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171 search results for The Night Eternal

  • Poster-art-for-vamps_home_top_story

    Vamps

    Type: Event | Date: Friday, Nov 2, 2012

    Vampires find trouble with love and dating.
  • Poster-art-for-this-time_home_top_story

    This Time

    Type: Event | Date: Friday, Aug 10, 2012

    Backup singers struggling for the spotlight are the focus of this documentary.
  • This-years-american-idol-top-six._home_top_story

    American Idol

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, May 22, 2012

    The finalists compete one last time tonight.
  • G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero: The Complete Series

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Nov 10, 2009

    Includes:G.I. Joe: Twenty Questions (1985) G.I. Joe: Eye For an Eye (1985) G.I. Joe: The Traitor, Part Two (1985) G.I. Joe: Skeleton in the Closet (1985) G.I. Joe: Countdown for Zartan (1985) G.I. Joe: No Place Like Springfield, Part Two (1985) G.I. Joe: No Place Like Springfield, Part One (1985) G.I. Joe: The Great Alaskan Land Rush (1985) G.I. Joe: The Invaders (1985) G.I. Joe: The Wrong Stuff (1985) G.I. Joe: The Pit of Vipers (1985) G.I. Joe: Memories of Mara (1985) G.I. Joe: Pyramid of Darkness, Part Three (1985) G.I. Joe: Pyramid of Darkness, Part Two (1985) G.I. Joe: Operation Mind Menace (1985) G.I. Joe: The Funhouse (1985) G.I. Joe: Cobra's Creatures (1985) G.I. Joe: Jungle Trap (1985) G.I. Joe: Cobra Stops the World (1985) G.I. Joe: Satellite Down (1985) G.I. Joe: Red Rocket's Glare (1985) G.I. Joe: Cobra Soundwaves (1985) G.I. Joe: Money to Burn (1985) G.I. Joe: Cobra's Candidate (1985) G.I. Joe: Lights! Camera! Cobra! (1985) G.I. Joe: The Phantom Brigade (1985) G.I. Joe: The Synthoid Conspiracy, Part Two (1985) G.I. Joe: The Synthoid Conspiracy, Part One (1985) G.I. Joe: Haul Down the Heavens (1985) G.I. Joe: The Greenhouse Effect (1985) G.I. Joe: Spell of the Siren (1985) G.I. Joe: The Viper is Coming (1985) G.I. Joe: The Germ (1985) G.I. Joe: The Battle for the Train of Gold (1985) G.I. Joe: Pyramid of Darkness, Part Four (1985) G.I. Joe: Pyramid of Darkness, Part One (1985) G.I. Joe: Lasers in the Night (1985) G.I. Joe: The Gamesmaster (1985) G.I. Joe: Where the Reptiles Roam (1985) G.I. Joe: Hearts and Cannons (1985) G.I. Joe: Flint's Vacation (1985) G.I. Joe: Primordial Plot (1985) G.I. Joe: The Gods Below (1985) G.I. Joe: Cobra CLAWs are Coming to Town (1985) G.I. Joe: Eau de Cobra (1985) G.I. Joe: Excalibur (1985) G.I. Joe: Bazooka Saw a Sea Serpent (1985) G.I. Joe: Cobra Quake (1985) G.I. Joe: Pyramid of Darkness, Part Five (1985) G.I. Joe: Cold Slither (1985) G.I. Joe: The Traitor, Part One (1985) G.I. Joe: Worlds Without End, Part Two (1985) G.I. Joe: Captives of Cobra, Part One (1985) G.I. Joe: Worlds Without End, Part One (1985) G.I. Joe: Captives of Cobra, Part Two (1985) G.I. Joe: Grey Hair and Growing Pains (1986) G.I. Joe: In the Presence of Mine Enemies (1986) G.I. Joe: Sins of Our Fathers (1986) G.I. Joe: Joe's Night Out (1986) G.I. Joe: Second Hand Emotions (1986) G.I. Joe: Nightmare Assault (1986) G.I. Joe: The Most Dangerous Thing in the World (1986) G.I. Joe: G.I. Joe and the Golden Fleece (1986) G.I. Joe: Ninja Holiday (1986) G.I. Joe: Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Part Five (1986) G.I. Joe: Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Part Four (1986) G.I. Joe: Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Part Three (1986) G.I. Joe: Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Part Two (1986) G.I. Joe: Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Part One (1986) G.I. Joe: The Spy That Rooked Me (1986) G.I. Joe: Glamour Girls (1986) G.I. Joe: Cobrathon (1986) G.I. Joe: Sink the Montana (1986) G.I. Joe: Raise the Flagg! (1986) G.I. Joe: My Brother's Keeper (1986) G.I. Joe: Iceberg Goes South (1986) G.I. Joe: The Rotten Egg (1986) G.I. Joe: Million Dollar Medic (1986) G.I. Joe: Once Upon a Joe... (1986) G.I. Joe: Let's Play Soldier (1986) G.I. Joe: Computer Complications (1986) G.I. Joe: Last Hour to Doomsday (1986) G.I. Joe: My Favorite Things (1986) G.I. Joe: Into Your Tent I Will Silently Creep (1986) G.I. Joe: Not a Ghost of a Chance (1986) G.I. Joe: Twenty Questions The Joe team's war games are interrupted by Hector Ramirez, muckraking host of the TV series "Twenty Questions." Ramirez has brought along a peacenik named Arnold, who claims that the Joes are frauds who use the threat of Cobra attack as a means to cheat the American taxpayers. Hoping to prove Arnold wrong, Shipwreck conducts an unauthorized tour of the Joes' headquarters -- only to discover that Arnold is really the evil Baroness in disguise. Written by Buzz Dixon, "Twenty Questions" made its American TV debut on October 2, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Eye For an Eye A fierce battle between the Cobras and the Joes has devastating consequences on a family of innocent bystanders. Though his loved ones are safe, Charles Fairmont is enraged over the destruction of his home. Invading the Joes' base in search of revenge, Fairmont finds an unexpected ally in the form of Lady Jaye, who feels personally responsible for the man's plight. Written by Steve Mitchell and Barbara Petty, "Eye for an Eye" made its American TV debut on November 8, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Traitor, Part Two In the conclusion of a two-part adventure, the Joes have rescued Dusty from prison, certain that his traitorous behavior was borne of desperation over the plight of his sick mother. But can Dusty be reformed, and will he prove a valuable member of the Joe team? Apparently not: When Cobra tries to test its new mind-control gas on the Joes, Dusty assists the villains every step of the way. Be assured, however, that the story is not quite over yet. Written by Buzz Dixon, part two of the "The Traitor" originally aired in America on November 26, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Skeleton in the Closet Upon receiving an inheritance, Joe member Lady Jaye journeys to her ancestral home in Scotland. Feeling that something is amiss, LJ soon learns the awful truth: She is related to her longtime enemy Destro. The ensuing battle royal between the Joes and Cobras turns out to be the result of a carefully mapped scheme by another old enemy. A neat twist caps this episode, which was written by Flint Dille. "Skeleton in the Closet" first aired in America on December 11, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Countdown for Zartan Zartan is hired by Cobra Commander to blow up a peace conference at World Wide Defense Center, thereby covering up secret information about Cobra's terrorist activities. Posing as a kidnapped French scientist, Zartan is exposed by Joe member Spirit -- who is promptly abducted by Storm Shadow. The other members of the Joe Team race against the clock to locate and disarm Zartan's bomb. Written by Christy Marx, "Countdown for Zartan" first aired in America on September 23, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: No Place Like Springfield, Part Two In the concluding chapter of a two-part story, Shipwreck finally realizes that his "new" life as a family man in the town of Springfield is actually a sham, created by Cobra to force him to reveal the deadly water-to-explosive formula locked in his subconscious. Rescued from madness by Polly, Shipwreck does his best to foil Cobra's plans -- if only he can locate the rest of the Joe Team. But there's a tragic price to pay for the good guys' ultimate victory. Written by Steve Gerber, "No Place Like Springfield, Pt. 2" first aired in America on December 13, 1985, as the final episode of G.I. Joe's first TV season. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: No Place Like Springfield, Part One In the first episode of a two-part adventure, Dr. Melany's new formula for changing water into explosive is planted in Shipwreck's subconscious -- and only Lady Jaye knows the code word that will release the formula. Upon awakening from an unusually deep sleep, Shipwreck discovers that several years have passed, and that his has settled down to a cozy domestic existence with his wife, Mara (formerly a mermaid), and his daughter. Slowly but surely, however, Shipwreck senses that something is not quite right about his new surroundings. Written by Steve Gerber, "No Place Like Springfield, Pt. 1" first aired in America on December 12, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Great Alaskan Land Rush Claiming to a have found a legal loophole in Seward's Alaskan purchase of 1867, Cobra and a shifty used car dealer named Gorgy Potemkin gain full control of Alaska. Their plans include using the 49th state as a power base to attack the rest of the world. Once again, the Joes join forces with the Soviet Oktober Guard to foil Cobra's scheme. Written by David Carren, "The Great Alaskan Land Rush" was first telecast in America on December 3, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Invaders Both the U.S. and the U.S.S.R. are held in thrall by an apparent alien invasion of Earth. It soon develops, however, that the "invasion" has been orchestrated by Cobra, as part of a scheme to destroy both Moscow and Washington and establish Cobra as the world's only superpower. This time around, the Joes are joined by their Soviet counterparts, the Oktober Guard, in thwarting the villain's plans. Written by Dennis O'Neil, "The Invaders" originally aired in America on November 29, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Wrong Stuff Could it be that writers Stanley Ralph Ross and Flint Dille had a certain Atlanta-based TV mogul in mind when they wrote this episode of G.I. Joe? On this occasion, Cobra removes all space satellites from orbit, the better to create a worldwide broadcasting monopoly, Cobra Network Television. By offering twisted "message" sitcoms like "Father's No Beast" and even (horrors!) changing the endings of classic old films, the CTN is aimed at controlling the minds of all earthlings -- or at least, all cable subscribers. "The Wrong Stuff" first aired in America on November 28, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Pit of Vipers The G.I. Joe team is placed under the command of the new super-computer Watchdog, which has ostensibly been designed to seek out Cobra targets. Little do the heroes realize that Watchdog has been created by the Cobras themselves, and is programmed to send the Joes far off the beaten track, leaving their headquarters vulnerable to Cobra's deadly Pit Viper attacks. James M. Ward wrote the script, from an original story by Flint Dille. "The Pit of Vipers" originally aired in the U.S. on November 27, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Memories of Mara The titular Mara is a blue-skinned women whom we first see wearing a Cobra diving suit. Rescued by Joe Team member Shipwreck, Mara reveals that she is the half-human, half-fish result of a misfire Cobra experiment aimed at enabling humans to remain underwater indefinitely. With Mara's help, the Joes try to locate the U.S.S. Nerka, a submarine stolen by Cobra. Written by Sharman Di Vono, "Memories of Mara" first aired in the U.S. on November 15, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Pyramid of Darkness, Part Three In the third episode of the five-part |Pyramid of Darkness, Joe Team members Lady Jaye, Flint, Shipwreck, and Snake Eyes have managed to escape the perils presented them in the previous episode, "Rendezvous in the City of the Dead." A new ally is introduced in the form of a sexy nightclub singer named Satin. Cobra functionary Zartan manages to activate the control cubes, setting off a chain events culminating in a dangerous encounter with killer seals on an iceberg. Written by Ron Friedman, "Three Cubes to Darkness" first aired in America on September 18, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Pyramid of Darkness, Part Two In the second episode of the five-part |Pyramid of Darkness, the G.I. Joe team leads a counteroffensive against Cobra in hopes of regaining Space Station Delta. Joe members Shipwreck and Snake-Eyes are able to steal some of the all-important control cubes and a laser weapon, leading to a near-fatal escapade in a volcano called the Devil's Playground. Meanwhile, the dreaded Dreadnoks delighting in tormenting the captured Joes who have been forced into slave labor on Delta. Written by Ron Friedman, Rendezvous in the City of the Dead first aired in America on September 17, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Operation Mind Menace Taking control of the minds of several innocent civilians, Cobra artificially expands their powers, organizing his captives into an offensive army. Among these new mind-slaves is Tommy, the brother of G.I. Joe team member Airborne. Racing to Tommy's rescue, Airborne and Flash soon find themselves in need of rescuing. Written by Martin Pasko, "Operation Mind Menace" made its American TV debut on October 15, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Funhouse Cobra makes no effort to hide the fact that it has kidnapped five of the world's top scientists. It is all part of Cobra Commander's scheme to wreak a terrible vengeance on the G.I. Joe team. Lured to a South American island, the Joes find themselves at the mercy of Cobra's booby traps in a simulated funhouse -- and never have a rollercoaster and shooting gallery seemed more sinister. Written by Steve Mitchell and Barbara Petty, "The Funhouse" first aired in the U.S. on October 1, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Cobra's Creatures This time, Cobra has gotten hold of a device called Hi-Freq, invented by one Dr. Lucifer. The device enables the villains to gain mind control over all the animals of the world. To test Hi-Freq, Cobra kidnaps G.I. Joe team members Mutt, Junkyard. and Ripcord as human guinea pigs. Meanwhile, the other Joes try to win over Dr. Lucifer by having Lady Jaye pose as the scientist's sweetheart, Dr. Attila. Written by Kimmer Ringwald, "Cobra's Creatures" made its first American TV appearance on September 30, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Jungle Trap In its efforts to harness the raw energy supplies in the center of the earth, Cobra kidnaps eminent scientist Dr. Shakoor. Forced to do Cobra's bidding, Shakoor devises the awesome Vulcan Machine. Meanwhile, the G.I. Joe team endeavors to rescue the missing scientist -- a task comparable to finding a needle in the world's largest haystack. Written by future Batman: The Animated Series maven Paul Dini, "Jungle Trap" originally aired in America on September 27, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Cobra Stops the World Cobra attempts to gain control of the world's fuel supplies so that the leaders of Earth will knuckle under to his demands. With each passing hour, Cobra utilizes his weaponry to destroy another oil tanker. The G.I. Joe teams races against the clock to track down the source of the destruction, and in the process, team members Duke and Ace find themselves imprisoned in an all-but-impenetrable jungle. Written by Steve Gerber, "Cobra Stops the World" first aired in America on September 26, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Satellite Down Breaker manages to force a G.I. Joe spy satellite stolen by Cobra to crash somewhere in the African jungle. Both the Joe and Cobra teams race into unchartered territory to recover the satellite, only to discover that the device has been adopted as a "god" by a lost tribe called the Primords. This episode contains a cute closing gag involving the Primords' reaction to that demon machine known as Television. Written by Ted Pederson, "Satellite Down" first aired in the U.S. on September 25, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Red Rocket's Glare Extensive Enterprises, a front organization for Cobra, uses a vicious gang of bikers to force the owners of the Red Rocket Drive-Thru Diners to sell out at bargain-basement prices. It is the first step in a scheme to install sophisticated anti-personnel weapons throughout the country. But Cobra has not taken into consideration the G.I. Joe team -- specifically, team member Roadblock, whose aunt and uncle own one of the beleaguered Red Rocket restaurants. Written by Mary Skrenes, "Red Rocket's Glare" originally aired in the U.S. on September 24, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Cobra Soundwaves This time, Cobra has gotten hold of an anti-aircraft gun which emits sonic waves for sinister purposes. Acting quickly, the villains threaten to use the weapon to destroy the oil resources of a Middle Eastern nation. But the G.I. Joe team has likewise swung into action, and they're not about to be "soundly" beaten by the Cobra forces. Written by Ted Pederson, "Cobra Soundwaves" originally aired in America on October 17, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Money to Burn Cobra destroys America's economy by vaporizing all of the country's money. He then takes steps to gain complete control by distributing his own personalized currency. To counteract this financial disaster, G.I. Joe team member Lady Jaye poses as Cobra's filthy-rich "client" Gloria Vonderhoss. Making its first American television appearance on October 14, 1985 (a few weeks later in some local markets), "Money to Burn" was written by Roger Slifer. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Cobra's Candidate In the midst of a heated political campaign, Cobra Commander hopes to sway voters to his handpicked candidate, Robert Harper, by casting Harper in the role of persecuted underdog. To that end, Cobra enlists the aid of a tough street gang, who stages riots which appear to be the handiwork of Harper's opponent, Whittier Greenway. The plan is foiled when a hitherto unsupsected link between the street gang and the G.I. Joe team is revealed. Written by Gordon Kent, "Cobra's Candidate" originally aired in the U.S. on October 11, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Lights! Camera! Cobra! Several of the G.I. Joe team's more contentious members are hired as technical advisors for the Hollywood epic "The G.I. Joe Story." Striving for realism, the producers have stored several authentic Joe and Cobra weapons in their prop shed, including a genuine Cobra Firebat plane. In his efforts to steal the plane, Cobra commander must rely upon the mercurial Destro and the unpredictable Dreadnoks. The story outcome is determined by the studio's crack team of special effects wizards. Written by Buzz Dixon, "Lights! Camera! Cobra!" first aired in the U.S. on October 10, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Phantom Brigade Cobra Commander uses an elderly gypsy woman to conjure up three dangerous ghosts: a Roman legionnaire, a Mongol warrior, and an American WWI flying ace. He then sends them into battle against the G.I. Joe team, secure in the knowledge that phantoms can't be killed or injured. The Joes attempt to mount a counteroffensive by appealing to the dormant patriotism of the American ghost. Written by Sharman Di Vono, "The Phantom Brigade" originally aired in America on October 9, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Synthoid Conspiracy, Part Two In the conclusion of a two-part story, Cobra has managed to cut off funding for the G.I. Joe team with the use of his Synthoids, humanlike creatures programmed to do the villains' bidding. Even worse, Joe member Duke has been replaced by his Synthoid clone. Managing to escape Cobra's clutches, Duke links up with his fellow Joes in an effort to stem the Synthoid invasion -- receiving unexpected assistance in the form of the evil Destro, who is again locked in a power struggle with his Cobra bosses. Written by Christy Marx, "The Synthoid Conspiracy, Pt. 2" first aired in America on October 8, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Synthoid Conspiracy, Part One In the first episode of a two-part story, Cobra infiltrates the committee responsible for funding the activities of the G.I. Joe team. The villains replace several key members with lookalike Synthoid, which have been programmed to bend exclusively to Cobra's will. Not only do the Joes lose their financial base, but to make matters worse, team member Duke is likewise replaced by a lookalike Synthoid. Written by Christy Marx, "The Synthoid Conspiracy, Pt. 1" first aired in America on October 7, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Haul Down the Heavens Cobra encamps itself at the North Pole, the better to use the powerful Ion Attractor to melt the polar ice cap and upset the ecological balance of the earth. To prevent this, G.I. Joe team members Flint, Lady Jaye, and Snow Job, together with a group of scientists, head to the Arctic, only to find out that the villains are more than prepared for such a counteroffensive. The episode's highlight is Lady Jaye's tone-deaf rendition of the U.S. Marine Hymn. Written by television cartoon veteran Buzz Dixon, "Haul Down the Heavens" originally aired in America on October 4, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Greenhouse Effect A non-polluting rocket fuel that causes plants to grow to enormous size is stolen by a member of the Crimson Guards. Chortling in glee, Cobra leader Destro plans to use the fuel to create an army of killer plants. The episode's climax is a bizarre, gargantuan "food fight" between the Cobras and the G.I. Joe team. Written by Gordon Kent, "The Greenhouse Effect" made its first American TV appearance on October 3, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Spell of the Siren The Baroness hatches another scheme to take over Cobra. Her first step is to harness the power of the Conch of the Siren to hypnotize the male team members of both the Cobras and the Joes. Inevitably, it is up to the female Joes -- and a few stray unaffected males who had been off base during the Siren's aural assault -- to rescue their comrades. Written by Gerry and Carla Conway, "Spell of the Siren" was first broadcast in America on October 25, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Viper is Coming Responding to what they think are cryptic challenges from Cobra, the G.I. Joe team, led by Barbecue, heads to various parts of the world, armed for battle. Only after the dust is settled do they realize that it's all a false alarm. The climax of David Carren's teleplay was obviously inspired by one of the oldest and most familiar schoolyard jokes in academic history. "The Viper Is Coming" originally aired in America on October 24, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Germ A member of the Crimson Guard steals a vial containing Bacteria X. The usual red tape delays delivery of this vial to Destro. In the meantime, the Bacteria X is accidentally mixed with a new growth serum, resulting in a huge, gelatine monstrosity. The G.I. Joe team tries to destroy this hideous new threat, only to succeeding in doubling the danger at hand. Roger Slifer's script is a sly parody of the classic horror cheapie The Blob -- and what an ending! "The Germ" originally aired in America on October 23, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Battle for the Train of Gold Stealing a cassette containing the blueprints of Fort Knox, Cobra concocts a scheme to rob the gold treasury. At the behest of the Bureau of Engraving, the G.I. Joe team works undercover and awaits Cobra's inevitable strike. Though the villains succeed in disabling the Joes' vehicles and weapons, the good guys are able to borrow several of Kentucky's best thoroughbred racing horses during the final counteroffensive. Written by David Carren, "The Battle for the Train of Gold" first aired in America on October 16, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Pyramid of Darkness, Part Four In the fourth episode of the five-part |Pyramid of Darkness, Bazooka and Alpine are rescued by martial artist Quick-Kick, who is prompted recruited into the G.I. Joe team. Continuing in their efforts to regain control of Space Station Delta from Cobra, the Joes end up in a graveyard of sunken ships called the Sea of Lost Souls. Unfortunately, the Cobra team manages to retrieve all four of the elusive control cubes, enabling them to form the all-powerful Pyramid which will give Cobra absolute control of the world -- and the means to destroy G.I. Joe once and for all. Written by Ron Friedman, "Chaos in the Sea of Lost Souls" first aired in America on September 19, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Pyramid of Darkness, Part One Two years after the introductory cartoon miniseries G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero and one year after the following miniseries G.I. Joe: The Revenge of Cobra, the daily animated G.I. Joe series proper commenced with part one of the five-episode adventure |Pyramids of Darkness. The opening chapter, "The Further Adventures of G.I. Joe," was written by Ron Friedman, and was seen in most American markets on September 16, 1985. Things get off to a rousing start as the evil organization Cobra gains control of the G.I. Joe team's Delta space station, using Delta's weapon system to attack Joe headquarters and jam all of earth's electrical devices. Crucial to the action are four control cubes, which when placed in alignment create an all-powerful Pyramid, with which Cobras hopes to rule the world. "The Further Adventures of G.I. Joe" includes such trapping as a wild chase through Enterprise City and a flock of tribble-like creatures called the Fatal Fluffies, who can turn really bad in the wrong hands. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Lasers in the Night Cobra Commander draws up plans to steal the G.I. Joe team's new laser device. The theft is not so much for power as for ego; the Commander intends to create a monument to himself on the Moon. Meanwhile, a romance develops between Quick-Kick and pretty Joe Team trainee Amber, who, predictably, ends up being used as a pawn by the villains. Written by Marv Wolfman, "Lasers in the Night" was originally telecast in America on October 22, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Gamesmaster G.I. Joe team members Lady Jaye and Flint, together with their deadly rivals Cobra Commander and the Baroness, are captured en masse by a looney named the Gamesmaster. The four enemies must join forces to stay alive during a (literal) manhunt on Gamesmaster's gadget-laden private island, which looks deceptively like a huge amusement park. Flint Dille's teleplay was obviously inspired by the classic Richard Connell short story The Most Dangerous Game. "The Gamesmaster" originally aired in the U.S. on October 21, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Where the Reptiles Roam A dude ranch in Western Texas is purchased by one of Cobra's dummy corporations. G.I. Joe team member Wild Bill and his friends now have their hands full trying to keep Cobra from gaining control of the solar energy farm next door to the ranch. When Cobra's weapons prove too powerful, Wild Bill cannily relies upon the unharnessed energy of a good old-fashioned cattle stampede. Written by Gerry and Carla Conway, "Where the Reptiles Roam" first aired in the U.S. on October 18, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Hearts and Cannons G.I. Joes Footloose and Dusty infiltrate Cobra's desert base, where captured scientist Dr. Nancy Winters is being forced to work on a powerful new Plasma Cannon Tank. Rescuing Nancy, the two Joes spend as much time vying for her affections as they do preventing Cobra from putting the Tank into operation. And what about that contentious local character named Jabal? Scripted by Alfred A. Pegel and Larry Houston from a story by Pegel, "Hearts and Cannons" was first broadcast in America on November 14, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Flint's Vacation Joe Team member Flint heads to the new housing project of Please Cove, hoping to spend some quality time with his cousin's family. He soon discovers that the project's inhabitants have been brainwashed and enslaved by Cobra -- and the dreaded Drednoks have been pressed into service as the local police force. Beth Bornstein's teleplay cleverly redefines the old sci-fi film classic Invasion of the Body Snatchers in TV-cartoon terms. "Flint's Vacation" was first telecast in America on November 13, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Primordial Plot Cobra steals a cache of petrified bones, then kidnaps cloning expert Dr. Massey. The result is a newly hatched crop of deadly dinosaurs, which even the Joes are at a loss to contain. And remember, folks, this was several years before the release of Spielberg's Jurassic Park. "Primordial Plot" was written by Donald F. Glut, one of the finest science fiction purveyors working in television. The episode originally aired in America on November 12, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Gods Below Once again, Cobra Commander is in need of quick cash to finance his world-domination scheme. To that end, the Commander lures the Joes into a treasure hunt at the newly excavated tomb of Osiris in Egypt. Things get complicated when the Joes and scientist Dr. Marsh are confronted by the evil Egyptian God Set, who sends them hurtling into the Realm of the Dead. Written by Gordon Kent, "The Gods Below" first aired in America on November 11, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Cobra CLAWs are Coming to Town Christmas is coming and the Joes take upon themselves to distribute used toys to needy children. Unfortunately, the toy supply is infiltrated by Cobra's troops, who have been shrunken to action-figure size. In this reduced state, the villains contrive to sway public sentiment against the good-guy Joes. When all is said and done, however, this episode exists primarily to introduce Hasbro's latest line of G.I. Joe toy products. Scripted by Carla and Gerry Conway from a story by Roy and Dan Thomas, "Cobra CLAWs are Coming to Town" originally aired in America on November 7, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Eau de Cobra The title of this G.I. Joe episode refers to a new brand of perfume, sweet to the smell, but devastating in its effect. The Baroness hopes to ensnare wealthy shipowner Socrates Arties by applying the perfume, which turns males into mind slaves. Alas, the ensuing passions get wildly out of control, thanks to a jealous Destro. Written by Flint Dille, "Eau de Cobra" made its first American TV appearance on November 6, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Excalibur Crash-landing in England's Lake District, Storm Shadow recovers the long-lost Sword Excalibur. This arouses the interest of Destro, who begins laying plans to seize the sword for his own use. Meanwhile, the Joes attempt to forestall future Cobra attacks on England, a task made difficult by the country's habitually unpredictable weather. Written by Dan DiStefano, "Excalibur" first aired in America on November 1, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Bazooka Saw a Sea Serpent Cobra has developed a mechanical sea serpent, which grows in size each time it devours a ship. Unfortunately, the villains lose control of the metallic monstrosity. Swallowing Cobras and Joes alike, the renegade serpent starts making a beeline for helpless New York City. Beany and Cecil this isn't! Written by Mary Skenes, "Bazooka Saw a Sea Serpent" was first telecast in America on October 31, 1985 -- perfect timing for a Halloween prank. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Cobra Quake A new technology has been developed to stop earthquakes before they begin. Cobra reverses that technology, intending to wreak havoc at a Third World Council peace conference in Japan. Assigned to guard the delegates, the Joes end up in a desperate search for Cobra's booby traps in three different, far-flung locations. Written by Ted Pederson, "Cobra Quake" made its first American TV appearance on October 28, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Pyramid of Darkness, Part Five In the concluding episode of the five-part Pyramid of Darkness, Cobra has successfully assembled the Pyramid, which will give them absolute and unquestioned power over the world. Fortunately, the G.I. Joe team manages to escape Cobra's clutches, bearing up against all manner of deadly devices, including an immobilizing heat beam. As the episode races to a conclusion, the viewer is never entirely certain who will emerge triumphant (hint: the coda finds the villains in their characteristic "It's all your fault" mode). Written by Ron Friedman, "Knotting Cobra's Coils" first aired in America on September 20, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Cold Slither The Cobra Commander makes a startling discovery: He can no longer continue his efforts to rule the world because he is flat broke. Hoping to raise money in a hurry, the Commander utilizes the "hidden persuasion" method by hiring Zartan and the Drednoks to pose as musicians, then inserts mind-control messages in the music in order to enslave the group's fans. Alas, even three Joe members fall victim to the booby-trapped tunes. Something of a self-parody, this G.I. Joe episode was written by Charles Michael Hill. Though filmed as the final episode of season one, "Cold Slither" was telecast on December 2, 1985, long before the season finale. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Traitor, Part One In the first episode of a two-part story, a desperate Dusty is coerced into selling information about the G.I. Joes' new bullet-proof chemical armor protection. The recipient of this top-secret information is Cobra, who has promised to pay the medical bills for Dusty's ailing mother. Arrested for treason, Dusty is sprung from prison by the Joes themselves, who believe that extenuating circumstance and not treachery motivated the prisoner's rash actions. But is Dusty genuinely a victim of circumstance, or a villain in disguise? Written by Buzz Dixon, part one of "The Traitor" first aired in America on November 25, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Worlds Without End, Part Two In the conclusion of the two-part "Worlds Without End," Joe team members Flint, Lady Jaye, Airtight, Grunt, Clutch, and Steeler are still trapped in a parallel Earth, still at the mercy of the conquering Cobras. The Joes receive unexpected help from their old nemesis the Baroness -- who has been reinvented as a "good guy," in love with Steeler. Adopting a divide-and-conquer approach, the Baroness and the Joes foment a Cobra civil war. When the dust settles, three of the Joes choose to remain in the parallel world to continue fighting the good fight on behalf of their new confreres. Written by Martin Pasko, part two of "Worlds Without End" first aired in America on November 5, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Captives of Cobra, Part One In the first episode of a two-part story, Cobra kidnaps the family members of the G.I. Joe team, including the parents of Quick Kick, Thunder, and Scarlett. Using mind control, the villains turn their captives against the Joes. It is all part of a scheme to steal some highly explosive crystals created by a misfire chemical reaction. First telecast in America on October 29, 1985, part one of "Captives of Cobra" was written by G.I. Joe stalwart Christy Marx. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Worlds Without End, Part One In this first episode of a two-part adventure, Joe team members Flint, Lady Jaye, Airtight, Grunt, Clutch, and Steeler try to recover a matter transmutor stolen by the Dreadnoks. When the device is accidentally triggered, the Joes are hurled into a bizarre parallel world. Upon getting their bearings, they discover that, in this particular world, the Cobras have emerged triumphant over the Joes -- and the Drednoks are now the police force. Written by Martin Pasko, part one of "Worlds Without End" first aired in America on November 4, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Captives of Cobra, Part Two In the conclusion of a two-part story, several family members of the G.I. Joe team are still being held prisoner by Cobra, who hope to use their captives to retrieve some dangerously explosive chemicals. Team member Scarlett is able to rescue some of the captives -- who, because their minds have been enslaved by Cobra, prove to be almost as dangerous as their captors. Meanwhile, the villains overreach themselves by attempting to nab the extremely self-reliant family of Joe member Gung Ho. Written by Christy Marx, part two of "Captives of Cobra" was originally telecast in America on October 30, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Grey Hair and Growing Pains Serpentor steals Madame Versailles' special formula for making people younger -- or, if used improperly, making them older. Intending to exploit the treatment for his own evil purposes, Serpentor is unwittingly helped along by the vanity of Mme. Versailles' commercial spokespersons. In the course of events, three of the Joes age 50 years, another three team members regress into childhood, and Zarina and Mainframe stage a deadly confrontation. Written by Dave Marconi and Flint Dille, "Grey Hair and Growing Pains" first aired in America on October 14, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: In the Presence of Mine Enemies Joe Team member Slip Stream finds himself stranded on a monster-infested island with a beautiful female StratoViper named Raven. At first, the two natural enemies devote their energies to wiping one another out. But Raven changes her mind when she discovers that she has been set up as a "dead duck" by her leader, the Cobra Commander. Written by Chris Weber and Karen Wilson, "In the Presence of Mine Enemies" originally aired in America on November 19, 1986, as the final second-season episode of G.I. Joe. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Sins of Our Fathers Dismissed from the Joe Team, Dial-Tone is unwittingly plunked in the middle of another power struggle between Cobra Commander and Serpentor. The action shifts to Scotland, ending up at Destro's ancestral castle. Both Joes and Cobras are forced to fight side by side when they are threatened by a horrible monster, summoned from the past. Scripted by Buzz Dixon from a story by Steve Gerber, "Sins of Our Fathers" first aired in America on November 18, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Joe's Night Out Three of the Joes -- Wet Suit, Leatherneck, and Dial-Tone -- accompany their dates to the opening of a trendy new night club. They are subsequently abducted along with all the other patrons when the "club" turns out to be a rocket in disguise, courtesy of Cobra. Hurled into deep space, the hostages will be returned only on condition that research scientist Dr. Melany assist Cobra in developing a powerful new plane engine. First broadcast in America on November 10, 1986, "Joe's Night Out" was written by David Schwartz. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Second Hand Emotions Dr. Mindbender and Serpentor develop an electronic organ capable of manipulating emotions. The villains play the organ at the wedding of LifeLine's sister, hoping thereby to force the Joe Team members into destroying themselves. Something old, something new, something borrowed, and something blue (blew up, that is). Written by Carla and Gerry Conway, "Second Hand Emotions" made its first U.S. television appearance on October 31, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Nightmare Assault The latest Cobra device for deviltry is something called the Somulator. Deploying this device, Dr. Mindbender is able to enter and alter the dreams of the Joe Team members, causing horrible nightmares which result in carelessness and a drop in morale. But the "good" doctor himself falls victim to LowLife's all-too-vivid nightmare, consisting of the combined dreams of the other Joes. Written by Marv Wolfman, "Nightmare Assault" originally aired in America on October 30, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Most Dangerous Thing in the World During General Hawk's absence, Cobra wreaks havoc upon the Joe's computer system. As a result, the troublesome Shipwreck, LifeLine, and Dial-Tone are promoted to the rank of General. Needless to say, the trio is hardly officer material, and it is up to Hawk to undo the ensuing damage -- and to save the weakened Joe force from an all-out Cobra attack. Written by Buzz Dixon, "The Most Dangerous Thing in the World" first aired in America on October 29, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: G.I. Joe and the Golden Fleece At the Suez Canal, the Cobras attempt to recover a valuable golden coil from the wreckage of a crashed UFO. They are confronted by the Joes, and in the ensuing struggle a laser beam is accidentally triggered. Within seconds, Joes and Cobras alike a hurtled back in time to ancient Greece, where they are welcomed and worshipped as gods. Scripted by Richard Merwin from a story by Flint Dille, "G.I. Joe and the Golden Fleece" first aired in the U.S. on October 27, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Ninja Holiday Attending a martial arts competition, Joe Team member Sgt. Slaughter is "chosen" by a group of sinister ninjas for a special assignment. Unwillingly submitting himself to rigorous training, Sarge discovers that he has been selected to assassinate Cobra Emperor Serpentor. During the climactic chase, the Joe team faces opposition from a variety of martial-arts experts, many of whom are dressed like Village People rejects! Written by Michael Charles Hill, "Ninja Holiday" originally aired in the U.S. on October 22, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Part Five In the concluding chapter of a five-part adventure, the worst has happened: Dr. Mindbender has successfully melded the DNA of several past conquerors into a single, super-powered Cobra Emperor named Serpentor. Fortunately, Sgt. Slaughter and the rest of the G.I. Joe team manage to escape their Cobra captors and to mount a counteroffensive. Without giving away the ending, it can be noted that enough Joe and Cobra members are left standing to populate the subsequent episodes of G.I. Joe's second TV season. Written by Buzz Dixon, "Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Pt. 5" first aired in America on September 19, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Part Four In the fourth chapter of a five-part adventure, Cobra has successfully captured several members of the new G.I. Joe team. Dr. Mindbender is now certain that he can continue his plans to create a powerful Cobra Emperor named Serpentor unimpeded. Altering his scheme a bit, Mindbender is now determined to use Sgt. Slaughter's DNA in the creation process. Written by Buzz Dixon, "Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Pt. 4" first aired in America on September 18, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Part Three In the third chapter of a five-part adventure, the Joes run into danger in all corners of the world. Beach Head and Mainframe encounter trouble at Dracula's castles; Duke is jeopardized at Genghis Khan's tomb; Shipwreck is nearly scuttled at Alexander the Great's underwater crypt; and Sgt. Slaughter is captured near Sun Tzu's burial mound. On the "plus" side, the Joes finally discover that Cobra intends to use the DNA from past conquerors to create an omnipotent Cobra Emperor named Serpentor. Written by Buzz Dixon, "Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Pt. 3" first aired in America on September 17, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Part Two In the second chapter of a five-part adventure, the new G.I. Joe team scurries all over the world, trying to prevent Cobra from raiding the sacred resting places of such past leaders as Napoleon, Alexander the Great, and Ivan the Terrible. The heroes run into a great deal of interference, not only from Cobra but also from local politicians and bureaucrats. Meanwhile, Dr. Mindbender begins the process of assembling the new, all-powerful Cobra Emperor Serpentor. Written by Buzz Dixon, "Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Pt. 2" first aired in America on September 16, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Part One Season two of G.I. Joe was launched in America on September 15, 1986, with the first episode of the five-part adventure |Arise, Serpentor, Arise. Fed up with Cobra Commander's bungling, Dr. Mindbender decides to create a new, all-powerful Cobra Emperor, using the DNA of such past conquerers as Napoleon, Genghis Khan, Alexander the Great, Ivan the Terrible, and Sun Tzu. It is up to the brand-new G.I. Joe team to stop Mindbender in his tracks, but first, they have to figure out exactly what he is up to. "Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Pt. 1" was written by Buzz Dixon. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Spy That Rooked Me Also known as "The Spy Who Rooked Me," this episode focuses on a world-famous, Bond-like secret agent named Matthew Burke. After rescuing Joe team members Flint, Lady Jaye, Dial-Tone, and Cross-Country, Burke agrees to help them deliver some deadly nerve gas -- and, incidentally, to elude the diabolical Dr. Mindbender. Alas, Burke is so wrapped up in his own mistake that he nearly messes up the mission. Written with tongue firmly in cheek by Susan K. Williams, "The Spy That Rooked Me" originally aired in America on October 13, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Glamour Girls Desperately desiring eternal youth, Madame Veil relies upon the sinister resourcefulness of Cobra. The villains kidnap dozens of beautiful fashion models, intending to tap their youthfulness on behalf of Mme. Veil. The Joes go to the rescue, receiving unexpected help from one of the abducted models: Lowlight's own sister Una. Beth Bornstein's teleplay is more than a little beholden to the Georges Franju horror film Eyes Without a Face, especially near the end of the story. "Glamour Girls" made its American TV debut on October 8, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Cobrathon Cobra is in dire need of an expensive computer virus designed to cripple the records of law enforcement agencies throughout the world. But rather than pay for the device in the normal fashion, the villains choose to put on a pay-per-view telethon, staged in a hellish casino. In this perverse twist on the Jerry Lewis oeuvre, the telethon's "entertainment" includes the ritual torture of Joe members Sci-Fi and Lifeline. Written by Martin Pasko and Rebecca Parr, "Cobrathon" first aired in America on October 6, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Sink the Montana The unexpected catalyst for this episode is Admiral George Lattimer of the U.S. Navy. Unwilling to allow his beloved USS Montana to be scrapped, the admiral joins force with Cobra's Destro turns against the United States. The Joes must prevent Lattimer from using his obsolete but still-deadly battleship from destroying the entire Atlantic Fleet. Written by David Carren, "Sink the Montana" first aired in America on September 29, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Raise the Flagg! The Joes and the Cobras race against other to salvage the remains of the sunken aircraft carrier U.S.S. Flagg. The Joes get to the wreckage first, only to discover it is inhabited by a demented Cobra chef. In addition to deadly gastronomic efforts, the Joes must also contend with some BATs and an antimatter energy pod. Written by David Carren, "Raise the Flagg!" made its first American TV appearance on October 20, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: My Brother's Keeper Wheelchair-bound physicist Jeremy Penser allows himself to be duped by Cobra. In exchange for regaining the use of his legs, Dr. Penser agrees to help develop Cobra's latest weapon of destruction. So blindsided does Penser become that he nearly seals the doom of his own younger brother Timothy -- not to mention practically every member of the G.I. Joe team. Written by Buzz Dixon, "My Brother's Keeper" originally aired in America on October 15, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Iceberg Goes South Joe Team member Iceberg visits his girlfriend, Mahia, at her uncle's "Tropodome," a tropical biodome. Little does he suspect that Cobra's Dr. Mindbender is using the building as headquarters for his latest batch of diabolical genetic experiments. By the time the rest of the Joes show up, Iceberg has been converted into a hideous mutant. Written by Mary Skrenes, "Iceberg Goes South" first aired in America on October 9, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Rotten Egg Invited to be the guest of honor at a military academy, Leatherneck discovers that the institution is under the command of Cobra. Worse still, the head of the academy is a fugitive criminal named McCann -- who, as a raw Marine grunt, had been trained by Leatherneck at Parris Island. Seeking revenge for being booted from the service, Leatherneck is determined to use his own military strategy to destroy his former mentor. Written by Steve Mitchell and Barbara Petty, "The Rotten Egg" originally aired in America on October 7, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Million Dollar Medic LifeLine rescues Bree Van Mark, daughter of a wealthy industrialist, from a watery grave. To show her gratitude, Bree showers the reluctant LifeLine with expensive gifts -- including a gold-plated helicopter. Inevitably, the girl becomes a pawn in the latest Cobra scheme. Celebrated cartoon voice-over director Susan Blu is heard as Bree. Written by Carla and Gerry Conway, "Million Dollar Medic" first aired in America on October 2, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Once Upon a Joe... During a pitched battle between the Cobras and the Joes, an orphanage is accidentally destroyed, though the children emerge unscathed. As a new building is constructed, Shipwreck tries to keep the kids entertained, all the while endeavoring to prevent Zartan from recovering a lost Cobra weapon, the mysterious McGuffin Device (scriptwriter Buzz Dixon certainly knows his Hitchcock). The plot is partially resolved by orphan girl Jenny, who in many respects is quicker on the uptake than the Joes. "Once Upon a Joe..." originally aired in the U.S. on October 1, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Let's Play Soldier In Bangkok, Leatherneck takes charge of four "dust children," street orphans fathered by American GIs. Meanwhile, Cobra tries to enslave the population of Thailand by distributing chewing gum laced with Dr. Mindbender's latest mind-paralysis drug. As if that wasn't enough of a complication, the duplicitous Zarana leads the G.I. Joe team into another trap. Written by Sharman Di Vono, "Let's Play Soldier" first aired in the U.S. on September 30, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Computer Complications Cobra operative Zarana breaks into Joe headquarters, there to steal an antimatter deposit. Her plans are altered when she meets and falls in love with Joe team member Mainframes. Orders are orders, and Zarana has been ordered to kill Mainframe. David Schwartz's teleplay is chock-full of clever and unexpected plot twists. "Computer Complications" was first telecast in America on September 26, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Last Hour to Doomsday Cobra's latest weapon is the Vortex Cone, which plays havoc with the ocean's magnetic currents to cause huge tidal waves all over the world. Thus armed, the Cobra leader threatens to wipe out the entire East Coast if his demands are not meant. In their efforts to foil the villains, the Joe Teams deploys such strategies as having Lady Jaye impersonate the Baroness. Written by Tom Degenais, "Last Hour to Doomsday" originally aired in America on September 25, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: My Favorite Things Serpentor leads a band of Cobras in stealing the historical relics which, when assembled, form the DNA for Serpentor's personality matrix. The villains' problem: They must wrest these relics away from the even nastier despots who currently possess them. Meanwhile, Joe team member Wet-Suit learns a valuable lesson about self-control -- and nearly meets disaster in the castle of the original Count Dracula. Written by Doug Booth, "My Favorite Things" originally aired in America on October 16, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Into Your Tent I Will Silently Creep Joe team member Cross Country stumbles upon a Cobra slave labor camp. The captives are toiling on behalf of Cobra Commander, who needs enough money to thwart Serpentor's latest power play. The story's "maguffin" is a missing computer disk, over which a lot of fuss is stirred. Some good "mutant" character design and animation distinguishes this episode, which was written by Buzz Dixon and Michael Charles Hill. "Into Your Tent I Will Silently Creep" was the final episode of G.I. Joe, though not the final one to be telecast: Its original American air date was November 20, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Not a Ghost of a Chance Three Cobra members go on Hector Ramirez's TV show "Twenty Questions," ostensibly to clear themselves of charges that he destroyed the prototype for a new stealth bomber. Meanwhile, the Joes try to rescue the bombers' missing pilots. Their efforts -- and the ultimate unmasking of Cobra as the scoundrels that they really are -- is almost undermined by Joe team member Flint's personal demons. Written by Sharmon Di Vono, "Not a Ghost of a Chance" was first telecast in America on November 13, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide
  • Sopranos: The Complete Series

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Nov 17, 2009

    Includes:The Sopranos: Pilot (1999) The Sopranos: 46 Long (1999) The Sopranos: Meadowlands (1999) The Sopranos: Pax Soprana (1999) The Sopranos: The Legend of Tennessee Moltisanti (1999) The Sopranos: A Hit Is a Hit (1999) The Sopranos: Isabella (1999) The Sopranos: I Dream of Jeannie Cusamano (1999) The Sopranos: Nobody Knows Anything (1999) The Sopranos: Boca (1999) The Sopranos: Down Neck (1999) The Sopranos: College (1999) The Sopranos: Denial, Anger, Acceptance (1999) The Sopranos: Guy Walks Into a Psychiatrist's Office (2000) The Sopranos: Full Leather Jacket (2000) The Sopranos: Do Not Resuscitate (2000) The Sopranos: Funhouse (2000) The Sopranos: The Knight in White Satin Armor (2000) The Sopranos: House Arrest (2000) The Sopranos: Bust-Out (2000) The Sopranos: From Where to Eternity (2000) The Sopranos: D-Girl (2000) The Sopranos: Toodle-Fucking-oo (2000) The Sopranos: Commendatori (2000) The Sopranos: Big Girls Don't Cry (2000) The Sopranos: The Happy Wanderer (2000) The Sopranos: Mr. Ruggerio's Neighborhood (2001) The Sopranos: Employee of the Month (2001) The Sopranos: University (2001) The Sopranos: He Is Risen (2001) The Sopranos: Pine Barrens (2001) The Sopranos: Army of One (2001) The Sopranos: Amour Fou (2001) The Sopranos: To Save Us All From Satan's Power (2001) The Sopranos: Second Opinion (2001) The Sopranos: Another Toothpick (2001) The Sopranos: Fortunate Son (2001) The Sopranos: Proshai, Livushka (2001) The Sopranos: Eloise (2002) The Sopranos: No-Show (2002) The Sopranos: Whitecaps (2002) The Sopranos: Whoever Did This (2002) The Sopranos: Calling All Cars (2002) The Sopranos: The Strong, Silent Type (2002) The Sopranos: Christopher (2002) The Sopranos: Everybody Hurts (2002) The Sopranos: The Weight (2002) The Sopranos: Watching Too Much Television (2002) The Sopranos: For All Debts Public and Private (2002) The Sopranos: Pie-O-My (2002) The Sopranos: Mergers & Acquisitions (2002) The Sopranos: Where's Johnny (2004) The Sopranos: All Happy Families (2004) The Sopranos: Irregular Around the Margins (2004) The Sopranos: Sentimental Education (2004) The Sopranos: Marco Polo (2004) The Sopranos: The Test Dream (2004) The Sopranos: Unidentified Black Males (2004) The Sopranos: Rat Pack (2004) The Sopranos: Two Tonys (2004) The Sopranos: All Due Respect (2004) The Sopranos: Long Term Parking (2004) The Sopranos: Cold Cuts (2004) The Sopranos: In Camelot (2004) The Sopranos: Join the Club (2006) The Sopranos: The Fleshy Part of the Thigh (2006) The Sopranos: Live Free or Die (2006) The Sopranos: Johnny Cakes (2006) The Sopranos: Cold Stones (2006) The Sopranos: Moe 'n' Joe (2006) The Sopranos: The Ride (2006) The Sopranos: Luxury Lounge (2006) The Sopranos: Mr. & Mrs. John Sacrimoni Request (2006) The Sopranos: Mayham (2006) The Sopranos: Members Only (2006) The Sopranos: Kaisha (2006) The Sopranos: Kennedy and Heidi (2007) The Sopranos: Stage 5 (2007) The Sopranos: Chasing It (2007) The Sopranos: Walk Like a Man (2007) The Sopranos: Remember When (2007) The Sopranos: Soprano Home Movies (2007) The Sopranos: Made in America (2007) The Sopranos: The Second Coming (2007) The Sopranos: The Blue Comet (2007) The Sopranos: Pilot In the pilot episode of this HBO television series from executive producer David Chase, a New Jersey mob boss named Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) suffers a series of anxiety attacks. Convinced by his physician that he needs to seek therapy, Tony consults psychiatrist Dr. Jennifer Melfi (Lorraine Bracco), who begins exploring her patient's attachment to a family of ducks that have been living in his pool, but have recently departed. As signs of weakness and disclosures made to a "shrink" could have violent repercussions in Tony's secretive world of organized crime, he keeps his visits with Melfi a secret. Those in the dark at first include his wife Carmela (Edie Falco), his manipulative mother Livia (Nancy Marchand), and his scheming uncle Junior (Dominic Chianese), a member of the same crime family. In the meantime, Carmela's relationship with her and Tony's high-school age daughter Meadow (Jamie-Lynn Sigler) is becoming strained, and their son Anthony Jr. (Robert Iler) is clueless about his dad's real profession. Tony's stress increases when he learns that the restaurant of his best friend, Artie Bucco (John Ventimiglia), is to be the site of a mob murder on the orders of Junior, and that his cousin Christopher Moltisanti (Michael Imperioli), one of Tony's soldiers, is making waves with his heavy-handed tactics. Tony orders Artie's restaurant blown up to trump Junior's plans, assuming that insurance will build his friend a new establishment. A hit with audiences and television critics alike, The Sopranos was the creation of executive producer Chase, whose resumé includes stints on such lauded television programs as The Rockford Files (1974-1980), I'll Fly Away (1991-1993), and Northern Exposure (1990-1995). The Sopranos' pilot episode aired on January 10, 1999. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: 46 Long In the sophomore episode of the HBO series, mob boss Jackie Aprile (Michael Rispoli) is dying of cancer, which can only lead to a power struggle between his two top capos, Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) and Tony's own uncle, Junior (Dominic Chianese). Tony persuades his mother, Livia (Nancy Marchand) to move into a retirement community against her wishes. When a car is stolen from a teacher at the school of Tony's son, Anthony Jr. (Robert Iler), Tony sends his two top lieutenants, "Big Pussy" Bompensiero (Vincent Pastore) and Paulie Walnuts (Tony Sirico) to get the vehicle back. The incident leads to Anthony Jr.'s first suspicions about his dad's true occupation. Junior is having his own problems with the headstrong Christopher Moltisanti (Michael Imperioli), his nephew, and a lieutenant of Tony's who has hijacked some merchandise from one of his trucks. Peace is made when Christopher agrees to pay Junior tribute, but his dimwitted associate Brendan Filone (Anthony de Sando) again holds up one of Junior's trucks, this time accidentally killing the driver. Tony learns that his friend Artie Bucco (John Ventimiglia) did not have his restaurant insured, and that an explosion Tony secretly arranged has destroyed his friend financially. "46 Long" originally aired January 17, 1999. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Meadowlands Revelations mark this fourth episode of the series, involving a schoolyard fight brewing between Anthony Soprano Jr. (Robert Iler) and a bully who unexpectedly backs down. Anthony Jr. fails to understand the boy's fear, so his sister Meadow (Jamie-Lynn Sigler) explains that their father, Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini), is not really a "waste management consultant" but a New Jersey mob kingpin. After he begins having erotic dreams about his psychiatrist, Dr. Jennifer Melfi (Lorraine Bracco), Tony hires a crooked cop, Vin Makazian (John Heard) to investigate Melfi's background, and the detective accidentally ruins her romance with a lawyer. Frantic after the mock execution he suffered, Soprano soldier Christopher Moltisanti (Michael Imperioli) believes that his cousin and boss, Tony, ordered the incident because he gave Tony's daughter, Meadow, some crystal methamphetamines; however, after Christopher and his girlfriend, Adriana (Drea de Matteo), discover the corpse of his murdered friend, Brendan Filone (Anthony de Sando), he realizes that his uncle, Junior (Dominic Chianese), ordered the slaying in retaliation for a botched truck hijacking. Exacerbated by Junior's bloodthirsty soldier, Mikey (Al Sapienza), tensions rise between Tony and Junior when their boss and head of the family, Jackie Aprile (Michael Rispoli), passes away from cancer. Tony is left to decide whether he will make a play for the top job in the family or concede control to his uncle. "Meadowlands" first aired on January 31, 1999. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Pax Soprana The sixth episode of the HBO mob series finds New Jersey crime boss Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) deciding to do the noble thing and cede control of the family to his rival and uncle, Junior (Dominic Chianese), much to everyone's surprise and dismay. In reality, Tony is maintaining control of the family. With the agreement of the other families in the tri-state area, Junior is being set up as a frontman without his knowledge. Immediately, however, Junior causes trouble by ordering tribute to be paid by Tony's top lieutenants, including a long-time family advisor, Hesh Rabkin (Jerry Adler). Tony shocks his psychiatrist, Dr. Jennifer Melfi (Lorraine Bracco), by declaring that he's falling in love with her during a session, and then kisses her. Junior learns that his tailor's grandson committed suicide because of a crippling drug addiction and orders two of his men to throw the drug dealer off a bridge in retaliation. Tony's medication is causing his sex drive to become nonexistent, much to the chagrin of both his wife Carmela (Edie Falco) and his mistress. At a dinner celebration, the FBI conducts surveillance on the Sopranos, aware that Tony is still the real power behind the criminal organization. "Pax Soprana" first aired on Valentine's Day, February 14, 1999. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: The Legend of Tennessee Moltisanti Legal troubles come to a boil in the eighth episode of the hit HBO series. Mob soldier Christopher Moltisanti (Michael Imperioli) is enraged that he's not receiving the same publicity that other Mafia soldiers are enjoying due to the current round of federal indictments that are being handed down and covered extensively in the press. On edge and ready to explode, Christopher gets into an altercation with a bakery employee and shoots the man's toe off. In the meantime, psychiatrist Jennifer Melfi (Lorraine Bracco) confesses to her son and ex-husband that she is counseling a stressed-out mobster, New Jersey crime kingpin Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini), and they become concerned about her safety. At a wedding, the Soprano family members learn that they are about to be indicted by the FBI, which has become interested in their activities again since the death of the organization's one-time godfather. Tony and his wife, Carmela (Edie Falco), hurry home to conceal evidence not a moment too soon, as federal agents soon arrive with warrants and begin searching the premises. When the story hits the news, Christopher is pleased and relieved to be mentioned as an important family associate. Episode 8 aired on February 28, 1999. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: A Hit Is a Hit A mob boss finds he can't escape his true identity, while his cousin learns that the music industry is as crooked as organized crime in the tenth episode of the HBO series. New Jersey Mafia chieftain Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) is delighted to receive an invitation to play golf with his well-to-do neighbor, Cusamano, at his exclusive country club. Happy to socialize with non-mobsters for once, Tony quickly realizes that Cusamano has extended the invitation simply to impress his buddies with his powerful crime boss pal. Tony's cousin and soldier Christopher Moltisanti (Michael Imperioli) and his girlfriend Adriana (Drea de Matteo) meet Massive Genius, a rap star with a financial grudge against Soprano family advisor Hesh (Jerry Adler). Genius is immediately attracted to Adriana and makes a deal with Christopher: in exchange for Christopher setting up a meeting between Genius and Hesh, the musician agrees to consider signing a band that Adriana wants to represent, but it becomes clear that Genius is only interested in Adriana sexually. Meanwhile, Tony gets even with Cusamano by asking him to "hold on" to a package wrapped in plain brown paper, sending his neighbor into a panic over the possibly illegal narcotic contents. Episode 10 first aired March 14, 1999. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Isabella A fantasy woman leads to a therapeutic breakthrough for a mob chieftain, as his family crumbles around him in the penultimate episode of the HBO series' freshman season. Briefly confined to his bed by depression, New Jersey Mafia boss Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) begins having hallucinogenic dreams about a beautiful neighbor named Isabella, who he believes to be a foreign exchange student living at his neighbor Cusamano's house. After Tony's cousin and soldier Christopher Moltisanti (Michael Imperioli) unwittingly prevents a first hit attempt on Tony, a pair of assassins nearly manage to kill the crime boss, but Tony gets away with only minor wounds. While he's recovering at the hospital, Tony is visited by the FBI, who tries in vain to recruit him as a federal witness. Tony also receives visits from his lieutenants, who vow revenge, and his uncle Junior (Dominic Chianese), whom he correctly suspects ordered the botched slaying. Tony discovers that there is no Isabella and that the gorgeous girl he envisioned suckling a baby was a figment of his imagination. While consulting with his psychiatrist, Dr. Jennifer Melfi (Lorraine Bracco), to see if she's the one who leaked information about him, Tony comes to the conclusion that his dreams about Isabella are significantly related to his lack of childhood nurturing and mothering. Isabella aired March 29, 1999. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: I Dream of Jeannie Cusamano The final episode of the HBO crime series' first season contains several startling plot twists. After she suffers a disorienting episode, Livia Soprano (Nancy Marchand), the manipulative mother of a powerful New Jersey crime boss, is moved to the nursing wing of her retirement home. Her son Tony (James Gandolfini) doesn't want to face the possibility, raised by his therapist Dr. Jennifer Melfi (Lorraine Bracco), that his own mother may have been in on an assassination attempt that nearly took his life. Later, however, the FBI plays tapes of Livia's conversations with Tony's uncle and family rival, Junior (Dominic Chianese), which proves she knew about the attempt and that Junior ordered it. Visiting with Livia, Tony's friend Artie Bucco (John Ventimiglia) discovers Tony's role in the destruction of his restaurant and confronts Tony with a shotgun, but Tony is able to convince his friend that Livia is losing her mind. Tony's cousin and muscle man Christopher Moltisanti (Michael Imperioli) and Soprano family lieutenant Paulie Walnuts (Tony Sirico) murder Junior's top soldier, Mikey (Al Sapienza), while he's out jogging. Before Tony can also rub out his uncle, Junior and his men are arrested by the Feds on racketeering charges. Tony informs Dr. Melfi that a gang war could be brewing, putting her life in danger, and that she should leave town for a while. Livia has a stroke, and an incensed Tony confronts her about her role in the attempt on his life as she is wheeled away. "I Dream of Jeannie Cusamano" first aired on April 4, 1999. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Nobody Knows Anything Looming betrayals within a mob family cloud the horizon in this episode of the popular HBO crime series. Crooked police officer Vin Mazakian (John Heard) tells New Jersey crime boss Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) that his best friend and trusted lieutenant Big Pussy Bompenseiro (Vincent Pastore), who was arrested by the feds, may have turned and could be working as an informant. Although he's incredulous, Tony orders another of his men, Paulie Walnuts (Tony Sirico) to find the truth. Tony cautions Paulie not to kill their old friend until he's absolutely certain that he's a snitch, as it's possible Mazakian is framing Pussy to get out of his gambling debts. Before Tony can learn more, Mazakian is arrested in a sting operation and, his career in tatters, commits suicide as Paulie's plan to get Pussy to disrobe at a steam bath to see if he's wearing a wire fails. At the same time, Tony's uncle and rival within the family, Junior (Dominic Chianese) orders a hit on Tony, giving the bloody assignment to his top soldier Mikey (Al Sapienza), who tells his wife he's moving up in the family. After the incident at the steam bath, Pussy disappears. This episode first aired March 21, 1999. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Boca An intimate sexual act triggers further tension between two crime bosses in this episode of the HBO series. New Jersey mob boss Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) ridicules his uncle and fellow mobster Junior (Dominic Chianese) on the golf course. Tony has heard about Junior's oral sex skills with his girlfriend, Bobbi, who has been gabbing to her friends about Junior's prowess while the two were on a vacation in Boca Raton, FL. In retaliation, Junior smashes a lemon meringue pie in Bobbi's face, breaking their 16-year relationship. He also tells his vicious top soldier, Mikey (Al Sapienza), a secret he's been keeping that he recently learned from his sister-in-law, Livia (Nancy Marchand): her son, Tony, is compromising family security by seeing a psychiatrist. Meanwhile, Tony and his friends make plans to convince their daughters' talented soccer coach not to accept a lucrative college job, until they learn that the coach has been sleeping with one of his underage players, a friend of Tony's daughter, Meadow (Jamie-Lynn Sigler). They take steps to teach the coach a lesson he'll never forget. "Boca" was first shown on March 7, 1999. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Down Neck In this domestic episode of the hit HBO series, Anthony Soprano Jr. (Robert Iler), the son of a powerful New Jersey crime boss, gets suspended from school for stealing sacramental wine from the chapel. The school psychologist summons the boy's parents, mob capo Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) and his wife, Carmela (Edie Falco), for a meeting at which Anthony Jr. is diagnosed with Attention Deficit Disorder. Tony is troubled by his son's actions and reflects on his own childhood with his cruelly controlling mother, Livia (Nancy Marchand), and his mobster father. Although Tony expresses concern to his psychiatrist, Dr. Jennifer Melfi (Lorraine Bracco), that his son may end up living the same life of crime he does, he and Carmela refuse to accept the judgment of their son's school that the boy might need special education. Forced to visit Livia in her retirement home everyday, Anthony Jr. tells his grandmother about the incident and, also, accidentally reveals that his father is consulting a psychiatrist, spilling a very dangerous family secret to the shrewd and manipulative Livia. Down Neck aired on February 21, 1999. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: College Painful truths are revealed in the popular HBO series' standout fifth episode. New Jersey crime boss Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) escorts his daughter, Meadow (Jamie-Lynn Sigler), on visits to several colleges in New England. As Tony and Meadow travel, he discusses his occupation with her openly for the first time. Although he's reluctant to do so, it has become obvious that Meadow and her younger brother, Anthony Jr. (Robert Iler), are aware of their father's criminal career. Stopping in a small Maine town, Tony spots a one-time snitch against the family named Fabian Petrulio, who long ago disappeared into the federal witness protection program. Between Meadow's appointments at various schools, Tony resolves to murder Fabian. Although Tony has confessed, to the delight of his wife Carmela (Edie Falco), that he is in therapy, she is unaware that his doctor is an attractive Italian-American woman, Dr. Jennifer Melfi (Lorraine Bracco), to whom Tony has become drawn sexually. Home with the flu, Carmela becomes furious when she receives a call from Melfi about a scheduling conflict. Confiding her marital frustrations to her movie-loving friend Father Phil, Carmela's relationship with the priest threatens to become romantic when Phil decides to spend the night on the couch. Back in Maine, Tony learns that Petrulio now goes by the name "Fred Peters." Convinced he's got the right man, Tony plots his revenge on Petrulio. "College" first aired on February 7, 1999. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Denial, Anger, Acceptance In the series' third episode, a crime family confronts the possibility of a future power struggle. Meadow Soprano (Jamie-Lynn Sigler), the daughter of New Jersey mob boss Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini), takes crystal methamphetamines with a friend in order to help them study for the SATs. Tony visits his dying Mafia superior, Jackie Aprile (Michael Rispoli), in the hospital and presents him with a gift: a hooker dressed as a nurse. Mikey Palmice (Al Sapienza), the top lieutenant of Tony's rival and uncle, Junior (Dominic Chianese), is convinced that Tony will make a grab for top boss after Jackie's death, and he begins to convince Junior that his nephew should be whacked. Tony, his henchman Paulie Walnuts (Tony Sirico), and another Soprano lieutenant, Silvio Dante (Steven Van Zandt), deal with a Hasidic family of motel owners who refuse to pay protection money. After hiring family friends Artie Bucco (John Ventimiglia) and his wife Charmaine (Kathrine Narducci) to cater a party, Tony's wife, Carmela (Edie Falco), learns that her husband slept with Charmaine in high school. Soprano associate Christopher Moltisanti (Michael Imperioli) tries to make a botched truck hijacking right by returning stolen goods to Junior, but the mob capo still orders Christopher's pal, Brendan Filone (Anthony de Sando), murdered and Christopher to be threatened. Airing on January 24, 1999, "Denial, Anger, Acceptance" was directed by independent feature filmmaker Nick Gomez (New Jersey Drive, Illtown). ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Guy Walks Into a Psychiatrist's Office In the second-season premiere of this original HBO series, Mob boss Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) adjusts to some changes in both his families in the wake of his mother's betrayal and a legal crackdown by federal law enforcement. Tony's also dealing with the sudden reappearance of his sister Janice (Aida Turturro), a free spirit going by the Hindu name "Parvati," who's really a greedy schemer in the finest Soprano tradition. Claiming she's there to care for their hospitalized mother Livia (Nancy Marchand), Janice is angling to get her mother's house (or the proceeds from its sales) when Livia dies. Tony refuses to see Livia, who's "dead" as far as he's concerned and not invited to a family barbecue. Tony's Uncle Junior (Dominic Chianese) is in jail and Tony orders a hit on Philly, one of Junior's men, because Philly's blabbing about Tony's therapy. But Tony's psychotherapist Dr. Jennifer Melfi (Lorraine Bracco), who's been reduced to hiding out and seeing patients in a motel room, refuses to treat her star patient despite his renewed panic attacks, telling him off at a diner. Nephew Christopher Moltisanti (Michael Imperioli) expands into a new business venture involving a scam stock brokerage called Webistics. Meanwhile Big Pussy (Vincent Pastore) reappears, claiming to have undergone rehab in Puerto Rico. "Guy Walks Into a Psychiatrist's Office" premiered January 16, 2000. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Full Leather Jacket A violent turn of events threatens the good fortunes of the Soprano family in this episode of the cable television series. Concerned that her daughter, Meadow (Jamie-Lynn Sigler), could end up attending a college thousands of miles away, Carmela Soprano (Edie Falco) asks her neighbor, Jean Cusamano (Saundra Santiago), for a favor. It seems that Jean's twin sister, Joan (also played by Santiago), a successful lawyer, is a graduate of Georgetown University and serves in an influential alum position. Carmela asks if Joan would write a recommendation for Meadow, but Joan's answer is no. Determined and more than a little peeved, Carmela bakes a ricotta pie and shows up at Joan's office, making it clear that the recommendation is an offer Joan can't refuse. Carmela's husband, mob boss Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini), is dealing with his own headache, his lieutenant Richie Aprile (David Proval), who is bucking his order to build a wheelchair access ramp at the home of pizzeria owner Beansie (Paul Herman), whom Richie is responsible for injuring. Richie caves in after a talk with Tony's Uncle Junior (Dominic Chianese) and even offers Tony his lucky leather jacket, a relic from the 1970s that Tony promptly gives to his maid's immigrant husband, enraging Richie. Deciding to quit taking drugs and give up his dreams of a life in the movie business, Soprano family lieutenant Christopher Moltisanti (Michael Imperioli) asks his girlfriend, Adriana (Drea de Matteo), to marry him. The couple's joy is short-lived, as Christopher's two partners in crime, Matt Bevilaqua (Lillo Brancato Jr.) and Sean Gismonte (Chris Tardio), decide to move up the mob ladder by murdering Christopher, gunning him down in a diner parking lot. Sean is killed in the attack, and Matt goes on the run after Richie refuses to help him. "Full Leather Jacket" originally aired March 5, 2000. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Do Not Resuscitate New Jersey mob boss Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) proves himself a cagey leader in this episode of the cable TV series. When Tony's Uncle Junior (Dominic Chianese) is released from jail under house arrest due to a heart condition, Tony meets with him at the office of Junior's doctor, which cannot be wire-tapped by the government due to doctor-patient confidentiality laws. Tony allows Junior to earn a token five percent of his income and retain the title of "boss." Tony's still the one in charge, however, as he proves when he negotiates an end to a labor strike in a surprising way profitable both for him and a black community activist. Although Junior is nursing a serious grudge against his nephew, it's Tony he turns to when he injures himself in a bathtub fall. Janice (Aida Turturro) continues to worm her way back into the Soprano family by befriending her niece, Meadow (Jamie-Lynn Sigler), who gets her driver's license, and buttering up her mother, Livia (Nancy Marchand). Livia and Janice's new closeness is short-lived, however, because Tony's son, Anthony Jr. (Robert Iler), innocently spills the beans about his father and Janice discussing a "DNR" order. During a trip to the doctor's office for a steroid injection to alleviate back pain, Soprano family soldier Big Pussy (Vincent Pastore) is revealed to be working with FBI agent Skip Lipari (Louis Lombardi), but not everything Big P tells the federal agent is true, so who's playing who? "Do Not Resuscitate" first aired January 23, 2000. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Funhouse A pair of graduations and a goodbye to an old friend wrap up the second season of the popular HBO series. New Jersey Mafia boss Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) is flush with a run of financial success thanks to several recent schemes, including big payoffs from a calling-card scam. He buys his wife, Carmela (Edie Falco), a new sable coat, and gives plane tickets to Arizona to his mother, Livia (Nancy Marchand), and her sister. Later, a bad dish at an Indian restaurant gives Tony serious food poisoning, leading to a series of disturbing dreams. In one of them, his friend, Pussy (Vincent Pastore), appears in the form of a frozen fish to announce that he's a FBI informant and that Tony has known all along. Tony begins to recover, determined to learn the truth about Pussy, whom he's long suspected of colluding with the feds. Visiting Pussy's home, Tony feigns continued illness and discovers hidden sound recording equipment and audiotapes. Tony, along with his top captains Silvio Dante (Steve Van Zandt) and Paulie Walnuts (Tony Sirico) pretends to take Pussy on a test drive of a new powerboat, and force a confession from their old friend once they're out to sea. Pussy admits his guilt, but adds that most of the information he fed the government was false. Tony, Paulie, and Silvio murder Pussy and dump his body into the ocean. Returning home to continue preparations for the high school graduation party of his daughter ,Meadow (Jamie-Lynn Sigler), Tony receives a call from his mother. It seems the Arizona plane tickets were stolen during an earlier bankruptcy bust-out, and Livia has been detained. It's not long before law enforcement officers show up at the Soprano resident to arrest Tony. He's quickly bailed out by his lawyer, and Tony attends a therapy session with Dr. Melfi (Lorraine Bracco), who finally admits to Tony that she's frightened of him. At his daughter's graduation celebration, Tony tells his lieutenant, Christopher Moltisanti (Michael Imperioli), that he's about to graduate as well, to being a "made man" in the Mob. "Funhouse" first aired April 9, 2000. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: The Knight in White Satin Armor A mob boss's biggest personnel problem is resolved in an unexpected fashion in this penultimate episode of the cable television series' second season. Mob chieftain Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) has been trying to break off his long-running affair with Irina (Oksana Babiy), but the possessive Russian mistress tries to commit suicide with an overdose of pills. Tony is finally forced to send his captain, Silvio Dante (Steve Van Zandt) to visit Irina with a dose of wise advice and an envelope containing 75 thousand dollars. Tony's problems with his enforcer, Richie Aprile (David Proval), are coming to a head because Richie is refusing to follow Tony's order to stop selling drugs on his trash-hauling routes. Now Richie's trying to muscle into other capos' territories and scheming to kill Tony. Trying to persuade Tony's uncle, Junior (Dominic Chianese), to join him, the erratic and hot-tempered Richie finds Junior reluctant. Tony and his wife, Carmela (Edie Falco), host an engagement party for Richie and Tony's sister, Janice (Aida Turturro). Electing to remain loyal to Tony, Junior tips his nephew off about Richie's homicidal plans and receives an increase in his percentage from a grateful Tony. Tony orders Silvio to whack Richie, but before Silvio can carry out the hit, Richie and Janice get into a violent domestic quarrel, and Janice shoots Richie twice at point-blank range. Soprano lieutenants Christopher Moltisanti (Michael Imperioli) and Furio Giunta (Federico Castelluccio) get rid of Richie's corpse at the butcher shop, while Tony puts Janice on a bus back to Seattle, concluding, "All in all, it's been a good visit." Soprano family solider Big Pussy (Vincent Pastore) seems to be having a mental meltdown due to the stress of being a government informant. Acting as if he thinks he's a junior G-man, Pussy stakes out and tails Christopher on an illegal mission to highjack a truckload of "Pokemon" cards but runs down an innocent bicyclist instead. "The Knight in White Satin Armor" first aired April 2, 2000. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: House Arrest A mob boss tries to reform for appearances' sake in this episode of the TV cable series that begins heating up several story lines in anticipation of the second season finale. Having narrowly avoided prosecution in a murder case, New Jersey Mafia don Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) is advised by his lawyer to begin keeping regular office hours at his legitimate business, a waste management company called Barone Brothers Sanitation. A 9-5 desk job drives Tony to distraction, however, and even sexual escapades with a secretary don't seem to alleviate his increased stress, which causes a rash on his arm and another blackout at an annual golf outing for waste haulers. Wary of increased attention from the FBI, Tony orders his brother-in-law to tell Richie Aprile (David Proval) to stop selling cocaine on his garbage routes, causing even more bad blood between them. Uncle Junior (Dominic Chianese), who's partnered with Richie in the narcotics scheme and chafing under house arrest, begins to enjoy the company of Catherine Romano (Mary Louise Wilson), a police captain's widow he knew in his youth. Still drinking vodka before her sessions with Tony, Dr. Melfi (Lorraine Bracco) feels duty-bound to treat the mobster, even though her patient wants to quit therapy. After an altercation with a smoker at a restaurant embarrasses her son, Melfi receives a prescription for Luvox, an obsessive-compulsive disorder medication, from her psychiatrist, Dr. Kupferberg (Peter Bogdanovich). "House Arrest" first aired March 26, 2000. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Bust-Out A witness could bring an organized crime family crashing down in this episode of the HBO television series created by David Chase. Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) is distressed to learn that a witness has identified him as being in the area where a traitorous mob lieutenant was murdered. He visits his lawyer, Neil Mink (David Margulies), to discuss a strategy of stalling the feds, and delivers a bag of cash, Tony's rainy day fund for his wife and kids should he be arrested. Tony's also upset when his son, Anthony Jr. (Robert Iler), prefers to hang out with his friends at the mall rather than spend time with his dad, but Tony then promptly forgets his son's swim meet. After a meeting with Tony, Soprano family muscle Richie Aprile (David Proval) complains to Tony's Uncle Junior (Dominic Chianese) about the shoddy treatment they're both getting. Junior warns Richie about the treacherous Janice (Aida Turturro), who's letting Richie hold a gun to her head during sex. As payment for the massive gambling debt of his old pal, Davey Scatino (Robert Patrick), Tony and his crew take over Davey's outdoor store, running up the limit on all of Davey's lines of credit, intending to sell the merchandise on the street and bankrupt the business. A depressed Davey sleeps in a tent in his store, never returning home and contemplating suicide. Meanwhile, Pussy (Vincent Pastore) gives the FBI a list of investors in the Webistics scam and Tony's wife, Carmela (Edie Falco), has a crush on virile, widowed wallpaper hanger Vic Musto (Joe Penny), Davey's brother-in-law. Their flirtation threatens to become something more, but then Vic meets Davey for lunch and learns that Carmela's husband is a mob kingpin who has ruined Davey's family. Vic offers to pay for the college tuition of his nephew and breaks off his friendship with Carmela, sending an assistant to finish the wallpaper job. Tony learns that the witness against him learned of his identity and is now refusing to testify. The mob boss is so elated, he walks out of a therapy session with Dr. Melfi (Lorraine Bracco). His daughter, Meadow (Jamie-Lynn Sigler), learns that she's been accepted at some top colleges, giving the family cause for celebration. "Bust-Out," which was called "Deus Ex Machina" until a last-minute title change, originally aired March 19, 2000. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: From Where to Eternity Series co-star Michael Imperioli, who also wrote the feature film Summer of Sam (1999), penned the script for this episode of the popular pay-television drama. Shot several times in the previous episode, Soprano family lieutenant Christopher Moltisanti (Imperioli) clings to life in a hospital and has an out-of-body experience that brings him into contact with his ghosts of his late father and a slain former associate, Mikey Palmice, in the afterlife. Shaken up by Christopher's account of his supernatural journey, Paulie Walnuts (Tony Sirico) visits a psychic, a priest, and even Palmice's widow, convinced he'll go to Hell when he dies. Mafia boss Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) receives a tip regarding the whereabouts of Matt Bevilaqua (Lillo Brancato Jr.), one of the gunmen who shot Christopher, and pays Matt a lethal visit with Big Pussy (Vincent Pastore), who's forced to commit murder despite being a federal informant. Hearing about the illegitimate child borne by another mobster's mistress, Carmela (Edie Falco) urges her husband Tony to get a vasectomy, as she's aware of his affair with a Russian girl, Irina (Oksana Babiy). Tony insists the affair is over, but Carmela is highly skeptical. Janice (Aida Turturro) continues to pressure her boyfriend, Richie Aprile (David Proval), to move against her brother Tony. Tony blows up at his son, Anthony Jr. (Robert Iler), and then tries to rectify the situation by spending time with him. Tony also attempts to be a good husband; he tells Carmela he'll get a vasectomy, but she tells Tony she's changed her mind and may want another child. Dr. Melfi (Lorraine Bracco) confesses during a visit with her psychiatrist Dr. Kupferberg (Peter Bogdanovich) that she has made an unholy alliance with her notorious client and that she's becoming increasingly dependent upon alcohol and pills. "From Where to Eternity" first aired on March 12, 2000. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: D-Girl Movie stars Jon Favreau, Sandra Bernhard, and Janeane Garofalo make cameo appearances as themselves in this episode of the hit HBO series that finds a Mafia wiseguy flirting with Hollywood. Mob lieutenant Christopher Moltisanti (Michael Imperioli), who abandoned the screenplay he was secretly writing, finds himself bitten by the show business bug once again when he meets the beautiful Amy (Alicia Witt), a development executive working on a new film with actor Jon Favreau. Christopher and Favreau meet, and the actor appropriates some of Christopher's real-life crime anecdotes for a script. Despite the fact that Amy is his cousin's girlfriend, Christopher sleeps with her. In the Soprano household, Anthony Jr. (Robert Iler) is causing his parents grief with his new apathy. After flunking most of his classes, he gets into a car accident and explains to his parents, Tony (James Gandolfini) and Carmela (Edie Falco), that he's discovered Existentialsim, and that life is absurd and meaningless. A visit with his grandmother, Livia (Nancy Marchand), is no help, as her world view is even darker and more depressing. At his confirmation party, Anthony is caught smoking pot, so his sponsor Big Pussy (Vincent Pastore), explains to Anthony that his father is a "stand-up guy," despite the fact that Big P is betraying Tony and is reluctantly wearing a wire so the Feds can record his conversations. Pussy ends up weeping in the bathroom while his FBI contact Skip (Louis Lombardi) listens in. Informed by a jealous Adriana (Drea de Matteo) that her boyfriend Christopher is dreaming of Hollywood again, Tony delivers an ultimatum to his lieutenant at the party, forcing him to choose between the movies the mob. "D-Girl" originally aired February 27, 2000. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Toodle-Fucking-oo A lethal new character joins the Soprano family in this episode of the original cable series, directed by Lee Tamhori. Mob boss Anthony Soprano (James Gandolfini) receives a call from the police, but it's not his illegal activities they're concerned with; his daughter Meadow (Jamie-Lynn Sigler) has thrown a party at the unoccupied house of Tony's mother, Livia (Nancy Marchand), and one of her teenage friends has overdosed on drugs. Tony and his wife, Carmela (Edie Falco), feel powerless to control their daughter, and give her only a token punishment, but Carmela is infuriated when Tony's sister, Janice (Aida Turturro), attempts to intervene with some unwanted child-rearing advice. Richie Aprile (David Proval), the hair-trigger-tempered brother of deceased boss Jackie Aprile, is released from prison after ten years, embittered over his loss of power. He pushes for the position and money he feels rightfully belong to him, but Tony urges Richie to be patient. Although he's indebted to Richie, pizza shop owner Beansie (Paul Herman) refuses to knuckle under and pay tribute, so Richie viciously runs over him in a parking lot, then backs up over Beansie again, crippling his one-time friend. Richie struggles with his inner demons at yoga class, where he runs into Janice, a former flame. Richie seeks to stoke the fires of romance with Janice again by visiting her and her mother, Livia (Nancy Marchand), at the hospital. Tony's cold to Dr. Melfi (Lorraine Bracco) when they bump into each other at a restaurant, and Melfi is haunted by her cheery "Toodle-oo" to the powerful mob boss. "Toodle-Fucking-oo" originally aired January 30, 2000. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Commendatori This episode of the original cable TV series was shot on-location in Italy. New Jersey mob boss Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) travels with his top lieutenants, Paulie Walnuts (Tony Sirico) and Christopher Moltisanti (Michael Imperioli), to Naples, where he intends to negotiate a lucrative new deal for the car-jacking operation he's taken over from his Uncle Junior (Dominic Chianese). While Paulie attempts to ingratiate himself with the locals with little success, Christopher holes up in his hotel room with Tanno (Giuseppe Zeno), a new acquaintance, on a drug-addled bender that lasts the entire trip. Tony discovers that his distant relative Don Zi Vittorio (Vittorio Duse) has become senile, and that Zi's voluptuous, intelligent daughter, Annalisa (Sofia Milos), is the true boss. Tony is powerfully attracted to Annalisa, who reminds him of Dr. Melfi (Lorraine Bracco), but he has a difficult time negotiating business with a woman. They agree on a price for the stolen cars and Tony recruits one of Annalisa's most valuable men, Furio Giunta (Federico Castelluccio), to be his new enforcer. Back at home in the U.S., Angie Bompensiero (Toni Kalem) confesses to Carmela Soprano (Edie Falco) that she's unhappy in her marriage to Pussy (Vincent Pastore) and wants out, but Carmela, already questioning her marriage to Tony, urges Angie to stick with her husband. Spotted by an old acquaintance while meeting with his FBI contact, Pussy is later forced to murder his friend with a hammer. "Commendatori" aired Feburary 6, 2000. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Big Girls Don't Cry In this episode of the popular cable TV series, mob chief Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) returns to therapy, a new lieutenant makes a powerful impression, and a legendary director tries his hand at acting in a multi-episode story arc. Tony reorganizes his crew, promoting Silvio Dante (Steve Van Zandt) and Paulie Walnuts (Tony Sirico) to share an underboss role, while leaving Big Pussy (Vincent Pastore) at the same level as Christopher (Michael Imperioli) and Furio (Federico Castelluccio). This infuriates Pussy, who becomes less reluctant to share information with the FBI, while Furio, now working for Artie Bucco (John Ventimiglia) as a mozzarella maker, is ordered to lean on the owner of a whorehouse, whose delinquent payments are Christopher's responsibility. Christopher, however, is wrapped up in an acting class given to him as a gift by his girlfriend, Adriana (Drea de Matteo). Tony, while he should be happy that he's not under indictment and business is booming, is having fits and tantrums. It's partly the stress of discovering that the renewed romance between his sister, Janice (Aida Turturro), and Richie Aprile (David Proval) is becoming serious, so Tony tries to talk with his counsel, Hesh Rabkin (Jerry Adler), who's of little help. Hesh does reveal, however, that Tony's father also suffered from blackouts. Dr. Melfi (Lorraine Bracco) has been seeing a therapist of her own, Dr. Elliott Kupferberg (Peter Bogdanovich), to whom she reveals her guilt over refusing to treat Tony. Although Kupferberg advises against it, Melfi calls Tony to offer her services, which Tony at first gruffly refuses. Tony relents and appears for his appointment, re-starting his sessions in an effort to gain "total control." "Big Girls Don't Cry" first aired February 13, 2000. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: The Happy Wanderer Frank Sinatra Jr. provides an amusing cameo as himself in this episode of the hit television series. Mob boss Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) tells his therapist, Dr. Jennifer Melfi (Lorraine Bracco), of his anger at all the "happy wanderers" in the world, those without the cares and concerns he suffers. One responsibility that Tony's looking forward to, however, is control of the "executive game," a poker game for high rollers that he's now inherited from Uncle Junior (Dominic Chianese). At a funeral, Tony is forced to deal with the presence of his estranged mother, Livia (Nancy Marchand), who's escorted by Janice (Aida Turturro) and her lover, Richie Aprile (David Proval). Janice is pressuring Richie to stand up to her brother and claim what's rightfully his -- namely, control of the mob family. Against his better judgement, Tony allows his old friend and local sporting goods store owner Davey Scatino (Robert Patrick) into the executive game, despite the fact that Davey's gambling problems have been causing trouble with Richie to the tune of eight grand. Davey loses another 45,000 dollars and tries to convince Soprano friend and restaurant owner Artie Bucco (John Ventimiglia) to loan him the cash to pay Tony and Richie, but Artie can't help. Junior reveals a family secret to Tony about a feeble-minded uncle he never knew he had, and Tony's daughter, Meadow (Jamie-Lynn Sigler), encounters a problem with her classmate Eric when his sport utility vehicle ends up in Soprano hands. "The Happy Wanderer" first aired on February 20, 2000. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Mr. Ruggerio's Neighborhood The third season of the popular HBO crime series opens with the FBI trying to devise a method of bugging the home of New Jersey mob boss Anthony Soprano (James Gandolfini). In the meantime, Tony's daughter Meadow (Jamie-Lynn Sigler) adjusts to life as a freshman at Columbia University, his wife Carmela (Edie Falco) takes tennis lessons, and his son Anthony Jr. (Robert Iler) is more concerned about his skateboard and cigarettes than schoolwork. Tony is also worried about Patsy Parisi (Dan Grimaldi), twin brother of the slain Philly, who was murdered on Tony's orders. His erratic behavior and heavy drinking seem an indication that Patsy knows who's responsible for his brother's death, causing Tony and his lieutenants to keep a close watch on the embittered soldier. "Mr. Ruggerio's Neighborhood" was written by series creator David Chase. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Employee of the Month A violent sexual assault followed by justice aborted due to a legal technicality leaves Dr. Melfi (Lorraine Bracco) flirting with the idea of using her mob connection to get revenge in this powerful episode of the cable crime drama. When she's raped in the stairwell of her office building, Dr. Melfi expects the attacker to be prosecuted, but an improper police procedure results in the rapist getting off. After she recognizes her rapist at a fast food restaurant where he works, she considers telling her mob boss client Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) about the incident, knowing he'll exact retribution, but the therapist remains silent. In the meantime, Tony deals with his uppity subordinate, Ralph Cifaretto (Joe Pantoliano), by promoting one of Ralph's garbage business associates in his stead, and Tony's sister, Janice (Aida Turturro), has a violent run-in with Russian gangsters over a stolen prosthetic leg. Some good news comes Tony's way when he learns of a new 25-million-dollar waterfront project coming into his territory, but the appearance of new neighbor Johnny Sack (Vincent Curatola), a powerful New York crime boss, is a cause for concern. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: University The violence toward women characteristic of this hit cable drama's third season continues with shocking brutality in this heartbreaking episode. New Jersey mob boss Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) resists the efforts of one of his needy young go-go dancers, Tracee (Ariel Kiley), to become "friends." He's got enough problems at home with his own daughter, Meadow (Jamie-Lynn Sigler), who has been giving him the silent treatment over her father's prejudice toward her mixed-race boyfriend. When the boyfriend casually dumps Meadow, however, she's furious, hurling invective at her family and slamming doors. Meanwhile, Tracee has become pregnant with the child of Tony's garbage business underling, Ralph Cifaretto (Joe Pantoliano), who reacts with a typically uncaring attitude. When Tracee insults Ralph in front of his friends and business partners, he meets her outside Tony's strip club and brutally beats her to death. Tony reacts violently, attacking Ralph and violating the code of la cosa nostra. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: He Is Risen Accomplished character actress Annabella Sciorra joins the cast of this popular crime series. As Thanksgiving approaches, New Jersey mob boss Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) deals with the fallout of his beating his garbage business subordinate Ralph Cifaretto (Joe Pantoliano). A violation of the Mafia code, Tony's now obliged to either kill Ralph or apologize, but finds himself loathe to do either -- and instead embarks on a torrid affair with a beautiful but troubled Mercedes Benz dealership sales rep, Gloria Trillo (Sciorra). In the meantime, Tony's daughter Meadow (Jamie-Lynn Sigler) has begun dating shiftless Jackie Aprile Jr. (Jason Cerbone), the wannabe gangster son of Tony's one-time boss. While Jackie Jr.'s mother (Sharon Angela) is thrilled at the union, Tony and his wife Carmela (Edie Falco) are less enthused about the young man's questionable prospects. The holidays bring resolution to at least one of Tony's problems: when a Soprano family crew boss dies unexpectedly, Tony's able to heal the rift with Ralph by promoting him to captain, a position of authority Cifaretto has long craved. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Pine Barrens Elements of the darkly humorous Fargo (1996) are recalled in this Emmy-nominated episode directed by one of that classic film's stars, Steve Buscemi. A simple collection from a Russian goes awry when he and Soprano family mobster Paulie Walnuts (Tony Sirico) exchange words, then blows. Determining that the desolate Pine Barrens of Southern New Jersey are the perfect dumping grounds for the Russian's body, Paulie drags soldier Christopher Moltisanti (Michael Imperioli) with him, promising a night in Atlantic City once the corpse has been disposed of. Things don't unfold as planned, however; their victim isn't dead and turns out to be a former Army commando who assaults them, then escapes. Disoriented, Paulie and Christopher can't find their way back to the car and end up spending a frozen night in the woods. Meantime, the Mafia organization's boss Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) learns that his new lover Gloria Trillo (Annabella Sciorra) has an unstable, violent streak, and his daughter Meadow (Jamie-Lynn Sigler) sees another side of her boyfriend Jackie Aprile Jr. (Jason Cerbone). ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Army of One The third season of the hit HBO crime series comes to a close in this memorable episode. After he brokers a peace agreement between two of his captains, Ralph Cifaretto (Joe Pantoliano) and Paulie Walnuts (Tony Sirico), New Jersey mob boss Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) must handle a domestic crisis. It seems his son Anthony Jr. (Robert Iler) has been expelled from his high school for cheating on a math test. Enraged, Tony tells his wife Carmela (Edie Falco) that their only option is military school, but she fights her husband on the decision. In hiding after a botched robbery attempt on some made men, Jackie Aprile Jr. (Jason Cerbone) is gunned down on the orders of Ralph, and the young man's funeral leaves his ex-girlfriend Meadow Soprano (Jamie-Lynn Sigler) distraught. After seeing Jackie in his coffin, Carmela reconsiders Anthony Jr.'s fate, but then the boy blacks out while trying on his new school uniform, suffering from the same anxiety-produced seizures as his father, rendering him unfit for duty. At a wake for Jackie, a frustrated Paulie forges a new alliance with rival mob boss Johnny Sack (Vincent Curatola) and a drunken Meadow makes a spectacle of herself while her Uncle Junior (Dominic Chianese) is singing. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Amour Fou The climactic ends of two unadvisable relationships have grim consequences in this gripping episode of the hit cable crime series. A heated argument with his mentally unhinged, illicit lover Gloria Trillo (Annabella Sciorra) leads to a near-homicide for New Jersey mob boss Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini). Although he nearly chokes the woman upon realizing that she's a carbon copy of his other, Tony backs off and sends his enforcer Patsy Parisi (Dan Grimaldi) to deliver a message to Gloria: the romance is over, and so is her life if she reveals their secret affair. Meanwhile, Tony's wife Carmela (Edie Falco) makes her first tentative moves toward independence, taking off the jewelry her husband bought her with ill-gotten gains and studying for a real estate license exam. Also, the budding romance between Tony's daughter Meadow (Jamie-Lynn Sigler) and wiseguy wannabe Jackie April Jr. (Jason Cerbone) has ended, leading Jackie to pull a dangerous stunt: the rip-off of a high-stakes Mafia card game. Gunfire is exchanged and although Jackie barely escapes with his life, his future is in serious doubt when Tony hands over final authority in the matter to his bloodthirsty captain, Ralph Cifaretto (Joe Pantoliano), who's unlikely to be influenced by his relationship with Jackie's mother. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: To Save Us All From Satan's Power A Mafia chieftain becomes uncharacteristically reflective as Christmas approaches in this episode of the cable TV drama. New Jersey mob boss Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) is experiencing a sense of loss over the death of his friend Pussy Bompensiero, who traditionally played Santa Claus at Tony's annual charity bash. Tony's feelings of woe are compounded by his discovery of his daughter's boyfriend, wiseguy wannabe Jackie Aprile Jr. (Jason Cerbone), receiving a lap dance from a stripper at a go-go club; Tony gives the college dropout a solid beating. In the meantime, a Russian money launderer friend of Tony's gives him a little holiday gift: the identity of the ruffian who viciously assaulted his sister Janice (Aida Turturro). Tony and his lieutenant Furio give the man a beating as a holiday gift to Janice, and on Christmas morning, a chastened Jackie shows up with a gift for Tony's daughter Meadow (Jamie-Lynn Sigler) and an attitude adjustment for her father. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Second Opinion Dealing with health care professionals of various stripes proves to be an arduous task for two members of a crime family in this episode of the hit cable TV series. When his Uncle Junior (Dominic Chianese) undergoes a not-entirely successful cancer treatment at the hands of less-than-compassionate Dr. John Kennedy (Sam McMurray), New Jersey mob boss Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) is furious. So he schedules a threatening heart-to-heart with the surgeon on the golf course that leaves Junior in the doctor's suddenly far more caring hands. In the meantime, Tony's wife Carmela (Edie Falco) is referred to a blunt psychotherapist (Mike Nichols), who tells her that she's complicit in her husband's crimes and will never be happy unless she leaves him. In the meantime, Tony's lieutenants Paulie Walnuts (Tony Sirico) and Christopher Moltisanti (Michael Imperioli) continue to clash over their new business arrangements, and Tony deals with the financial concerns of the widowed Angie Bompensiero (Toni Kalem) by smashing the window of her new Cadillac. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Another Toothpick New Jersey mob kingpin Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) is finally joined by his wife, Carmela (Edie Falco), for a contentious session with his therapist, Dr. Jennifer Melfi (Lorraine Bracco), in this episode of the hit HBO drama series. When his frustrations lead to a traffic ticket from officious trooper Wilmore (Charles S. Dutton) on the way home, an angry Tony tells his corrupt state assemblyman, Zellman (Peter Riegert), to "fix it." Compounding Tony's frustrations and concerns is the fact that his Uncle Junior (Dominic Chianese) has cancer, a family associate has been put in a coma by an unprovoked attack, and a dying former gangster (Burt Young) has been assigned a retaliatory hit. Then there's Tony's daughter, Meadow (Jamie-Lynn Sigler), still not speaking to her father because of his racist attitudes, and his restaurant-owner friend Artie Bucco (John Ventimiglia) has a crush on his nephew's girlfriend, Adriana (Drea de Matteo). When Tony goes to Fountains of Wayne to pick up a backyard ornament, he discovers that Officer Wilmore has been reduced to a part-time job because his run-in with Tony has had political repercussions. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Fortunate Son New Jersey mob boss Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) makes a breakthrough in his therapy with Dr. Melfi (Lorraine Bracco) in this episode of the hit drama series. Remembering that his first "spell" occurred when he was 11 years old, Tony suddenly realizes that all of his blackouts have occurred when he was preparing meat. This revelation forces him to confront a painful memory about his father and recently deceased mother. Meanwhile, Tony's nephew, Christopher (Michael Imperioli), bungles his new responsibilities of a "made man" and is forced to hold up a Rutgers University box office to pay his weekly payment to Paulie Walnuts (Tony Sirico). A feud between Tony's sister, Janice (Aida Turturro), and their late mother's housekeeper, Svetlana, heats up, resulting in a stolen artificial leg, while Meadow (Jamie-Lynn Sigler) gives her dad Tony the silent treatment, and Anthony Jr. (Robert Iler) excels on the football field. When he's promoted for his gridiron performance, however, A.J. blacks out under the pressure, just like his dad. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Proshai, Livushka Some computer-generated imagery summons the ghost of a departed cast member for one final appearance in this turning point episode of the hit crime drama. After learning that his daughter Meadow (Jamie-Lynn Sigler) is dating a half Jewish, half African-American student at Columbia, New Jersey mob boss Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) has a stress-related anxiety attack and blackout. His problems are compounded when, after a contentious visit with his mother Livia (Nancy Marchand), he receives word that the manipulative matriarch has died of a stroke. Tony's flower-child sister, Janice (Aida Tuturro), insists on a memorial service but gets more than she bargained for when assembled family members share their true feelings about the less-than-dearly departed. At a session with his therapist, Dr. Jennifer Melfi (Lorraine Bracco), Tony about sums it up by confiding that he's glad his mother is gone. A key witness against him in a case involving stolen airline tickets, Livia is now silenced forever, and her emotional passive-aggression is no longer a part of his life. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Eloise While Carmela and Furio deal with unspoken feelings, a disagreement leads to problems between the two families. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: No-Show An off-color joke made by Ralph has the potential to create problems. Meanwhile, Christopher's ascension within the ranks leads to bitterness. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Whitecaps In the fourth season finale, Tony and Carmela's relationship begins to crumble under the weight of their marital problems, and Junior's trial concludes. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Whoever Did This The rift between Tony and Ralph reaches a crescendo. Meanwhile, Junior hopes to avoid trial. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Calling All Cars Tensions mount between the New Jersey and New York families over a housing scam. Meanwhile, Tony has another vivid dream and Bobby is bereft with grief. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: The Strong, Silent Type After Christopher's substance abuse gets out of hand, Tony organizes an intervention. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Christopher While Junior's trial begins, Silvio and Artie attempt to thwart a protest of the annual Columbus Day parade. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Everybody Hurts Tony learns of a former comare's death, and Artie Bucco enters into a dubious business arrangement. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: The Weight Animosity grows between Johnny Sack and Ralphi, while attraction blooms between Carmela and Furio. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Watching Too Much Television Following Paulie's release from prison, Tony and Ralph discuss a housing scam with Zellman. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: For All Debts Public and Private The fourth season premiere finds Junior struggling to pay his legal costs and Adriana befriending an undercover FBI agent. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Pie-O-My Echoing his past admiration of animals, Tony becomes enamored with a race horse. Meanwhile, a grieving Bobby finds solace with Janice. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Mergers & Acquisitions While Paulie's mother has trouble adjusting to her new retirement home, a woman comes between Tony and Ralph. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Where's Johnny Stricken with dementia, Uncle Junior wanders out on his own. Meanwhile, Feech La Manna becomes a potential liability. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: All Happy Families While Carmela loses control of AJ, Tony looks for a way to deal with the aging Feech La Manna. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Irregular Around the Margins An auto accident involving Tony and Adriana leads to rampant suspicion that the two are having an affair. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Sentimental Education While Carmela re-enters the dating scene, the recently paroled Tony Blundetto tries his hand at a civilian job. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Marco Polo The recently paroled Tony Blundetto is offered some work by the New York family, while the Soprano household plays host to a big party in honor of Carmela's father's 75th birthday. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: The Test Dream After an old friend is murdered by members of the New York family, Tony Blundetto makes a careless and unauthorized move. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Unidentified Black Males Tony Soprano learns of a misdeed committed by Tony Blundetto and attempts to cover for his cousin. Meanwhile, Finn gets a construction job and learns a shocking secret about Vito. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Rat Pack After a long prison sentence, Tony's cousin Tony Blundetto is paroled and finds the world a changed place. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Two Tonys In the fifth season opener, AJ and Carmela are shocked to encounter a ferocious bear in the backyard. Meanwhile, Tony attempts to court Dr. Melfi. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: All Due Respect In the fifth season finale, Tony finds the situation with his cousin Tony Blundetto beginning to affect his own people and realizes he must make a decision. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Long Term Parking With pressure from the FBI increasing on her, Adriana comes clean with Christopher about her role as an informant. Meanwhile, Tony attempts to protect his cousin. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Cold Cuts Christopher and Tony Blundetto visit a rural farm to move some corpses, while back in New Jersey, Janice's temper gets the best of her. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: In Camelot While Tony meets his father's old comare who reveals some surprising things about the elder Soprano, Junior grapples with his own mortality. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Join the Club Following his shooting at the hands of Uncle Junior, Tony finds himself in a comatose dream state. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: The Fleshy Part of the Thigh Tony befriends an aging scientist and a celebrity rapper while recuperating in the hospital. Meanwhile, a dying aunt drops a bombshell on Paulie. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Live Free or Die After Vito's secret life as a homosexual becomes public knowledge, he takes off to hide out in New Hampshire. Back in Jersey, Tony grapples with how to handle the situation. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Johnny Cakes While Vito finds something unexpected in New Hampshire, Tony meets an attractive realtor and AJ makes a rash decision about Uncle Junior. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Sopranos: Cold Stones Vito finally returns to face the family about his homosexuality. Meanwhile, Carmela vacations abroad and has a disturbin
  • A Christmas Carol - Blu-ray Disc

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Nov 3, 2009

    Widely considered to be the definitive of the many film versions of Charles Dickens' classic novel is this 1951 British adaptation, starring Alastair Sim (entitled "Scrooge" in its U.K. release). Sim plays Ebenezer Scrooge, a London miser who, despite his wealth, refuses to make charitable contributions and treats his sole employee, Bob Cratchit, as an indentured servant. On Christmas Eve, Scrooge is visited by the ghost of his late business partner, Jacob Marley, who was as selfish as Scrooge in life and has been condemned to an eternity of wandering the Earth in shackles. Marley informs Scrooge that he's to receive a trio of spirits that night who will take him on a journey through Christmases Past, Present, and Yet to Come. As Scrooge encounters each apparition, he is taken on a tour of his life and realizes what a wretch he is, transformed by greed from an idealistic youth into an embittered ogre. Infused with a new, cheery outlook, Scrooge sets about earning his redemption. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide
  • Capers - DVD

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Dec 1, 2009

    Three teams of criminals who have nothing in common but ineptitude each plot a big score in this wacky independent comedy. Connie (Phyllis Somerville) is an elderly and eternally ill-tempered woman who runs a run-down pawnshop in Brooklyn with the help of her dim-witted son Douglas (Daniel Stewart Sherman). There's a large safe behind the main counter of Connie's shop, and for years local ne'er-do-wells have been speculating about what valuables she might have stashed inside. When Connie falls ill and is taken to the hospital, three gangs of would-be thieves swing into action -- "The Amateurs," led by Fitz (Danny Masterson) and Dino (Michael Cecchi), who seem to have learned everything they know about crime from watching old movies about the mob; "The Moolies," led by Ronald (Leon) and Maya (Serena Reeder), whose style and attitude harkens back to the glory days of Yo! MTV Raps; and "The Sputniks," led by Lana (Aysan Celik) and Slava (Jonathan Hova), who hail from some former Soviet republic and literally live in black and white. Unfortunately, none of these small-time thieves are aware of the other two groups -- and they're all surprised to find they've chosen the same night to knock over the pawnshop. Also featuring Dominique Swain and Blanchard Ryan, Capers was an official selection at the 2009 Cinequest Film Festival in San Jose, California. ~ Mark Deming, All Movie Guide
  • Holiday Family Collection: Polar Express/Happy Feet/A Christmas Story

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Oct 6, 2009

    Includes:A Christmas Story (1983), MPAA Rating: PG The Polar Express (2004), MPAA Rating: G Happy Feet (2006), MPAA Rating: PG A Christmas Story Nine years after the Yuletide slasher flick Black Christmas, Porky's director Bob Clark once again took on the holiday genre, switching from gasps to laughs with A Christmas Story. Adapted from a memoir by humorist Jean Shepherd (who narrates), the film centers on Ralphie Parker (Peter Billingsley), a young boy living in 1940s Indiana, desperately yearning for a Red Rider BB gun for Christmas. Despite protests from his mother (Melinda Dillon) that he'll shoot his eye out, Ralphie persists, unsuccessfully trying to enlist the assistance of both his teacher and Santa Claus. All the while, Ralphie finds himself dealing with the constant taunts of a pair of bullies and trying to not get in the middle of a feud between his mother and father (Darren McGavin) regarding a sexy lamp. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide The Polar Express Directed by Robert Zemeckis and based on children's author Chris Van Allsburg's modern holiday classic of the same name, The Polar Express revolves around Billy (Hayden McFarland), who longs to believe in Santa Claus but finds it quite difficult to do so, what with his family's dogged insistence that all of it, from the North Pole, to the elves, to the man himself, is all just a myth. This all changes, however, on Christmas Eve, when a mysterious train visits Billy in the middle of the night, promising to take him and a group of other lucky children to the North Pole for a visit with Santa. The train's conductor (Tom Hanks) along with the other passengers help turn Billy's crisis in faith into a journey of self-discovery. A long-time fan of Van Allsburg's book, Hanks also helped produce the film. ~ Tracie Cooper, All Movie Guide Happy Feet In the world of the emperor penguin, a simple song can mean the difference between a lifetime of happiness and an eternity of loneliness. When a penguin named Mumble is born without the ability to sing the romantic song that will attract his soul mate, he'll have to resort to some fancy footwork by tap dancing his way into the heart of the one he loves. Directed by Babe mastermind George Miller, Happy Feet tells the tale of one penguin's quest for love, and features an all-star cast of vocal talent that includes Robin Williams, Hugh Jackman, Elijah Wood, Nicole Kidman, and Brittany Murphy. ~ Jason Buchanan, All Movie Guide
  • Essential Art House, Vol. 4

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Sep 15, 2009

    Includes:The 39 Steps (1935) Mayerling (1936) Le Jour Se Lève (1939) The Tales of Hoffmann (1951) Gervaise (1956) Throne of Blood (1957) The 39 Steps This classic British thriller was one of Alfred Hitchcock's first major international successes, and it introduced a number of the stylistic and thematic elements that became hallmarks of his later work. Richard Hannay (Robert Donat), a Canadian rancher on vacation in England, attends a music hall performance by "Mr. Memory" (Wylie Watson); in the midst of the show, shots ring out and Richard flees the theater. Moments later, a terrified woman (Lucie Mannheim) begs Richard to help her; back at his room, she tells him that she's a British spy whose life has been threatened by international agents waiting outside. Richard is certain that she's mad until she reappears at his door in the morning, near death with a knife in her back, a map in her hand, and muttering something about "39 Steps." Discovering that a group of thugs are indeed waiting outside, Richard slips away and takes the first train to the Scottish town on the dead woman's map. Richard learns that he's now wanted by the police for murder, and he must find a way to clear his name. He begins trying to do so with the help of a woman he meets en route, Pamela (Madeleine Carroll), who serves as his unwitting assistant, even after she tries to turn him in. The 39 Steps was later remade in 1959 and 1978 -- both without Hitchcock's participation. ~ Mark Deming, All Movie Guide Mayerling Based on Idol's End, a novel by Claude Anet, the French Mayerling is based on the tragic real-life story of Hapsburg Crown Prince Rudolph and his mistress, Baroness Marie Vetsera. Since the details of Rudolph and Marie's lives and deaths are clouded in controversy, much of the film is romanticized speculation-with emphasis on the romance. The film establishes Rudolph (Charles Boyer) as a rebellious "man of the people", at eternal odds with his despotic father, Emperor Franz Joseph (Jean Dax). To keep him quiet and out of trouble, Rudolph is forced into an arranged marriage, and surrounded by Hapsburg informers and spies. In an effort to escape this oppressive atmosphere, a disguised Rudolph dashes off to a fair, where he meets the beauteous 17-year-old Marie (Danielle Darieux). Thus begins an illicit romance, which the lovers try vainly to keep secret from the prying eyes of the Emperor's flunkeys. One of Rudolph's enemies arranges for Marie to be taken away to Trieste for a "rest cure." Rudolph sinks into a drunken depression, snapping out of it only when Marie returns. They attempt to legitimize their love through marriage, but the Catholic hierarchy will not approve of Rudolph's divorcing his wife. Desperately, the lovers flee to Rudolph's hunting lodge in Mayerling. Here they spend an exquisite last night together, then formulate a death pact. The following day, Marie and Rudolph are found lying side by side-united in death. Transforming this grim story into a tender, moving romance was quite an undertaking, but the end result was worth it: Mayerling was a huge international hit, and the winner of several industry awards, including the New York film critics' "best foreign picture" prize. Mayerling was remade in surprisingly cold and distant fashion in 1968, with Omar Sharif and Catherine Deneuve. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Le Jour Se Lève Marcel Carne and Jacques Prevert's classic of French poetic realism stars Jean Gabin in one of his most famous roles as Francois, a rough, barrel-chested loner who hides out in his apartment awaiting for the police to arrive. Francois has killed a man in a crime of passion, the slimy lothario Valentin (Jules Berry). As he listens in the darkness of his Normandy apartment to the police sirens closing in and getting louder, he recalls the two women that he loved -- Francoise (Jacqueline Laurent) and Clara (Arletty) -- and the evil Valentin, who stole both their hearts and forced Francois into this
  • Negima - The Complete Collection

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Sep 29, 2009

    Includes - Negima!: 17: Nothing Is Difficult for a Lover (Nihil Difficile Amanti) (2005) Negima!: 20: Unless You Have Believed, You Will Not Understand (Nisi Credideritis, Non Intelligetis) (2005) Negima!: 19: Words Fly Away, Those Written Remain (Verba Velant, Scripta Manent) (2005) Negima!: 18: Love Does Not Recognize Rank (Amor Ordinem Nescit) (2005) Negima!: 21: It Must Not At All Be Despaired (Nil Desperandum) (2005) Negima!: 1: The Blockhead in the Professor's Chair (Asinus in Cathedra) (2005) Negima!: 3: Lovers, Lunatics (Amantes, Amentes) (2005) Negima!: 12: Either Learn or Leave (Aut Disce Aut Discede) (2005) Negima!: 11: When They Are Silent, They Are Shouting (Cum Tacent Clamant) (2005) Negima!: 10: Where There Is Harmony, There Is Victory (Ubi Concordia, Ibi Victoria) (2005) Negima!: 9: I'll Get You, Wascally Wabbit! (Te Capiam, Cunicule Sceleste!) (2005) Negima!: 8: One Night Befalls All of Us (Omnes Una Manet Nox) (2005) Negima!: 7: The Appearance of Things Are Deceptive (Fallaces Sunt Rerum Species) (2005) Negima!: 6: Between a Rock and a Hard Place (A Fronte Praecipitium A Tergo Lupi) (2005) Negima!: 5: Rumor Flies (Fama Volat) (2005) Negima!: 4: No Place Is Like Home (Nullus Est Instar Domus)\ (2005) Negima!: 23: Remember to Die (Memento Mori) (2005) Negima!: 24: Both Weapons and Words Wound (Et Arma Verba Vulnerant) (2005) Negima!: 25: Death Is Certain, the Time Is Uncertain (Mors Certa, Mora Incerta) (2005) Negima!: 26: Not for Me, Not for You, But for Us (Mihi, Non Tibi, Sed Nobis) (2005) Negima!: 16: Love and a Cough Are Not Kept Secret (Amor Tussisque Non Celantur) (2005) Negima!: 15: A Reliable Friend Is Perceived in an Uncertain Situation (Amicus Certus in Re Incerta Ce(2005) Negima!: 14: I Hope the Memory of Our Friendship Will Be Eternal (Amicitiae Nostrae Memoriam Spero Se(2005) Negima!: 13: We Live and Learn (Tamdiu Discendum Est, Quamdiu Vivas) (2005) Negima!: 2: Every Beginning Is Difficult (Omne Initium Est Difficile) (2005) Negima!: 22: It Is Difficult to Make a Joke With a Sad Mind (Difficile Est Tristi Fingere Mente Jocum(2005) Negima!: 17: Nothing Is Difficult for a Lover (Nihil Difficile Amanti) No synopsis available. Negima!: 20: Unless You Have Believed, You Will Not Understand (Nisi Credideritis, Non Intelligetis) No synopsis available. Negima!: 19: Words Fly Away, Those Written Remain (Verba Velant, Scripta Manent) No synopsis available. Negima!: 18: Love Does Not Recognize Rank (Amor Ordinem Nescit) No synopsis available. Negima!: 21: It Must Not At All Be Despaired (Nil Desperandum) No synopsis available. Negima!: 1: The Blockhead in the Professor's Chair (Asinus in Cathedra) No synopsis available. Negima!: 3: Lovers, Lunatics (Amantes, Amentes) No synopsis available. Negima!: 12: Either Learn or Leave (Aut Disce Aut Discede) No synopsis available. Negima!: 11: When They Are Silent, They Are Shouting (Cum Tacent Clamant) No synopsis available. Negima!: 10: Where There Is Harmony, There Is Victory (Ubi Concordia, Ibi Victoria) No synopsis available. Negima!: 9: I'll Get You, Wascally Wabbit! (Te Capiam, Cunicule Sceleste!) No synopsis available. Negima!: 8: One Night Befalls All of Us (Omnes Una Manet Nox) No synopsis available. Negima!: 7: The Appearance of Things Are Deceptive (Fallaces Sunt Rerum Species) No synopsis available. Negima!: 6: Between a Rock and a Hard Place (A Fronte Praecipitium A Tergo Lupi) No synopsis available. Negima!: 5: Rumor Flies (Fama Volat) No synopsis available. Negima!: 4: No Place Is Like Home (Nullus Est Instar Domus)\ No synopsis available. Negima!: 23: Remember to Die (Memento Mori) No synopsis available. Negima!: 24: Both Weapons and Words Wound (Et Arma Verba Vulnerant) No synopsis available. Negima!: 25: Death Is Certain, the Time Is Uncertain (Mors Certa, Mora Incerta) No synopsis available. Negima!: 26: Not for Me, Not for You, But for Us (Mihi, Non Tibi, Sed Nobis) No synopsis available.
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