for Tony to take a job aboard his ship, which is bound for Singapore. While Tony certainly could use a scenery change, is he prepared to forsake his friends and his lifestyle for the "call of the sea?" Cult-film favorite Dick Miller appears as Fergie. ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Tony's Comeback It has been several months since Tony Banta (Tony Danza) gave up his boxing career, and though he still feels unfulfilled, he is resigned to his decision. All this changes when Tony is apprised of a gallant comeback attempt by former football pro Lucius Franklin (played by genuine NFL veteran Bubba Smith). Inspired, Tony sets about to renew his boxer's license...and one trembles, wondering if Tony is setting himself up for yet another (painful) fall. ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Get Me Through the Holidays Louise Lasser makes a return appearance as Phyllis, the ex-wife of cabbie Alex Rieger (Judd Hirsch). Once again, Phyllis is lonely and miserable, and once again she turns to Alex for comfort and solace. This time, Phyllis' depression coincides with the Christmas season -- but even allowing for the spirit of "goodwill to men" (or women), will the taciturn Alex soften up and invite Phyllis to spend the holidays with him? As it turns out, Phyllis' "Christmas Present" is just what Alex has always wanted (but that doesn't mean there are any sentimental strings attached whatsoever!). ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Cooking for Two The pig-sty apartment that Jim (Christopher Lloyd) calls home is demolished by a wrecking ball. With no place else to go, Jim decides to move in with Louie (Danny DeVito), whom he regards with something short of accuracy as his "best buddy." This oddest of odd couples provokes a great deal of amusement amongst the cabbies, but things soon take a less than amusing turn when Jim attempts to make dinner -- and burns the apartment to a crisp. ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Zena's Honeymoon Rhea Perlman, real-life wife of Taxi co-star Danny DeVito, returns to the role of Zena Sherman. No one is more surprised -- or dismayed -- than Louie DePalma (DeVito) when his erstwhile girlfriend Zena shows up at the garage to announced that she is marrying someone else, especially since he'd convinced himself that she'd come crawling back to him after their last breakup. Never comfortable when swallowing pride or eating crow, Louie does not know how to react to this blow -- and there is worse in store! ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Elaine and the Monk Former Fridays regular Mark Blankfield guest stars as Zifka, a monk who hails from the same foreign land as Latka (Andy Kaufman) and Simka (Carol Kane). Though bound to a lifelong vow of silence and sacrifice, Zifka is allowed one day every ten years to "cut loose" and indulge in all worldly pleasures.. This leads to an exhilarating night on the town for Zifka and Elaine (Marilu Henner) -- but will this 24-hour period of reckless abandon lead the merry monk to renounce his vows? ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Jim and the Kid Burned-out 1960s relic "Reverend" Jim (Christopher Lloyd) finds himself with a new roommate: A young boy named Terry (Tony LaTorre), who has run away from home. Never mind that Jim's apartment is a hovel and that he himself is one step removed from a babbling lunatic. Terry finds Jim's company infinitely preferable to that of his ultra-strict parents (Rebecca Clemons, Mark Harrison). It takes the combined efforts of Jim's fellow cabbies to convince Terry to meet his folks halfway...and vice versa. ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Nina Loves Alex Charlayne Woodard guest stars as Nina Chambers, the newest driver for the Sunshine Cab company. Instantly attracted to Alex (Judd Hirsch), Nina persuades herself that she is in love with him. There is only one thing preventing them from becoming a couple; Nina is an indefatigable optimist, while Alex is a dictionary illustration of the word "pessimist." Eventually, one of the two has a change of heart...and as usual, it's a few beats too late. ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Alex Goes Off the Wagon This episode reveals something only hinted at in previous seasons: Cabbie Alex Rieger (Judd Hirsch) is a compulsive gambler. Oh, he has managed to hide and suppress his "affliction" for years, but all this changes after an unusually lucky streak at an Atlantic City casino. Now convinced he is the highest of high rollers, and much against the advice of his fellow cabbies -- especially Jim (Christopher Lloyd), who has bankrolled him -- Alex hopes to fatten his wallet in a local dice game. ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Jim's Inheritance The chances of burned-out cabbie Reverend Jim (Christopher Lloyd) passing any sort of competency test is roughly equivalent to a snowball's chance of surviving in hell, but that's just what he must do in this episode. Upon learning that his late father has left him three-and-a-half million dollars in his will -- but with certain very rigid conditions: Jim must prove he is of sound mind, and fast! He must also dress and act like something resembling a normal human being, and for help in this matter he turns to the most "normal" people he knows: Alex (Judd Hirsch)...and Louie (Danny DeVito)? ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Alex the Gofer In need of extra money, Alex (Judd Hirsch) takes a second job as general factotum -- or "gofer" -- for a small theatrical troupe. The company's egotistical producer and director have no qualms about mistreating and humiliating Alex, but he seems to take it in stride; he'd always wanted to work in the theater, and this is his chance. Only when another cabbie alerts Alex to the fact that he's being played for a fool does the worm even consider turning -- thereby setting up the surprising conclusion of this episode. ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Scenskees from a Marriage, Part 2 In the conclusion of a two-part story, a snowstorm has left the marriage between Latka (Andy Kaufman) and Simka (Carol Kane) skating on thin ice. Still smoldering over the events that occurred when Latka and female cabbie Cindy were stuck in the same cab on a cold winter night, Simka wonders if she and her husband can ever patch things up again. There is no alternative but to turn to an old custom from the couple's native country -- which decrees that Simka must sleep with one of Latka's co-workers to even things out! ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: The Wedding of Latka and Simka It is a glorious day for immigrant mechanic Latka Gravas (Andy Kaufman) when no less an authority than Dr. Joyce Brothers (as herself) declares him cured of his multiple-personality syndrome. Now, at long last, Latka can tie the matrimonial knot with his lovely countrywoman, Simka Dahblitz (Carol Kane, repeating her Emmy-winning recurring role). But given the bizarre customs of Latka and Simka's homeland -- not to mention the jaundiced critical eye of Latka's mother (Susan Kellerman) -- will the wedding come off without the usual setbacks attending situation-comedy marriage ceremonies? Familiar character actor Vincent Schiavelli (Ghost) appears as Rev. Gorky. ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Simka Returns Carol Kane won an Emmy Award for her performance in this episode, in which she recreates the role of Simka Dahblitz, countrywoman and erstwhile sweetheart of immigrant mechanic Latka Gravas (Andy Kaufman). Returning to New York, Simka hopes to renew her relationship with Latka, whom she recalls as "simple and sweet." True enough, as far as it goes, but Simka doesn't know about Latka's new alter ego, the obnoxiously aggressive self-styled ladies' man Vic Ferrari (a role for which Andy Kaufman demanded a separate contract from the series' producers -- and got it!). Thus, the episode's main crisis finds Latka vying for Simka's affections...with himself. ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: The Shloogel Show Having made the big move from ABC to NBC, Taxi opens its fifth season with a "Shloogel." And what's a shloogel? Well, it's what newlyweds Latka (Andy Kaufman) and Simka (Carol Kane) call a "group blind date" back in their own country. And it's quite an experience for the folks at the Sunshine Cab Company, as Alex (Judd Hirsch) is paired up with a woman (Carlene Watkins) with whom he'd like to spend the rest of his life (or so he thinks); Tony is teamed with a "dream girl" who proves to be a nightmare (Anne de Salvo); Louie (Danny DeVito) finds out that his blind date (Murphy Cross) is genuinely blind; Elaine (Marilu Henner) is attracted to a gormless nerd (Wallace Shawn); and Reverend Jim (Christopher Lloyd) ends up with actress Marcia Wallace (as herself) -- and celebrates the occasion by singing his own special version of the Bob Newhart Show theme! Although the characters don't know it yet, this episode will prove to have a far-reaching influence on the rest of season five. ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Take My Ex-Wife, Please Louise Lasser reprises her role as Phyllis, ex-wife of cab driver Alex Rieger (Judd Hirsch). Showing up at the garage in hopes of a brief reconciliation, lonely Phyllis finds out that Alex is unavailable -- so she promptly comes on to Louie (Danny DeVito). By the time Alex finds out about this, Louie has revealed a lot more of himself than he planned -- literally so! Also in the cast are twin actresses Randi and Candi Brough, best known for their work in the comedy adventure series B.J. and the Bear. ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Louie's Revenge Andrea Marcovicci returns as Emily, the hard-drinking, self-flagellating woman who cruelly jilted Louie (Danny DeVito) in the fourth-season episode "Louie's Fling." Receiving a phone call, Louie discovers that the caller is Emily, who is in the throes of alcoholic desperation. A vengeful Louie schemes to take advantage of Emily's vulnerability in order to get even with her -- but things don't exactly work out that way! ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: The Road Not Taken, Part 1 In the first episode of Taxi's two-part season-four finale, Elaine (Marilu Henner) mulls over the opportunity to leave the Sunshine Cab Company for a job in Seattle. This inspires the other cabbies to recall the pivotal moments in their own lives. Louie (Danny DeVito) remembers his ascension from driver to dispatcher; Tony (Tony Danza) recollects the moment that he was offered big bucks to take a dive; and Reverend Jim (Christopher Lloyd) harks back to his days of cogency -- and cleanliness -- as a Harvard undergrad (Jim's druggie roomate is played by none other than Tom Hanks). ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: The Unkindest Cut A decidedly pre-Cheers Ted Danson delivers a hilarious guest performance as Vincenzo, an extremely flamboyant -- and extraordinarily expensive -- New York hairdresser. Shelling out 200 hard-earned dollars for a treatment from Vincenzo, Elaine (Marilu Henner) is shocked by the hideous results, which make her look like an electrified mop. Even so, Elaine is too timid to demand her money back, so it falls to her fellow cabbies to come to her rescue. Alas, the imperious Vincenzo refuses to undo his damage -- resulting in a surprising and rather messy act of gallantry from Louie (Danny DeVito). ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Bobby Doesn't Live Here Anymore Former Taxi regular Jeff Conaway returns to the series as erstwhile actor Bobby Wheeler. Freshly arrived from Hollywood, Bobby uses the garage as his unofficial headquarters while he awaits news as to whether or not his TV pilot has been sold to a network. Certain that the show is a "go," Bobby throws a party for all of his old friends -- and of course, whenever something like that happens on Taxi, at least one of the characters is riding for a fall. ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: The Road Not Taken, Part 2 In the conclusion of a two-part story, the cabbies recall the "turning points" in their own lives as Elaine (Marilu Henner) considers an offer to leave New York for a new job. In the course of events, Latka (Andy Kaufman) flashes back to the day he left his (unpronounceable) homeland to start life anew in the U.S., and Alex (Judd Hirsch) remembers the humiliating event which convinced him to kiss the corporate world goodbye. This was the final episode of Taxi's fourth season and the last one to be telecast on ABC before the series' move to rival NBC. ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Louie and the Blind Girl Murphy Cross reprises her role as Judy, the blind girl whom Louie (Danny DeVito) dated in the earlier fifth-season episode "The Shloogel Show." The good news is that Judy is undergoing an operation to restore her sight. The bad news, so far as Louie is concerned, is that Judy is undergoing an operation to restore her sight. It's a situation right out of Charlie Chaplin: Will Judy still be as fond of Louie when she looks down and gazes upon his homely mug for the first time? ~ All Movie Guide Taxi: Sugar Ray Nardo Single mom
  • National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation - Blu-ray Disc

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Nov 3, 2009

    Chevy Chase, star of National Lampoon's Vacation and its sequel, is back as the paterfamilias of the Griswold family (including Beverly D'Angelo as his missus) to skewer the Yuletide season. Chevy mugs, trips, falls, mashes his fingers and stubs his toes as he prepares to invite numerous dysfunctional relatives to his household to celebrate Christmas. Amidst the more outrageous sight gags (including the electrocution of a cat as the Christmas tree is lit) the film betrays a sentimental streak, with old wounds healing and long-estranged relatives reuniting in the Griswold living room. National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation was still capable of attracting an audience five years after its release: It was one of the top-rated seasonal TV specials of 1994, outrating even the first network telecast of It's a Wonderful Life. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide
  • National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation - DVD

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Nov 3, 2009

    Chevy Chase, star of National Lampoon's Vacation and its sequel, is back as the paterfamilias of the Griswold family (including Beverly D'Angelo as his missus) to skewer the Yuletide season. Chevy mugs, trips, falls, mashes his fingers and stubs his toes as he prepares to invite numerous dysfunctional relatives to his household to celebrate Christmas. Amidst the more outrageous sight gags (including the electrocution of a cat as the Christmas tree is lit) the film betrays a sentimental streak, with old wounds healing and long-estranged relatives reuniting in the Griswold living room. National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation was still capable of attracting an audience five years after its release: It was one of the top-rated seasonal TV specials of 1994, outrating even the first network telecast of It's a Wonderful Life. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide
  • Holiday Comedy Collection: Elf/National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation/Fred Claus

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Oct 6, 2009

    Includes:National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation (1989), MPAA Rating: PG-13 Elf (2003), MPAA Rating: PG Fred Claus (2007), MPAA Rating: PG National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation Chevy Chase, star of National Lampoon's Vacation and its sequel, is back as the paterfamilias of the Griswold family (including Beverly D'Angelo as his missus) to skewer the Yuletide season. Chevy mugs, trips, falls, mashes his fingers and stubs his toes as he prepares to invite numerous dysfunctional relatives to his household to celebrate Christmas. Amidst the more outrageous sight gags (including the electrocution of a cat as the Christmas tree is lit) the film betrays a sentimental streak, with old wounds healing and long-estranged relatives reuniting in the Griswold living room. National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation was still capable of attracting an audience five years after its release: It was one of the top-rated seasonal TV specials of 1994, outrating even the first network telecast of It's a Wonderful Life. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Elf For his sophomore stab at directing, actor/writer/director Jon Favreau (Swingers, Made), took on this holiday comedy starring Saturday Night Live-alum Will Ferrell. Ferrell stars as Buddy, a regular-sized man who was raised as an elf by Santa Claus (Edward Asner). When the news is finally broken to Buddy that he's not a real elf, he decides to head back to his place of birth, New York City, in search of his biological family. Elf also stars James Caan, Mary Steenburgen, Zooey Deschanel, and Bob Newhart. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide Fred Claus Santa's black-sheep brother gets a much-needed shot at redemption in this holiday comedy reuniting actor Vince Vaughn and director David Dobkin (Clay Pigeons, Wedding Crashers). It's not easy being the brother of a benevolent and beloved saint, and no one knows that better than Fred Claus (Vaughn). After struggling for years to live up to the example set by his younger sibling Nicholas (Paul Giamatti), Fred has finally given up. These days Fred is working as a repo man taken to stealing the items he repossesses, and his shady tactics have just landed him in jail. While Mrs. Claus vehemently insists that Fred fend for himself, Nicholas refuses to sit idly by as his brother rots in jail and agrees to set bail if Fred will repay the debt by coming to the North Pole and help make toys for the upcoming Christmas season. But Fred isn't nearly as productive as your average elf, and he's got quite an attitude to boot. With Christmas fast approaching and Fred threatening to sideline Nicholas' entire finely tuned operation, the brother that always struggled to get out from under his sibling's substantial shadow finds out just how far the patience of a saint can be pushed before jolly old Santa reaches his breaking point. ~ Jason Buchanan, All Movie Guide
  • Once-upon-a-time_home_top_story

    'Once Upon A Time''s Wicked Witch Rebecca Mader talks up being green

    Type: Post | Date: Friday, Apr 4, 2014

    'It's really delicious when we go toe-to-toe' she says of Regina
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