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  • Passing Strange - DVD

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Jan 12, 2010

    Oscar-nominated filmmaker Spike Lee turns his camera toward the stage for this filmed performance of the acclaimed Broadway musical by singer/songwriter Stew and his creative partner Heidi Rodewald. Developed at the Sundance Theater Lab, the story follows a young black man from Los Angeles as he attempts to make sense of the conflicted cultural signals constantly bombarding him from all sides. Raised in a religious household somewhere south of Interstate 10, the frustrated adolescent feels suffocated by his mother's fixation on family ties, her unwavering devotion to the church, and her unapologetically bourgeois aspirations in life. He longs to experience something "real" in life, ultimately making the decision to follow in the footsteps of James Baldwin and Josephine Baker by traveling to Europe and exploring the world. From outrageous Amsterdam to ultra-militant Berlin, the impressionable wanderer experiences misadventures with sex, drugs, politics, and art as his eyes are opened ever wider to the world around him. ~ Jason Buchanan, All Movie Guide
  • The Notebook - DVD

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Jan 19, 2010

    Directed by Nick Cassavetes, this adaptation of author Nicholas Sparks' bestselling novel revolves around Noah Calhoun's (James Garner) regular visits to a female patron (Gena Rowlands) of an area nursing home. Rather than bore her with the inanities of everyday life, Calhoun reads from an old, faded notebook containing the sweeping account of a young couple (Ryan Gosling and Rachel McAdams) whose love affair was tragically put to a halt after their separation in the midst of World War II. Seven years later, the couple was reunited, and, despite having taken radically different paths, they found themselves unable to resist the call of a second chance. The Notebook also features Joan Allen, Sam Shepard, and Kevin Connolly. ~ Tracie Cooper, All Movie Guide
  • Ace Ventura: Pet Detective - DVD

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Feb 2, 2010

    When your dog, bird, or water-dwelling mammal disappears, who do you call? Ace Ventura (Jim Carrey) is a low-rent private eye who specializes in recovering lost animals, so when Snowflake, the Miami Dolphins' aquatic mascot, is kidnapped, team representative Melissa Robinson (Courtney Cox) puts Ace on the case. However, Snowflake isn't the only Miami Dolphin who has gone missing; several key members of the team also disappear, including quarterback Dan Marino (who plays himself), who is spirited away while filming a TV commercial. With the Super Bowl only two weeks away, will Ace be able to find Snowflake and the missing athletes in time to salvage the big game? Ace Ventura: Pet Detective was a surprise box office smash and catapulted manic comedian Jim Carrey to stardom. The supporting cast includes Sean Young as ill-tempered Lois Einhorn, Udo Kier as the sinister Ronald Camp, and rapper Tone Loc as Ace's detective pal Emilio (Loc also wrote and performed a song for the closing credits). ~ Mark Deming, All Movie Guide
  • G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero: The Complete Series

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Nov 10, 2009

    Includes:G.I. Joe: Twenty Questions (1985) G.I. Joe: Eye For an Eye (1985) G.I. Joe: The Traitor, Part Two (1985) G.I. Joe: Skeleton in the Closet (1985) G.I. Joe: Countdown for Zartan (1985) G.I. Joe: No Place Like Springfield, Part Two (1985) G.I. Joe: No Place Like Springfield, Part One (1985) G.I. Joe: The Great Alaskan Land Rush (1985) G.I. Joe: The Invaders (1985) G.I. Joe: The Wrong Stuff (1985) G.I. Joe: The Pit of Vipers (1985) G.I. Joe: Memories of Mara (1985) G.I. Joe: Pyramid of Darkness, Part Three (1985) G.I. Joe: Pyramid of Darkness, Part Two (1985) G.I. Joe: Operation Mind Menace (1985) G.I. Joe: The Funhouse (1985) G.I. Joe: Cobra's Creatures (1985) G.I. Joe: Jungle Trap (1985) G.I. Joe: Cobra Stops the World (1985) G.I. Joe: Satellite Down (1985) G.I. Joe: Red Rocket's Glare (1985) G.I. Joe: Cobra Soundwaves (1985) G.I. Joe: Money to Burn (1985) G.I. Joe: Cobra's Candidate (1985) G.I. Joe: Lights! Camera! Cobra! (1985) G.I. Joe: The Phantom Brigade (1985) G.I. Joe: The Synthoid Conspiracy, Part Two (1985) G.I. Joe: The Synthoid Conspiracy, Part One (1985) G.I. Joe: Haul Down the Heavens (1985) G.I. Joe: The Greenhouse Effect (1985) G.I. Joe: Spell of the Siren (1985) G.I. Joe: The Viper is Coming (1985) G.I. Joe: The Germ (1985) G.I. Joe: The Battle for the Train of Gold (1985) G.I. Joe: Pyramid of Darkness, Part Four (1985) G.I. Joe: Pyramid of Darkness, Part One (1985) G.I. Joe: Lasers in the Night (1985) G.I. Joe: The Gamesmaster (1985) G.I. Joe: Where the Reptiles Roam (1985) G.I. Joe: Hearts and Cannons (1985) G.I. Joe: Flint's Vacation (1985) G.I. Joe: Primordial Plot (1985) G.I. Joe: The Gods Below (1985) G.I. Joe: Cobra CLAWs are Coming to Town (1985) G.I. Joe: Eau de Cobra (1985) G.I. Joe: Excalibur (1985) G.I. Joe: Bazooka Saw a Sea Serpent (1985) G.I. Joe: Cobra Quake (1985) G.I. Joe: Pyramid of Darkness, Part Five (1985) G.I. Joe: Cold Slither (1985) G.I. Joe: The Traitor, Part One (1985) G.I. Joe: Worlds Without End, Part Two (1985) G.I. Joe: Captives of Cobra, Part One (1985) G.I. Joe: Worlds Without End, Part One (1985) G.I. Joe: Captives of Cobra, Part Two (1985) G.I. Joe: Grey Hair and Growing Pains (1986) G.I. Joe: In the Presence of Mine Enemies (1986) G.I. Joe: Sins of Our Fathers (1986) G.I. Joe: Joe's Night Out (1986) G.I. Joe: Second Hand Emotions (1986) G.I. Joe: Nightmare Assault (1986) G.I. Joe: The Most Dangerous Thing in the World (1986) G.I. Joe: G.I. Joe and the Golden Fleece (1986) G.I. Joe: Ninja Holiday (1986) G.I. Joe: Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Part Five (1986) G.I. Joe: Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Part Four (1986) G.I. Joe: Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Part Three (1986) G.I. Joe: Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Part Two (1986) G.I. Joe: Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Part One (1986) G.I. Joe: The Spy That Rooked Me (1986) G.I. Joe: Glamour Girls (1986) G.I. Joe: Cobrathon (1986) G.I. Joe: Sink the Montana (1986) G.I. Joe: Raise the Flagg! (1986) G.I. Joe: My Brother's Keeper (1986) G.I. Joe: Iceberg Goes South (1986) G.I. Joe: The Rotten Egg (1986) G.I. Joe: Million Dollar Medic (1986) G.I. Joe: Once Upon a Joe... (1986) G.I. Joe: Let's Play Soldier (1986) G.I. Joe: Computer Complications (1986) G.I. Joe: Last Hour to Doomsday (1986) G.I. Joe: My Favorite Things (1986) G.I. Joe: Into Your Tent I Will Silently Creep (1986) G.I. Joe: Not a Ghost of a Chance (1986) G.I. Joe: Twenty Questions The Joe team's war games are interrupted by Hector Ramirez, muckraking host of the TV series "Twenty Questions." Ramirez has brought along a peacenik named Arnold, who claims that the Joes are frauds who use the threat of Cobra attack as a means to cheat the American taxpayers. Hoping to prove Arnold wrong, Shipwreck conducts an unauthorized tour of the Joes' headquarters -- only to discover that Arnold is really the evil Baroness in disguise. Written by Buzz Dixon, "Twenty Questions" made its American TV debut on October 2, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Eye For an Eye A fierce battle between the Cobras and the Joes has devastating consequences on a family of innocent bystanders. Though his loved ones are safe, Charles Fairmont is enraged over the destruction of his home. Invading the Joes' base in search of revenge, Fairmont finds an unexpected ally in the form of Lady Jaye, who feels personally responsible for the man's plight. Written by Steve Mitchell and Barbara Petty, "Eye for an Eye" made its American TV debut on November 8, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Traitor, Part Two In the conclusion of a two-part adventure, the Joes have rescued Dusty from prison, certain that his traitorous behavior was borne of desperation over the plight of his sick mother. But can Dusty be reformed, and will he prove a valuable member of the Joe team? Apparently not: When Cobra tries to test its new mind-control gas on the Joes, Dusty assists the villains every step of the way. Be assured, however, that the story is not quite over yet. Written by Buzz Dixon, part two of the "The Traitor" originally aired in America on November 26, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Skeleton in the Closet Upon receiving an inheritance, Joe member Lady Jaye journeys to her ancestral home in Scotland. Feeling that something is amiss, LJ soon learns the awful truth: She is related to her longtime enemy Destro. The ensuing battle royal between the Joes and Cobras turns out to be the result of a carefully mapped scheme by another old enemy. A neat twist caps this episode, which was written by Flint Dille. "Skeleton in the Closet" first aired in America on December 11, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Countdown for Zartan Zartan is hired by Cobra Commander to blow up a peace conference at World Wide Defense Center, thereby covering up secret information about Cobra's terrorist activities. Posing as a kidnapped French scientist, Zartan is exposed by Joe member Spirit -- who is promptly abducted by Storm Shadow. The other members of the Joe Team race against the clock to locate and disarm Zartan's bomb. Written by Christy Marx, "Countdown for Zartan" first aired in America on September 23, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: No Place Like Springfield, Part Two In the concluding chapter of a two-part story, Shipwreck finally realizes that his "new" life as a family man in the town of Springfield is actually a sham, created by Cobra to force him to reveal the deadly water-to-explosive formula locked in his subconscious. Rescued from madness by Polly, Shipwreck does his best to foil Cobra's plans -- if only he can locate the rest of the Joe Team. But there's a tragic price to pay for the good guys' ultimate victory. Written by Steve Gerber, "No Place Like Springfield, Pt. 2" first aired in America on December 13, 1985, as the final episode of G.I. Joe's first TV season. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: No Place Like Springfield, Part One In the first episode of a two-part adventure, Dr. Melany's new formula for changing water into explosive is planted in Shipwreck's subconscious -- and only Lady Jaye knows the code word that will release the formula. Upon awakening from an unusually deep sleep, Shipwreck discovers that several years have passed, and that his has settled down to a cozy domestic existence with his wife, Mara (formerly a mermaid), and his daughter. Slowly but surely, however, Shipwreck senses that something is not quite right about his new surroundings. Written by Steve Gerber, "No Place Like Springfield, Pt. 1" first aired in America on December 12, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Great Alaskan Land Rush Claiming to a have found a legal loophole in Seward's Alaskan purchase of 1867, Cobra and a shifty used car dealer named Gorgy Potemkin gain full control of Alaska. Their plans include using the 49th state as a power base to attack the rest of the world. Once again, the Joes join forces with the Soviet Oktober Guard to foil Cobra's scheme. Written by David Carren, "The Great Alaskan Land Rush" was first telecast in America on December 3, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Invaders Both the U.S. and the U.S.S.R. are held in thrall by an apparent alien invasion of Earth. It soon develops, however, that the "invasion" has been orchestrated by Cobra, as part of a scheme to destroy both Moscow and Washington and establish Cobra as the world's only superpower. This time around, the Joes are joined by their Soviet counterparts, the Oktober Guard, in thwarting the villain's plans. Written by Dennis O'Neil, "The Invaders" originally aired in America on November 29, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Wrong Stuff Could it be that writers Stanley Ralph Ross and Flint Dille had a certain Atlanta-based TV mogul in mind when they wrote this episode of G.I. Joe? On this occasion, Cobra removes all space satellites from orbit, the better to create a worldwide broadcasting monopoly, Cobra Network Television. By offering twisted "message" sitcoms like "Father's No Beast" and even (horrors!) changing the endings of classic old films, the CTN is aimed at controlling the minds of all earthlings -- or at least, all cable subscribers. "The Wrong Stuff" first aired in America on November 28, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Pit of Vipers The G.I. Joe team is placed under the command of the new super-computer Watchdog, which has ostensibly been designed to seek out Cobra targets. Little do the heroes realize that Watchdog has been created by the Cobras themselves, and is programmed to send the Joes far off the beaten track, leaving their headquarters vulnerable to Cobra's deadly Pit Viper attacks. James M. Ward wrote the script, from an original story by Flint Dille. "The Pit of Vipers" originally aired in the U.S. on November 27, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Memories of Mara The titular Mara is a blue-skinned women whom we first see wearing a Cobra diving suit. Rescued by Joe Team member Shipwreck, Mara reveals that she is the half-human, half-fish result of a misfire Cobra experiment aimed at enabling humans to remain underwater indefinitely. With Mara's help, the Joes try to locate the U.S.S. Nerka, a submarine stolen by Cobra. Written by Sharman Di Vono, "Memories of Mara" first aired in the U.S. on November 15, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Pyramid of Darkness, Part Three In the third episode of the five-part |Pyramid of Darkness, Joe Team members Lady Jaye, Flint, Shipwreck, and Snake Eyes have managed to escape the perils presented them in the previous episode, "Rendezvous in the City of the Dead." A new ally is introduced in the form of a sexy nightclub singer named Satin. Cobra functionary Zartan manages to activate the control cubes, setting off a chain events culminating in a dangerous encounter with killer seals on an iceberg. Written by Ron Friedman, "Three Cubes to Darkness" first aired in America on September 18, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Pyramid of Darkness, Part Two In the second episode of the five-part |Pyramid of Darkness, the G.I. Joe team leads a counteroffensive against Cobra in hopes of regaining Space Station Delta. Joe members Shipwreck and Snake-Eyes are able to steal some of the all-important control cubes and a laser weapon, leading to a near-fatal escapade in a volcano called the Devil's Playground. Meanwhile, the dreaded Dreadnoks delighting in tormenting the captured Joes who have been forced into slave labor on Delta. Written by Ron Friedman, Rendezvous in the City of the Dead first aired in America on September 17, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Operation Mind Menace Taking control of the minds of several innocent civilians, Cobra artificially expands their powers, organizing his captives into an offensive army. Among these new mind-slaves is Tommy, the brother of G.I. Joe team member Airborne. Racing to Tommy's rescue, Airborne and Flash soon find themselves in need of rescuing. Written by Martin Pasko, "Operation Mind Menace" made its American TV debut on October 15, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Funhouse Cobra makes no effort to hide the fact that it has kidnapped five of the world's top scientists. It is all part of Cobra Commander's scheme to wreak a terrible vengeance on the G.I. Joe team. Lured to a South American island, the Joes find themselves at the mercy of Cobra's booby traps in a simulated funhouse -- and never have a rollercoaster and shooting gallery seemed more sinister. Written by Steve Mitchell and Barbara Petty, "The Funhouse" first aired in the U.S. on October 1, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Cobra's Creatures This time, Cobra has gotten hold of a device called Hi-Freq, invented by one Dr. Lucifer. The device enables the villains to gain mind control over all the animals of the world. To test Hi-Freq, Cobra kidnaps G.I. Joe team members Mutt, Junkyard. and Ripcord as human guinea pigs. Meanwhile, the other Joes try to win over Dr. Lucifer by having Lady Jaye pose as the scientist's sweetheart, Dr. Attila. Written by Kimmer Ringwald, "Cobra's Creatures" made its first American TV appearance on September 30, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Jungle Trap In its efforts to harness the raw energy supplies in the center of the earth, Cobra kidnaps eminent scientist Dr. Shakoor. Forced to do Cobra's bidding, Shakoor devises the awesome Vulcan Machine. Meanwhile, the G.I. Joe team endeavors to rescue the missing scientist -- a task comparable to finding a needle in the world's largest haystack. Written by future Batman: The Animated Series maven Paul Dini, "Jungle Trap" originally aired in America on September 27, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Cobra Stops the World Cobra attempts to gain control of the world's fuel supplies so that the leaders of Earth will knuckle under to his demands. With each passing hour, Cobra utilizes his weaponry to destroy another oil tanker. The G.I. Joe teams races against the clock to track down the source of the destruction, and in the process, team members Duke and Ace find themselves imprisoned in an all-but-impenetrable jungle. Written by Steve Gerber, "Cobra Stops the World" first aired in America on September 26, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Satellite Down Breaker manages to force a G.I. Joe spy satellite stolen by Cobra to crash somewhere in the African jungle. Both the Joe and Cobra teams race into unchartered territory to recover the satellite, only to discover that the device has been adopted as a "god" by a lost tribe called the Primords. This episode contains a cute closing gag involving the Primords' reaction to that demon machine known as Television. Written by Ted Pederson, "Satellite Down" first aired in the U.S. on September 25, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Red Rocket's Glare Extensive Enterprises, a front organization for Cobra, uses a vicious gang of bikers to force the owners of the Red Rocket Drive-Thru Diners to sell out at bargain-basement prices. It is the first step in a scheme to install sophisticated anti-personnel weapons throughout the country. But Cobra has not taken into consideration the G.I. Joe team -- specifically, team member Roadblock, whose aunt and uncle own one of the beleaguered Red Rocket restaurants. Written by Mary Skrenes, "Red Rocket's Glare" originally aired in the U.S. on September 24, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Cobra Soundwaves This time, Cobra has gotten hold of an anti-aircraft gun which emits sonic waves for sinister purposes. Acting quickly, the villains threaten to use the weapon to destroy the oil resources of a Middle Eastern nation. But the G.I. Joe team has likewise swung into action, and they're not about to be "soundly" beaten by the Cobra forces. Written by Ted Pederson, "Cobra Soundwaves" originally aired in America on October 17, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Money to Burn Cobra destroys America's economy by vaporizing all of the country's money. He then takes steps to gain complete control by distributing his own personalized currency. To counteract this financial disaster, G.I. Joe team member Lady Jaye poses as Cobra's filthy-rich "client" Gloria Vonderhoss. Making its first American television appearance on October 14, 1985 (a few weeks later in some local markets), "Money to Burn" was written by Roger Slifer. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Cobra's Candidate In the midst of a heated political campaign, Cobra Commander hopes to sway voters to his handpicked candidate, Robert Harper, by casting Harper in the role of persecuted underdog. To that end, Cobra enlists the aid of a tough street gang, who stages riots which appear to be the handiwork of Harper's opponent, Whittier Greenway. The plan is foiled when a hitherto unsupsected link between the street gang and the G.I. Joe team is revealed. Written by Gordon Kent, "Cobra's Candidate" originally aired in the U.S. on October 11, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Lights! Camera! Cobra! Several of the G.I. Joe team's more contentious members are hired as technical advisors for the Hollywood epic "The G.I. Joe Story." Striving for realism, the producers have stored several authentic Joe and Cobra weapons in their prop shed, including a genuine Cobra Firebat plane. In his efforts to steal the plane, Cobra commander must rely upon the mercurial Destro and the unpredictable Dreadnoks. The story outcome is determined by the studio's crack team of special effects wizards. Written by Buzz Dixon, "Lights! Camera! Cobra!" first aired in the U.S. on October 10, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Phantom Brigade Cobra Commander uses an elderly gypsy woman to conjure up three dangerous ghosts: a Roman legionnaire, a Mongol warrior, and an American WWI flying ace. He then sends them into battle against the G.I. Joe team, secure in the knowledge that phantoms can't be killed or injured. The Joes attempt to mount a counteroffensive by appealing to the dormant patriotism of the American ghost. Written by Sharman Di Vono, "The Phantom Brigade" originally aired in America on October 9, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Synthoid Conspiracy, Part Two In the conclusion of a two-part story, Cobra has managed to cut off funding for the G.I. Joe team with the use of his Synthoids, humanlike creatures programmed to do the villains' bidding. Even worse, Joe member Duke has been replaced by his Synthoid clone. Managing to escape Cobra's clutches, Duke links up with his fellow Joes in an effort to stem the Synthoid invasion -- receiving unexpected assistance in the form of the evil Destro, who is again locked in a power struggle with his Cobra bosses. Written by Christy Marx, "The Synthoid Conspiracy, Pt. 2" first aired in America on October 8, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Synthoid Conspiracy, Part One In the first episode of a two-part story, Cobra infiltrates the committee responsible for funding the activities of the G.I. Joe team. The villains replace several key members with lookalike Synthoid, which have been programmed to bend exclusively to Cobra's will. Not only do the Joes lose their financial base, but to make matters worse, team member Duke is likewise replaced by a lookalike Synthoid. Written by Christy Marx, "The Synthoid Conspiracy, Pt. 1" first aired in America on October 7, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Haul Down the Heavens Cobra encamps itself at the North Pole, the better to use the powerful Ion Attractor to melt the polar ice cap and upset the ecological balance of the earth. To prevent this, G.I. Joe team members Flint, Lady Jaye, and Snow Job, together with a group of scientists, head to the Arctic, only to find out that the villains are more than prepared for such a counteroffensive. The episode's highlight is Lady Jaye's tone-deaf rendition of the U.S. Marine Hymn. Written by television cartoon veteran Buzz Dixon, "Haul Down the Heavens" originally aired in America on October 4, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Greenhouse Effect A non-polluting rocket fuel that causes plants to grow to enormous size is stolen by a member of the Crimson Guards. Chortling in glee, Cobra leader Destro plans to use the fuel to create an army of killer plants. The episode's climax is a bizarre, gargantuan "food fight" between the Cobras and the G.I. Joe team. Written by Gordon Kent, "The Greenhouse Effect" made its first American TV appearance on October 3, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Spell of the Siren The Baroness hatches another scheme to take over Cobra. Her first step is to harness the power of the Conch of the Siren to hypnotize the male team members of both the Cobras and the Joes. Inevitably, it is up to the female Joes -- and a few stray unaffected males who had been off base during the Siren's aural assault -- to rescue their comrades. Written by Gerry and Carla Conway, "Spell of the Siren" was first broadcast in America on October 25, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Viper is Coming Responding to what they think are cryptic challenges from Cobra, the G.I. Joe team, led by Barbecue, heads to various parts of the world, armed for battle. Only after the dust is settled do they realize that it's all a false alarm. The climax of David Carren's teleplay was obviously inspired by one of the oldest and most familiar schoolyard jokes in academic history. "The Viper Is Coming" originally aired in America on October 24, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Germ A member of the Crimson Guard steals a vial containing Bacteria X. The usual red tape delays delivery of this vial to Destro. In the meantime, the Bacteria X is accidentally mixed with a new growth serum, resulting in a huge, gelatine monstrosity. The G.I. Joe team tries to destroy this hideous new threat, only to succeeding in doubling the danger at hand. Roger Slifer's script is a sly parody of the classic horror cheapie The Blob -- and what an ending! "The Germ" originally aired in America on October 23, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Battle for the Train of Gold Stealing a cassette containing the blueprints of Fort Knox, Cobra concocts a scheme to rob the gold treasury. At the behest of the Bureau of Engraving, the G.I. Joe team works undercover and awaits Cobra's inevitable strike. Though the villains succeed in disabling the Joes' vehicles and weapons, the good guys are able to borrow several of Kentucky's best thoroughbred racing horses during the final counteroffensive. Written by David Carren, "The Battle for the Train of Gold" first aired in America on October 16, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Pyramid of Darkness, Part Four In the fourth episode of the five-part |Pyramid of Darkness, Bazooka and Alpine are rescued by martial artist Quick-Kick, who is prompted recruited into the G.I. Joe team. Continuing in their efforts to regain control of Space Station Delta from Cobra, the Joes end up in a graveyard of sunken ships called the Sea of Lost Souls. Unfortunately, the Cobra team manages to retrieve all four of the elusive control cubes, enabling them to form the all-powerful Pyramid which will give Cobra absolute control of the world -- and the means to destroy G.I. Joe once and for all. Written by Ron Friedman, "Chaos in the Sea of Lost Souls" first aired in America on September 19, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Pyramid of Darkness, Part One Two years after the introductory cartoon miniseries G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero and one year after the following miniseries G.I. Joe: The Revenge of Cobra, the daily animated G.I. Joe series proper commenced with part one of the five-episode adventure |Pyramids of Darkness. The opening chapter, "The Further Adventures of G.I. Joe," was written by Ron Friedman, and was seen in most American markets on September 16, 1985. Things get off to a rousing start as the evil organization Cobra gains control of the G.I. Joe team's Delta space station, using Delta's weapon system to attack Joe headquarters and jam all of earth's electrical devices. Crucial to the action are four control cubes, which when placed in alignment create an all-powerful Pyramid, with which Cobras hopes to rule the world. "The Further Adventures of G.I. Joe" includes such trapping as a wild chase through Enterprise City and a flock of tribble-like creatures called the Fatal Fluffies, who can turn really bad in the wrong hands. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Lasers in the Night Cobra Commander draws up plans to steal the G.I. Joe team's new laser device. The theft is not so much for power as for ego; the Commander intends to create a monument to himself on the Moon. Meanwhile, a romance develops between Quick-Kick and pretty Joe Team trainee Amber, who, predictably, ends up being used as a pawn by the villains. Written by Marv Wolfman, "Lasers in the Night" was originally telecast in America on October 22, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Gamesmaster G.I. Joe team members Lady Jaye and Flint, together with their deadly rivals Cobra Commander and the Baroness, are captured en masse by a looney named the Gamesmaster. The four enemies must join forces to stay alive during a (literal) manhunt on Gamesmaster's gadget-laden private island, which looks deceptively like a huge amusement park. Flint Dille's teleplay was obviously inspired by the classic Richard Connell short story The Most Dangerous Game. "The Gamesmaster" originally aired in the U.S. on October 21, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Where the Reptiles Roam A dude ranch in Western Texas is purchased by one of Cobra's dummy corporations. G.I. Joe team member Wild Bill and his friends now have their hands full trying to keep Cobra from gaining control of the solar energy farm next door to the ranch. When Cobra's weapons prove too powerful, Wild Bill cannily relies upon the unharnessed energy of a good old-fashioned cattle stampede. Written by Gerry and Carla Conway, "Where the Reptiles Roam" first aired in the U.S. on October 18, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Hearts and Cannons G.I. Joes Footloose and Dusty infiltrate Cobra's desert base, where captured scientist Dr. Nancy Winters is being forced to work on a powerful new Plasma Cannon Tank. Rescuing Nancy, the two Joes spend as much time vying for her affections as they do preventing Cobra from putting the Tank into operation. And what about that contentious local character named Jabal? Scripted by Alfred A. Pegel and Larry Houston from a story by Pegel, "Hearts and Cannons" was first broadcast in America on November 14, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Flint's Vacation Joe Team member Flint heads to the new housing project of Please Cove, hoping to spend some quality time with his cousin's family. He soon discovers that the project's inhabitants have been brainwashed and enslaved by Cobra -- and the dreaded Drednoks have been pressed into service as the local police force. Beth Bornstein's teleplay cleverly redefines the old sci-fi film classic Invasion of the Body Snatchers in TV-cartoon terms. "Flint's Vacation" was first telecast in America on November 13, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Primordial Plot Cobra steals a cache of petrified bones, then kidnaps cloning expert Dr. Massey. The result is a newly hatched crop of deadly dinosaurs, which even the Joes are at a loss to contain. And remember, folks, this was several years before the release of Spielberg's Jurassic Park. "Primordial Plot" was written by Donald F. Glut, one of the finest science fiction purveyors working in television. The episode originally aired in America on November 12, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Gods Below Once again, Cobra Commander is in need of quick cash to finance his world-domination scheme. To that end, the Commander lures the Joes into a treasure hunt at the newly excavated tomb of Osiris in Egypt. Things get complicated when the Joes and scientist Dr. Marsh are confronted by the evil Egyptian God Set, who sends them hurtling into the Realm of the Dead. Written by Gordon Kent, "The Gods Below" first aired in America on November 11, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Cobra CLAWs are Coming to Town Christmas is coming and the Joes take upon themselves to distribute used toys to needy children. Unfortunately, the toy supply is infiltrated by Cobra's troops, who have been shrunken to action-figure size. In this reduced state, the villains contrive to sway public sentiment against the good-guy Joes. When all is said and done, however, this episode exists primarily to introduce Hasbro's latest line of G.I. Joe toy products. Scripted by Carla and Gerry Conway from a story by Roy and Dan Thomas, "Cobra CLAWs are Coming to Town" originally aired in America on November 7, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Eau de Cobra The title of this G.I. Joe episode refers to a new brand of perfume, sweet to the smell, but devastating in its effect. The Baroness hopes to ensnare wealthy shipowner Socrates Arties by applying the perfume, which turns males into mind slaves. Alas, the ensuing passions get wildly out of control, thanks to a jealous Destro. Written by Flint Dille, "Eau de Cobra" made its first American TV appearance on November 6, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Excalibur Crash-landing in England's Lake District, Storm Shadow recovers the long-lost Sword Excalibur. This arouses the interest of Destro, who begins laying plans to seize the sword for his own use. Meanwhile, the Joes attempt to forestall future Cobra attacks on England, a task made difficult by the country's habitually unpredictable weather. Written by Dan DiStefano, "Excalibur" first aired in America on November 1, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Bazooka Saw a Sea Serpent Cobra has developed a mechanical sea serpent, which grows in size each time it devours a ship. Unfortunately, the villains lose control of the metallic monstrosity. Swallowing Cobras and Joes alike, the renegade serpent starts making a beeline for helpless New York City. Beany and Cecil this isn't! Written by Mary Skenes, "Bazooka Saw a Sea Serpent" was first telecast in America on October 31, 1985 -- perfect timing for a Halloween prank. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Cobra Quake A new technology has been developed to stop earthquakes before they begin. Cobra reverses that technology, intending to wreak havoc at a Third World Council peace conference in Japan. Assigned to guard the delegates, the Joes end up in a desperate search for Cobra's booby traps in three different, far-flung locations. Written by Ted Pederson, "Cobra Quake" made its first American TV appearance on October 28, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Pyramid of Darkness, Part Five In the concluding episode of the five-part Pyramid of Darkness, Cobra has successfully assembled the Pyramid, which will give them absolute and unquestioned power over the world. Fortunately, the G.I. Joe team manages to escape Cobra's clutches, bearing up against all manner of deadly devices, including an immobilizing heat beam. As the episode races to a conclusion, the viewer is never entirely certain who will emerge triumphant (hint: the coda finds the villains in their characteristic "It's all your fault" mode). Written by Ron Friedman, "Knotting Cobra's Coils" first aired in America on September 20, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Cold Slither The Cobra Commander makes a startling discovery: He can no longer continue his efforts to rule the world because he is flat broke. Hoping to raise money in a hurry, the Commander utilizes the "hidden persuasion" method by hiring Zartan and the Drednoks to pose as musicians, then inserts mind-control messages in the music in order to enslave the group's fans. Alas, even three Joe members fall victim to the booby-trapped tunes. Something of a self-parody, this G.I. Joe episode was written by Charles Michael Hill. Though filmed as the final episode of season one, "Cold Slither" was telecast on December 2, 1985, long before the season finale. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Traitor, Part One In the first episode of a two-part story, a desperate Dusty is coerced into selling information about the G.I. Joes' new bullet-proof chemical armor protection. The recipient of this top-secret information is Cobra, who has promised to pay the medical bills for Dusty's ailing mother. Arrested for treason, Dusty is sprung from prison by the Joes themselves, who believe that extenuating circumstance and not treachery motivated the prisoner's rash actions. But is Dusty genuinely a victim of circumstance, or a villain in disguise? Written by Buzz Dixon, part one of "The Traitor" first aired in America on November 25, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Worlds Without End, Part Two In the conclusion of the two-part "Worlds Without End," Joe team members Flint, Lady Jaye, Airtight, Grunt, Clutch, and Steeler are still trapped in a parallel Earth, still at the mercy of the conquering Cobras. The Joes receive unexpected help from their old nemesis the Baroness -- who has been reinvented as a "good guy," in love with Steeler. Adopting a divide-and-conquer approach, the Baroness and the Joes foment a Cobra civil war. When the dust settles, three of the Joes choose to remain in the parallel world to continue fighting the good fight on behalf of their new confreres. Written by Martin Pasko, part two of "Worlds Without End" first aired in America on November 5, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Captives of Cobra, Part One In the first episode of a two-part story, Cobra kidnaps the family members of the G.I. Joe team, including the parents of Quick Kick, Thunder, and Scarlett. Using mind control, the villains turn their captives against the Joes. It is all part of a scheme to steal some highly explosive crystals created by a misfire chemical reaction. First telecast in America on October 29, 1985, part one of "Captives of Cobra" was written by G.I. Joe stalwart Christy Marx. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Worlds Without End, Part One In this first episode of a two-part adventure, Joe team members Flint, Lady Jaye, Airtight, Grunt, Clutch, and Steeler try to recover a matter transmutor stolen by the Dreadnoks. When the device is accidentally triggered, the Joes are hurled into a bizarre parallel world. Upon getting their bearings, they discover that, in this particular world, the Cobras have emerged triumphant over the Joes -- and the Drednoks are now the police force. Written by Martin Pasko, part one of "Worlds Without End" first aired in America on November 4, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Captives of Cobra, Part Two In the conclusion of a two-part story, several family members of the G.I. Joe team are still being held prisoner by Cobra, who hope to use their captives to retrieve some dangerously explosive chemicals. Team member Scarlett is able to rescue some of the captives -- who, because their minds have been enslaved by Cobra, prove to be almost as dangerous as their captors. Meanwhile, the villains overreach themselves by attempting to nab the extremely self-reliant family of Joe member Gung Ho. Written by Christy Marx, part two of "Captives of Cobra" was originally telecast in America on October 30, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Grey Hair and Growing Pains Serpentor steals Madame Versailles' special formula for making people younger -- or, if used improperly, making them older. Intending to exploit the treatment for his own evil purposes, Serpentor is unwittingly helped along by the vanity of Mme. Versailles' commercial spokespersons. In the course of events, three of the Joes age 50 years, another three team members regress into childhood, and Zarina and Mainframe stage a deadly confrontation. Written by Dave Marconi and Flint Dille, "Grey Hair and Growing Pains" first aired in America on October 14, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: In the Presence of Mine Enemies Joe Team member Slip Stream finds himself stranded on a monster-infested island with a beautiful female StratoViper named Raven. At first, the two natural enemies devote their energies to wiping one another out. But Raven changes her mind when she discovers that she has been set up as a "dead duck" by her leader, the Cobra Commander. Written by Chris Weber and Karen Wilson, "In the Presence of Mine Enemies" originally aired in America on November 19, 1986, as the final second-season episode of G.I. Joe. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Sins of Our Fathers Dismissed from the Joe Team, Dial-Tone is unwittingly plunked in the middle of another power struggle between Cobra Commander and Serpentor. The action shifts to Scotland, ending up at Destro's ancestral castle. Both Joes and Cobras are forced to fight side by side when they are threatened by a horrible monster, summoned from the past. Scripted by Buzz Dixon from a story by Steve Gerber, "Sins of Our Fathers" first aired in America on November 18, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Joe's Night Out Three of the Joes -- Wet Suit, Leatherneck, and Dial-Tone -- accompany their dates to the opening of a trendy new night club. They are subsequently abducted along with all the other patrons when the "club" turns out to be a rocket in disguise, courtesy of Cobra. Hurled into deep space, the hostages will be returned only on condition that research scientist Dr. Melany assist Cobra in developing a powerful new plane engine. First broadcast in America on November 10, 1986, "Joe's Night Out" was written by David Schwartz. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Second Hand Emotions Dr. Mindbender and Serpentor develop an electronic organ capable of manipulating emotions. The villains play the organ at the wedding of LifeLine's sister, hoping thereby to force the Joe Team members into destroying themselves. Something old, something new, something borrowed, and something blue (blew up, that is). Written by Carla and Gerry Conway, "Second Hand Emotions" made its first U.S. television appearance on October 31, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Nightmare Assault The latest Cobra device for deviltry is something called the Somulator. Deploying this device, Dr. Mindbender is able to enter and alter the dreams of the Joe Team members, causing horrible nightmares which result in carelessness and a drop in morale. But the "good" doctor himself falls victim to LowLife's all-too-vivid nightmare, consisting of the combined dreams of the other Joes. Written by Marv Wolfman, "Nightmare Assault" originally aired in America on October 30, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Most Dangerous Thing in the World During General Hawk's absence, Cobra wreaks havoc upon the Joe's computer system. As a result, the troublesome Shipwreck, LifeLine, and Dial-Tone are promoted to the rank of General. Needless to say, the trio is hardly officer material, and it is up to Hawk to undo the ensuing damage -- and to save the weakened Joe force from an all-out Cobra attack. Written by Buzz Dixon, "The Most Dangerous Thing in the World" first aired in America on October 29, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: G.I. Joe and the Golden Fleece At the Suez Canal, the Cobras attempt to recover a valuable golden coil from the wreckage of a crashed UFO. They are confronted by the Joes, and in the ensuing struggle a laser beam is accidentally triggered. Within seconds, Joes and Cobras alike a hurtled back in time to ancient Greece, where they are welcomed and worshipped as gods. Scripted by Richard Merwin from a story by Flint Dille, "G.I. Joe and the Golden Fleece" first aired in the U.S. on October 27, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Ninja Holiday Attending a martial arts competition, Joe Team member Sgt. Slaughter is "chosen" by a group of sinister ninjas for a special assignment. Unwillingly submitting himself to rigorous training, Sarge discovers that he has been selected to assassinate Cobra Emperor Serpentor. During the climactic chase, the Joe team faces opposition from a variety of martial-arts experts, many of whom are dressed like Village People rejects! Written by Michael Charles Hill, "Ninja Holiday" originally aired in the U.S. on October 22, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Part Five In the concluding chapter of a five-part adventure, the worst has happened: Dr. Mindbender has successfully melded the DNA of several past conquerors into a single, super-powered Cobra Emperor named Serpentor. Fortunately, Sgt. Slaughter and the rest of the G.I. Joe team manage to escape their Cobra captors and to mount a counteroffensive. Without giving away the ending, it can be noted that enough Joe and Cobra members are left standing to populate the subsequent episodes of G.I. Joe's second TV season. Written by Buzz Dixon, "Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Pt. 5" first aired in America on September 19, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Part Four In the fourth chapter of a five-part adventure, Cobra has successfully captured several members of the new G.I. Joe team. Dr. Mindbender is now certain that he can continue his plans to create a powerful Cobra Emperor named Serpentor unimpeded. Altering his scheme a bit, Mindbender is now determined to use Sgt. Slaughter's DNA in the creation process. Written by Buzz Dixon, "Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Pt. 4" first aired in America on September 18, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Part Three In the third chapter of a five-part adventure, the Joes run into danger in all corners of the world. Beach Head and Mainframe encounter trouble at Dracula's castles; Duke is jeopardized at Genghis Khan's tomb; Shipwreck is nearly scuttled at Alexander the Great's underwater crypt; and Sgt. Slaughter is captured near Sun Tzu's burial mound. On the "plus" side, the Joes finally discover that Cobra intends to use the DNA from past conquerors to create an omnipotent Cobra Emperor named Serpentor. Written by Buzz Dixon, "Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Pt. 3" first aired in America on September 17, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Part Two In the second chapter of a five-part adventure, the new G.I. Joe team scurries all over the world, trying to prevent Cobra from raiding the sacred resting places of such past leaders as Napoleon, Alexander the Great, and Ivan the Terrible. The heroes run into a great deal of interference, not only from Cobra but also from local politicians and bureaucrats. Meanwhile, Dr. Mindbender begins the process of assembling the new, all-powerful Cobra Emperor Serpentor. Written by Buzz Dixon, "Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Pt. 2" first aired in America on September 16, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Part One Season two of G.I. Joe was launched in America on September 15, 1986, with the first episode of the five-part adventure |Arise, Serpentor, Arise. Fed up with Cobra Commander's bungling, Dr. Mindbender decides to create a new, all-powerful Cobra Emperor, using the DNA of such past conquerers as Napoleon, Genghis Khan, Alexander the Great, Ivan the Terrible, and Sun Tzu. It is up to the brand-new G.I. Joe team to stop Mindbender in his tracks, but first, they have to figure out exactly what he is up to. "Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Pt. 1" was written by Buzz Dixon. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Spy That Rooked Me Also known as "The Spy Who Rooked Me," this episode focuses on a world-famous, Bond-like secret agent named Matthew Burke. After rescuing Joe team members Flint, Lady Jaye, Dial-Tone, and Cross-Country, Burke agrees to help them deliver some deadly nerve gas -- and, incidentally, to elude the diabolical Dr. Mindbender. Alas, Burke is so wrapped up in his own mistake that he nearly messes up the mission. Written with tongue firmly in cheek by Susan K. Williams, "The Spy That Rooked Me" originally aired in America on October 13, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Glamour Girls Desperately desiring eternal youth, Madame Veil relies upon the sinister resourcefulness of Cobra. The villains kidnap dozens of beautiful fashion models, intending to tap their youthfulness on behalf of Mme. Veil. The Joes go to the rescue, receiving unexpected help from one of the abducted models: Lowlight's own sister Una. Beth Bornstein's teleplay is more than a little beholden to the Georges Franju horror film Eyes Without a Face, especially near the end of the story. "Glamour Girls" made its American TV debut on October 8, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Cobrathon Cobra is in dire need of an expensive computer virus designed to cripple the records of law enforcement agencies throughout the world. But rather than pay for the device in the normal fashion, the villains choose to put on a pay-per-view telethon, staged in a hellish casino. In this perverse twist on the Jerry Lewis oeuvre, the telethon's "entertainment" includes the ritual torture of Joe members Sci-Fi and Lifeline. Written by Martin Pasko and Rebecca Parr, "Cobrathon" first aired in America on October 6, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Sink the Montana The unexpected catalyst for this episode is Admiral George Lattimer of the U.S. Navy. Unwilling to allow his beloved USS Montana to be scrapped, the admiral joins force with Cobra's Destro turns against the United States. The Joes must prevent Lattimer from using his obsolete but still-deadly battleship from destroying the entire Atlantic Fleet. Written by David Carren, "Sink the Montana" first aired in America on September 29, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Raise the Flagg! The Joes and the Cobras race against other to salvage the remains of the sunken aircraft carrier U.S.S. Flagg. The Joes get to the wreckage first, only to discover it is inhabited by a demented Cobra chef. In addition to deadly gastronomic efforts, the Joes must also contend with some BATs and an antimatter energy pod. Written by David Carren, "Raise the Flagg!" made its first American TV appearance on October 20, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: My Brother's Keeper Wheelchair-bound physicist Jeremy Penser allows himself to be duped by Cobra. In exchange for regaining the use of his legs, Dr. Penser agrees to help develop Cobra's latest weapon of destruction. So blindsided does Penser become that he nearly seals the doom of his own younger brother Timothy -- not to mention practically every member of the G.I. Joe team. Written by Buzz Dixon, "My Brother's Keeper" originally aired in America on October 15, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Iceberg Goes South Joe Team member Iceberg visits his girlfriend, Mahia, at her uncle's "Tropodome," a tropical biodome. Little does he suspect that Cobra's Dr. Mindbender is using the building as headquarters for his latest batch of diabolical genetic experiments. By the time the rest of the Joes show up, Iceberg has been converted into a hideous mutant. Written by Mary Skrenes, "Iceberg Goes South" first aired in America on October 9, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Rotten Egg Invited to be the guest of honor at a military academy, Leatherneck discovers that the institution is under the command of Cobra. Worse still, the head of the academy is a fugitive criminal named McCann -- who, as a raw Marine grunt, had been trained by Leatherneck at Parris Island. Seeking revenge for being booted from the service, Leatherneck is determined to use his own military strategy to destroy his former mentor. Written by Steve Mitchell and Barbara Petty, "The Rotten Egg" originally aired in America on October 7, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Million Dollar Medic LifeLine rescues Bree Van Mark, daughter of a wealthy industrialist, from a watery grave. To show her gratitude, Bree showers the reluctant LifeLine with expensive gifts -- including a gold-plated helicopter. Inevitably, the girl becomes a pawn in the latest Cobra scheme. Celebrated cartoon voice-over director Susan Blu is heard as Bree. Written by Carla and Gerry Conway, "Million Dollar Medic" first aired in America on October 2, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Once Upon a Joe... During a pitched battle between the Cobras and the Joes, an orphanage is accidentally destroyed, though the children emerge unscathed. As a new building is constructed, Shipwreck tries to keep the kids entertained, all the while endeavoring to prevent Zartan from recovering a lost Cobra weapon, the mysterious McGuffin Device (scriptwriter Buzz Dixon certainly knows his Hitchcock). The plot is partially resolved by orphan girl Jenny, who in many respects is quicker on the uptake than the Joes. "Once Upon a Joe..." originally aired in the U.S. on October 1, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Let's Play Soldier In Bangkok, Leatherneck takes charge of four "dust children," street orphans fathered by American GIs. Meanwhile, Cobra tries to enslave the population of Thailand by distributing chewing gum laced with Dr. Mindbender's latest mind-paralysis drug. As if that wasn't enough of a complication, the duplicitous Zarana leads the G.I. Joe team into another trap. Written by Sharman Di Vono, "Let's Play Soldier" first aired in the U.S. on September 30, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Computer Complications Cobra operative Zarana breaks into Joe headquarters, there to steal an antimatter deposit. Her plans are altered when she meets and falls in love with Joe team member Mainframes. Orders are orders, and Zarana has been ordered to kill Mainframe. David Schwartz's teleplay is chock-full of clever and unexpected plot twists. "Computer Complications" was first telecast in America on September 26, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Last Hour to Doomsday Cobra's latest weapon is the Vortex Cone, which plays havoc with the ocean's magnetic currents to cause huge tidal waves all over the world. Thus armed, the Cobra leader threatens to wipe out the entire East Coast if his demands are not meant. In their efforts to foil the villains, the Joe Teams deploys such strategies as having Lady Jaye impersonate the Baroness. Written by Tom Degenais, "Last Hour to Doomsday" originally aired in America on September 25, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: My Favorite Things Serpentor leads a band of Cobras in stealing the historical relics which, when assembled, form the DNA for Serpentor's personality matrix. The villains' problem: They must wrest these relics away from the even nastier despots who currently possess them. Meanwhile, Joe team member Wet-Suit learns a valuable lesson about self-control -- and nearly meets disaster in the castle of the original Count Dracula. Written by Doug Booth, "My Favorite Things" originally aired in America on October 16, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Into Your Tent I Will Silently Creep Joe team member Cross Country stumbles upon a Cobra slave labor camp. The captives are toiling on behalf of Cobra Commander, who needs enough money to thwart Serpentor's latest power play. The story's "maguffin" is a missing computer disk, over which a lot of fuss is stirred. Some good "mutant" character design and animation distinguishes this episode, which was written by Buzz Dixon and Michael Charles Hill. "Into Your Tent I Will Silently Creep" was the final episode of G.I. Joe, though not the final one to be telecast: Its original American air date was November 20, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Not a Ghost of a Chance Three Cobra members go on Hector Ramirez's TV show "Twenty Questions," ostensibly to clear themselves of charges that he destroyed the prototype for a new stealth bomber. Meanwhile, the Joes try to rescue the bombers' missing pilots. Their efforts -- and the ultimate unmasking of Cobra as the scoundrels that they really are -- is almost undermined by Joe team member Flint's personal demons. Written by Sharmon Di Vono, "Not a Ghost of a Chance" was first telecast in America on November 13, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide
  • House: Season One

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Nov 10, 2009

    Includes:House: The Socratic Method (2004) House: Occam's Razor (2004) House: Pilot (2004) House: Paternity (2004) House: Maternity (2004) House: Fidelity (2004) House: Damned if You Do (2004) House: Detox (2005) House: MOB Rules (2005) House: Kids (2005) House: Control (2005) House: Heavy (2005) House: Role Model (2005) House: Babies and Bathwater (2005) House: Love Hurts (2005) House: Honeymoon (2005) House: Three Stories (2005) House: Poison (2005) House: DNR (2005) House: Histories (2005) House: Sports Medicine (2005) House: Cursed (2005) House: The Socratic Method Throwing himself into his work to get his mind off his birthday, House (Hugh Laurie) is intrigued when diagnosed schizophrenic Lucille Palmeiro (Stacy Edwards) has a pulmonary embolism at the unusually young age of 38. In fact, he's so intrigued that he breaks his own self-imposed rule and tries to talk to the woman at her home--where her 15-year-old son Luke (Aaron Himelstein) seems to know a lot more than he's saying. Elsewhere, Chase (Jesse Spencer) has serious issues with his past. This episode affords a rare opportunity to hear Hugh Laurie speak in his authentic British accent. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide House: Occam's Razor After calling in sick at work, 22-year-old college student Brandon (Kevin Zegers) spends the morning having wild sex with his fiancee--and then lapses into unconsciousness. It's obvious to Dr. House (Hugh Laurie) that Brandon wasn't lying about being sick, but his symptoms are mysterious and contradictory--and worse, they keep multiplying. As he tries to figure out this puzzle, House saves time by treating all of his other patients in a record five minutes. All in all, not a bad day's work for the clinic's most obstreperous doctor, even though House is taken down a peg or two by his supervisor Dr. Cuddy (Lisa Edelstein), who sharkishly informs him that he will never get her goat no matter how hard he tries! ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide House: Pilot The alternate title for this pilot episode of House is "Everybody Lies", which neatly sums up the philosophy of the brilliant but thoroughly obnoxious Dr. Gregory House (Hugh Laurie), infectious disease and nephrology specialist at Princton-Plainsboro Teaching Hospital. Convinced that none of his patients will ever tell him the truth, House responds in kind by refusing to talk to them beyond the bare necessities--and he certainly wastes no time being friendly, comforting or supportive. Right now, House's patented indifference is being directed at 29-year-old kindergarten teacher Rebecca Adler (Robin Tunney), who for no discernible reason has begun suffering seizures and speaking gibberish. With no one else able to figure out what's happening to Rebecca, House dismisses it as a brain tumor. It turns out that he's wrong--and also that he'll spend a lot more time than he'd originally intended trying to save Rebecca's life, and to ascertain the real cause for her behavior (which, as often happens in this series,turns out to be a malady that no one could possibly have anticipated). But though House emerges as the hero of the piece, he remains his old gloriously repulsive self. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide House: Paternity Suffering from double vision and horrible nightmares, 16-year-old Dan (Scott Mechlowitz) traces the source of his problem to injuries sustained during a Lacrosse match. As usual, Dr. House (Hugh Laurie) has other ideas, first diagnosing Dan with MS, and then declaring that the boy is being sexually abused. By the time House has figured out the real reason (maybe!) and has scheduled Dan for brain surgery, the boy disappears from the clinic--and the chase is on. Elsewhere, House is annoyed by a ditzy mom (Kylee Cochran) who refuses to let her baby be vaccinated, and by a patient (Alex Skuby) with an ugly abscess in his knee who is threatening to sue everyone within earshot. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide House: Maternity After checking on two neonatal infants who have suffered mysterious seizures, House (Hugh Laurie) concludes that the clinic has become the breeding ground for a deadly epidemic--which is rapidly spreading to the other newborns. In order to isolate the reason for this outbreak and to stop it in its tracks, House is faced with a difficult choice: One of the babies will have to die to save the others. As it turns out, the source of the epidemic has little to do with babies, but neither House nor the audience finds this out until the very last moment. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide House: Fidelity 31-year-old Elyce Snow (Myndy Crist) sleeps eighteen hours a day, and is impossible to get along with the other six hours. House (Hugh Laurie) thinks it might be depression, but it isn't, nor is it rabbit fever (his second choice). Finally, House diagnoses African Sleeping Sickness--and since neither Elyce nor her husband Ed (Dominic Purcell) has ever been to Africa, the only other possibility is that one of them has been unfaithful. But neither husband nor wife will fess up...not even if their silence results in her quick demise! ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide House: Damned if You Do It's Christmas time in the clinic, but there's no occasion for joy when Sister Mary Augustine is brought, apparently suffering from stigmata. Figuring that it is nothing more than an allergy, House treats the nun accordingly--and as a result she nearly suffocates. As the other nuns set up a prayer vigil (much to House's annoyance), the clues to solving this medical mystery are painstakingly pieced together, leading unexpectedly to an incident in the Sister's distant past. Elsewhere, a man in a Santa suit (Dakin Matthews) is suffering from an inflamed bowel, which can only be cured by smoking cigarettes. Ho ho ho! ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide House: Detox House (Hugh Laurie) looks into the case of sixteen-year-old Keith Foster (Nicholas D'Agosto), who has been bleeding uncontrollably ever since he was involved in a car crash. Unless House can interpret the contradictory symptoms, it's a safe bet that Keith will never see seventeen. While all this is unfolding, House is doing his damnedest to stay off his precious Vicodin for a whole month, determined to prove to Dr. Cuddy (Lisa Edelstein) that he's not addicted to the stuff--and as result, his judgment is clouded to the point that young Keith may be in more danger than before! ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide House: MOB Rules A typically truculent House (Hugh Laurie) is slapped with a court order instructing him to determine if mobster Joey Arnello (Joseph Lyle Taylor), who is slated to give testimony in Federal Court before entering the Witness Protection Program, is faking a serious illness. Joey's knuckle-busting brother Bill (Danny Nucci) warns House to lay off the case--but not for the (seemingly) obvious reasons. At the same time, Vogler (Chi McBride) puts extra pressure on Cuddy (Lisa Edelstein) to fire House, or risk losing a $100 million donation. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide House: Kids At the height of a meningitis outbreak, House (Hugh Laurie) must figure out how to properly treat a 12-year-old girl (Skye McCole Bartusiak) who has all the symptoms of the disease, but not the disease itself. Cuddy (Lisa Edelstein) insists that House has no time for individual treatment of any patient, but that doesn't stop him from taking stabs at several diagnoses--each one more inaccurate than the last, and all because the girl won't tell him the whole truth. Meanwhile, Cuddy seeks a replacement for the departed Cameron (Jennifer Morrison), but the prospects are a pathetic lot indeed. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide House: Control Chi McBride makes his first series appearance as billionaire entrepreneur Edward Vogler, the new chairman of the board at Princeton-Plainsboro. Assuming that his position gives him license to call all the shots, Vogler wastes no time throwing his weight around--beginning with his promise to donate $100 million to the clinic on the condition that Dr. House (Hugh Laurie) is fired immediately! Things don't get any better for House when he is forced to resort to subterfuge to provide proper treatment for 32-year-old cosmetics CEO Carly Fontano (Sarah Chalke), who for no apparent reason has suddenly become paralyzed. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide House: Heavy Vogler (Chi McBride) cuts a deal with Cuddy (Lisa Edelstein), agreeing to postpone the dismissal of Dr. House (Hugh Laurie). But there's a price to pay for this concession: House must immediately fire one member of his team. As tension mounts among House's coworkers, they still find time to look into the case of an obese 10-year-old (Jennifer Simms) who has suffered a heart attack--but not because of her extra poundage. Another overweight patient (Lucille Hernandez) lies to both House and her husband regarding what may be a malignant tumor...or a unborn child. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide House: Role Model Faced with the choice of firing one of his team or losing his own job, House (Hugh Laurie) is given a way out by Vogler (Chi McBride). If he will give a speech on behalf of a new drug developed by Vogler's pharamaceutical firm, House will be completely off the hook. The upshot of all this only serves to deepen the animosity between House and Vogler--but in the meantime, the doctor must tend to the business at hand, including a senator (Joe Morton) with presidential aspirations who is diagnosed with AIDS, and a young woman (Missy Crider) who insists that she can't have suffered a miscarriage because she hasn't had sex in over a year. As expected, both of these patients will soon develop a whole set of confusing and contradictory symptoms...but no one expects the startling turn of events at episode's end! ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide House: Babies and Bathwater Already irked by the resignation of Cameron (Jennifer Morrison), House (Hugh Laurie) must also endure the persecution of board chairman Vogler (Chi McBride), who demands that House be fired immediately or the clinic will lose his $100 million donation. At long last, Cuddy (Lisa Edelstein) takes a stand against the tyrannical Vogler--but will she regret her rash behavior? Meanwhile, House and his team deal with such patients as a 39-year-old pregnant woman (Marin Hinkle) who must choose between choking to death or terminating a pregnant, and a low-weight baby whose strict vegan diet has prompted Social Services to file child-abuse charges against her parents. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide House: Love Hurts Cameron (Jennifer Morrison) agrees to return to the clinic on one condition: House (Hugh Laurie) must take her out on a dinner date. As the rest of the staffers place bets as to the outcome of this auspicious social event, the clinic treats a young stroke victim (John Cho) whose condition may be the result of a mistake on the part of House--or it may be due to the patient's rather kinky "personal guru" (Christina Cox). Elsewhere, House must play counselor to a pair of senior citizens (Peter Graves June Squibb) who are squabbling over the man's heightened post-Viagra sex drive! ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide House: Honeymoon House (Hugh Laurie) is flummoxed by the plight of his ex-girlfriend Stacy Warner (Sela Ward), who can't understand why her husband Mark (Currie Graham) is suffering from abdominal pains and mood swings--nor why Mark is vividly recalling events during his honeymoon that never actually happened! It's not stress, and it's not Alzheimers...but it could be fatal if House makes the wrong diagnosis. As this final episode of House's first season approaches its cliffhanger climax, it looks as if there still may be a few romantic sparks between the ill-tempered doctor and his former sweetheart. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide House: Three Stories Sela Ward makes her first appearance as Stacy Warner, former lawyer for the Princeton-Plainsboro clinic--and ex-girlfriend of Dr. House (Hugh Laurie). Stacy's husband has fallen mysteriously ill, and she hopes that House can find out why. But House seems more preoccupied with delivering a lecture to three medical-school diagnostics--an assignment he was forced to accept, but one which he tackles with his usual mean-spirited gusto. As he presents the trio with a hypothetic medical dilemma involving three patients with aching legs, we are treated to a succession of bizarre fantasy sequences. Carmen Electra appears as herself in this episode, which won both an Emmy award (for "best writing") and the Humanitas Prize. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide House: Poison While taking the AP Calculus exam, high-school student Matt Davis (John Patrrick Amedori) collapses. Discovering that Matt has been lethally poisoned, House (Hugh Laurie) suspects that the boy has been doing drugs at home. When another student exhibits the same symptoms, however, it is obvious that the source of the poison is the school testing room--but how can this be? Meanwhile, another clinic patient, 82-year-old Georgia Adams (Shirley Knight), suddenly develops an uncontrollable sex drive...and an insatiable lust for Dr. House! ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide House: DNR Legendary jazz musician John Henry Giles (Harry Lennix) collapses during a recording session. After Giles' own doctor Marty Hamilton (David Conrad) diagnoses the dread disease ALS, the musician hastily signs a "do not resuscitate" form. Naturally, House (Hugh Laurie) ignores this document, and as a result ends up in court--just as Giles begins to exhibit inexplicable signs of recovery! Meanwhile, Dr. Hamilton tries to persuade his former pupil Dr. Foreman (Omar Epps) to leave New Jersey and join him in a lucrative West Coast partnership. Pop star Brandy appears as herself. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide House: Histories A homeless, unidentified woman (Leslie Hope) collapses during a run-in with the police, then suffers a seizure at the clinic. Foreman (Omar Epps) thinks that the woman is faking illness to get free room and board, while Wilson (Robert Sean Leonard) insists that she has ovarian cancer. Typically, House trumps them both with a theory of his own, and as a bonus figures out the woman's true identity--much to the fascination of two wide-eyed medical students who've been following House around all day. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide House: Sports Medicine Pro baseball pitcher Hank Wiggen (Scott Foley) insists he is not a drug user, but the evidence indicates otherwise: His bones are brittle to the point of disintegration, and his kidneys have started to fail. Astonishingly, the clinic's lab test indicate that Wiggen is not currently on steroids, nor is he suffering from cancer as the symptoms might also suggest. House (Hugh Laurie) must figure out what's really wrong with Wiggen before the ballplayer's girlfriend Lola (Meredith Monroe) aborts her pregnancy in order to donate her kidneys. And in another development, Foreman (Omar Epps) is secretly dating a sexy drug representative (Salli Richardson-Whitfield), while Wilson (Robert Sean Leonard) is seeing one of House's former lovers. Somehow or other, this all winds up at a monster-truck rally! ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide House: Cursed After developing a rash and several symptoms of pneumonia, 12-year-old Gabriel Reilich (Daryl Sabara) concludes that his Ouija board is right, and that he has been "cursed." House (Hugh Laurie), of course, is certain that there is a more logical answer, but to get that answer he'll have to penetrate the wall of silence erected by Gabriel's wealthy and powerful father (Nestor Carbonell). Meanwhile, Chase (Jeff Spencer) is none too pleased when his rheumotologist father (Patrick Bachau) flies in from Australia--especially when Chase Sr. seems to hit it off with House! ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide
  • Farscape: The Complete Series

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Nov 17, 2009

    Includes:Farscape: PK Tech Girl (1999) Farscape: That Old Black Magic (1999) Farscape: A Bug's Life (1999) Farscape: Til the Blood Runs Clear (1999) Farscape: Through the Looking Glass (1999) Farscape: Throne for a Loss (1999) Farscape: They've Got a Secret (1999) Farscape: The Flax (1999) Farscape: Thank God It's Friday...Again (1999) Farscape: Rhapsody in Blue (1999) Farscape: Premiere (1999) Farscape: Jeremiah Crichton (1999) Farscape: I, E.T. (1999) Farscape: Exodus from Genesis (1999) Farscape: Durka Returns (1999) Farscape: DNA Mad Scientist (1999) Farscape: Back and Back and Back to the Future (1999) Farscape: A Human Reaction (1999) Farscape: A Clockwork Nebari (2000) Farscape: Family Ties (2000) Farscape: Dream a Little Dream (2000) Farscape: My Three Crichtons (2000) Farscape: Mind the Baby (2000) Farscape: Look at the Princess, Part 1: A Kiss is But a Kiss (2000) Farscape: Liars, Guns and Money, Part 1: A Not So Simple Plan (2000) Farscape: Home on the Remains (2000) Farscape: Die Me, Dichotomy (2000) Farscape: Crackers Don't Matter (2000) Farscape: Bone to Be Wild (2000) Farscape: Beware of Dog (2000) Farscape: Liars, Guns and Money, Part 3: Plan B (2000) Farscape: Liars, Guns and Money, Part 2: With Friends Like These (2000) Farscape: Look at the Princess, Part 3: The Maltese Crichton (2000) Farscape: Look at the Princess, Part 2: I Do, I Think (2000) Farscape: Won't Get Fooled Again (2000) Farscape: Vitas Mortis (2000) Farscape: The Way We Weren't (2000) Farscape: The Ugly Truth (2000) Farscape: The Locket (2000) Farscape: The Hidden Memory (2000) Farscape: Taking the Stone (2000) Farscape: Picture If You Will (2000) Farscape: Out of Their Minds (2000) Farscape: Nerve (2000) Farscape: Eat Me (2001) Farscape: Green-Eyed Monster (2001) Farscape: Relativity (2001) Farscape: Scratch 'n' Sniff (2001) Farscape: Self-Inflicted Wounds, Part 1 - Could'a, Would'a, Should'a (2001) Farscape: Infinite Possibilities, Part 2: Icarus Abides (2001) Farscape: Self-Inflicted Wounds, Part 2 - Wait for the Wheel (2001) Farscape: ...Different Destinations (2001) Farscape: The Choice (2001) Farscape: Thanks for Sharing (2001) Farscape: Suns and Lovers (2001) Farscape: Season of Death (2001) Farscape: Revenging Angel (2001) Farscape: Incubator (2001) Farscape: Losing Time (2001) Farscape: Meltdown (2001) Farscape: Infinite Possibilities, Part 1:Daedalus Demands (2001) Farscape: Fractures (2001) Farscape: Crichton Kicks (2002) Farscape: Terra Firma (2002) Farscape: Kansas (2002) Farscape: Twice Shy (2002) Farscape: Unrealized Reality (2002) Farscape: Coup By Clam (2002) Farscape: A Prefect Murder (2002) Farscape: I Shrink, Therefore I Am (2002) Farscape: What Was Lost, Part 2: Resurrection (2002) Farscape: Into the Lion's Den, Part 2: Wolf in Sheep's Clothing (2002) Farscape: What Was Lost, Part 1: Sacrifice (2002) Farscape: Promises (2002) Farscape: Natural Election (2002) Farscape: Lava's a Many Splendored Thing (2002) Farscape: John Quixote (2002) Farscape: Into the Lion's Den, Part 1: Lambs to the Slaughter (2002) Farscape: I-Yensch, You-Yensch (2002) Farscape: Dog with Two Bones (2002) Farscape: Bringing Home the Beacon (2003) Farscape: A Constellation of Doubt (2003) Farscape: Bad Timing (2003) Farscape: We're So Screwed, Part 1: Fetal Attraction (2003) Farscape: We're So Screwed, Part 3: La Bomba (2003) Farscape: We're So Screwed, Part 2: Hot to Katratzi (2003) Farscape: Prayer (2003) Farscape: Mental as Anything (2003) Farscape: PK Tech Girl During their efforts to salvage the wreckage of infamous PeaceKeeper vessel Zelbinon, Moya's crew members come across the abandoned PK technician Gilina (Alyssa-Jane Cook). Aeryn (Claudia Black) experience the pangs of jealousy when Gilina evinces fondness for Crichton (Ben Browder)--But this dilemma is minor compared to the greater threat of the Sheyang scavenger team which hopes to claim Zelbinon for itself. Meanwhile, Rygel (Jonathan Hardy) experiences hellish flashbacks of the torture he endured at the hands of Zelbinon's Captain Durka (David Wheeler). The 7th Farscape episode filmed, "PK Tech Girl was the 5th to be shown, making its TV debut on April 16, 1999. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: That Old Black Magic While visiting a commerce planet, Crichton (Ben Browder) falls under the power of vampiric sorceror Maldis (Chris Haywood). Transported to a metaphysical limbo, Crichton ends up locked in gladitorial combat with his mortal enemy, Capt. Crais (Lani Tupu) It is up to Zhaan (Virginia Hey) to save Crichton and vanquish Maldis--but the personal price for her bravery may be more than she is willing to pay. "That Old Black Magic" originally aired on June 11, 1999. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: A Bug's Life To prevent a Marauder crew from taking over Moya, Crichton (Ben Browder) poses as a PeaceKeeper captain. But even if this subterfuge works, the crew may have no defense against a hyper-intelligent virus that has festered on the Marauder's ship. As the virus hops from one host body to the next, a trail of death and destruction is left in its wake. "A Bug's Life" made its first U.S. television appearance on September 17, 1999. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Til the Blood Runs Clear In their efforts to create a prototype wormhole, Crichton (Ben Browder) and Aeryn (Claudia Black) inadvertently damages the Farscape 1 module. Landing on the Dambaba Depot for repairs, the two crew members run afoul of the Bloodtracker, bounty hunters hired by PeaceKeeper captain Crais to recapture Zhaan (Virginia Hey), D'Argo (Anthony Simcoe), and Rydel (Jonathan Hardy). Despite the imminent danger, Zhaan finds time to revel in the euphoria of solar flares. "Til the Blood Runs Clear" originally aired on July 9, 1999. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Through the Looking Glass Moya's erratic and unpredictable behavior can mean only one thing: The huge, living starship is pregnant. In her efforts to put the crew's mind at ease about her condition, Moya ends up stranding them in a nightmarish limbo. As Crichton (Ben Browder) attempts to repair the damage with some interdimensional surgery, his fellow crew members seem to evaporate before his eyes -- while Moya is multiplied by four. "Through the Looking Glass" originally aired on September 10, 1999. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Throne for a Loss During a standard commerce exchange, the duplicitous Dominar Rygel XVI (Jonathan Hardy) steals an important component of Moya -- only to be "stolen" himself by a band of Tavlek pirates. More out of concern for the component than for Rygel, crew members Crichton (Ben Browder), Aeryn (Claudia Black), and D'Argo (Anthony Simcoe) formulate a rescue plan. Unfortunately, the Tavlek have the added advantage of an adrenalin-enhancing drug -- which, in turn, has bizarre side effects on Moya's crew. "Throne for a Loss" originally aired on April 9, 1999. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: They've Got a Secret D'Argo (Anthony Simcoe) manages to destroy one of the few remaining PeaceKeeper devices on the living starship Moya -- only to cause an inexplicable reaction which blows him into space. Rescued by Aeryn (Claudia Black), D'Argo returns to Moya in a highly agitated and extremely paranoid state, convinced that fellow crew member Crichton (Ben Browder) is a murderer. Adding to this burden, Moya begins to malfunction in a terrifying fashion. "They've Got a Secret" first aired on June 25, 1999. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: The Flax Aeryn (Claudia Black) and Crichton (Ben Browder) are trapped in the Flax, an energy net controlled by space pirates. Zhaan (Virginia Hey) and Rygel (Jonathan Hardy) try to bargain for the return of their comrades without resorting to violence. It turns out that only D'Argo (Anthony Simcoe) will be able to rescue Moya's crew -- but he may bypass this opportunity and abandon his friends in favor of returning to his homeworld. "The Flax" was first telecast on July 16, 1999. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Thank God It's Friday...Again Moya's crew bids a reluctant farewell to D'Argo (Anthony Simcoe), who has elected to stay behind on the Utopian planet Sykar. But there is something very strange about this so-called paradise. For one thing, the entirely population's well-being seems to hinge upon a strange root called Tannot; for another, there is literally no "tomorrow" on Sykar's calender. Things get stranger still when a series of bizarre physical and mental changes manifest themselves within three of the crew members. "Thank God It's Friday...Again" first aired on April 23, 1999. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Rhapsody in Blue Moya and her crew are lured to a Delvian Colony by a false distress call. It turns out that they have been summoned on behalf of ailing Delvian ruler Tahleen (Kate Raison), whose life can be saved only by one of her own lineage -- namely, Princess Zhaan (Virginia Hey). In her efforts to do her royal duty, Zhaan goes insane, and her madness spreads to the rest of the crew. To rescue his comrades, and to prevent Tahleen from irretrievably capturing Zhaan's soul, Crichton (Ben Browder) must participate in Unity, a dangerous Delvian ritual. "Rhapsody in Blue" first aired on July 23, 1999. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Premiere While testing an experimental spacecraft, Commander John Crichton (Ben Browder) is pulled through a wormhole and literally sucked into the middle of a raging conflict in another galaxy thousands of light years from earth. Ending up on Moya, a living starship designed to transport the alien prisoners of the mercenary human PeaceKeepers, Crichton is forced to join a crew comprised of prison escapees, including anarchistic Delvian princess Pa'u Zotoh Zhaan (Virginia Hey), hostile Luxan warrior Ka D'Argo (Anthony Simcoe), and exiled Hynerian despot Dominar Rygel XVI (Jonathan Hardy). Also on board Moya is renegade PeaceKeeper Aeryn Sun (Claudia Black), who can no longer return to their own people. In hot pursuit of the escapees is PeaceKeeper Captain Bialar Crais (Lani Tupu), who also seeks vengeance against Crichton for inadvertently killing Crais' brother. With this 90-minute premiere episode, the weekly saga of Farscape began on March 19, 1999. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Jeremiah Crichton Thanks to another of Moya's unexpected starbursts, Crichton (Ben Browder) is stranded in space while riding Farscape 1. Entering into the energy pull of the earthlike planet Acquira, Crichton at first enjoys his new home so much that he is reluctant to leave. By the time he realizes that Acquira is no paradise, Crichton's fellow crew members, D'Argo (Anthony Simcoe) and Rygel (Jonathan Hardy), have landed on the planet, where, as a result of a misunderstanding, Rygel is hailed as the long-anticipated Acquiran savior. Alas, if the locals find out who he really is, Rygel will be executed -- as will the rest of Moya's crew. "Jeremiah Crichton" first aired on July 30, 1999. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: I, E.T. The crew makes the disturbing discovery that the PeaceKeepers have planted a locator beacon -- or tracking device -- somewhere on the living starship Moya. It is now necessary to perform surgery on the vessel, but the only practical anesthetic is located on a hostile planet that has never experienced extraterrestrial contact. In his efforts to obtain the anesthetic, Crichton realizes anew that he is truly a stranger in a strange land. The second Farscape episode filmed, "I, E.T." was the seventh to be shown, making its broadcast bow on May 7, 1999. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Exodus from Genesis Still escaping from the PeaceKeepers, the living starship Moya and her crew are shielded from detection by an instellar phenomenon, the handiwork of an insectoid race called the Drak. Partly out of necessity, partly out of gratitude, the crew agrees to protect the Drak queen during her spawning period. Unfortunately, the queen can only deposit her eggs under extremely high temperatures -- so high that they may prove fatal to renegade PeaceKeeper Aeryn Sun (Claudia Black). The third filmed episode of Farscape, "Exodus From Genesis" was the second episode to be broadcast, on March 26, 1999. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Durka Returns A damaged ship belonging to the powerful, pacifistic Nebari race is brought aboard Moya for repairs. One of the passengers is the infamous Captain Durka (David Wheeler), who had earlier overseen the fiendish torture of Rygel (Jonathan Hardy), but who now claims to be totally purged of his evil ways. Another passenger is the criminal Chiana, who falls under suspicion when her Nebari captor is murdered -- a killing that also causes the "reformed" Durka to revert to his nasty old self. Gigi Edgley makes her first Farscape appearance as Chiana in this episode, which originally aired on August 13, 1999. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: DNA Mad Scientist Alien scientist NamTar (enacted by Adrian Getley, with voice provided by Julian Gartner) offers to show Zhaan (Virginia Hey), D'Argo (Anthony Simcoe), and Rygel (Jonathan Hardy) the way back to their various homeworlds. In exchange, NamTar demands one of Pilot's arms. At first agreeable, the three crew members uncontrollably lapse into blatant hostility and greed -- while Aeryn (Claudia Black) learns the hard way that NamTar has a hidden agenda. "DNA Mad Scientist" was first telecast on June 18, 1999. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Back and Back and Back to the Future When he rescues two Ilanic scientists, D'Argo (Anthony Simcoe) causes dissension in the ranks of Moya's crew. Worse still, a female lifeform from the Ilanic shuttle causes Crichton (Ben Browder) to behave in a dangerous and irrational manner. Experiencing horrific flash images of the future, Crichton must endure this hellish mental glitch over and over and over again -- perhaps for all time. The fifth episode of Farscape to be filmed, "Back and Back and Back to the Future" was the third episode shown, making its broadcast debut on April 2, 1999. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: A Human Reaction John Crichton (Ben Browder) manages to pass through a wormhole in space, returning to what appears to be his native Australia. Curiously, he is given a chilly and hostile reception -- in fact, only John's father (Kent McCord) believes that Crichton really is Crichton. Also pulled through the wormhole are Aeryn (Claudia Black), D'Argo (Anthony Simcoe), and Rygel (Jonathan Hardy), who immediately upon their arrival are subjected to imprisonment and sadistic persecution. When Rygel is apparently killed and dissected, Crichton is forced to rethink his priorities -- and to confess his true feelings for Aeryn. "A Human Reaction" first aired on August 20, 1999. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: A Clockwork Nebari Moya and her crew knew that someday, somehow, the past of Nebari criminal Chiana (Gigi Edgley) would catch up to her. But when this inevitability finally occurs, the truth of the matter startles everyone. But that's nothing compared to actions of the Nebari who've arrived to "collect" Chiana -- and who also subject the crew to a radical mind-cleansing, robbing them of their free will. What do the Nebari really have in store for Chiana, Moya, and the universe? "A Clockwork Nebari" was first broadcast on September 11, 2000. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Family Ties Armed with new star charts from the botanist Br'nee (introduced in the previous episode "Bone to Be Wild"), Moya and her crew try to slip past the PeaceKeepers unnoticed, but to no avail. As Rygel (Jonathan Hardy) evinces a willingness to sell out his fellow crew members to regain his royal power, PK captain Crais (Lani Tupu) is ousted by his superiors and the hybrid Scorpius (Wayne Pygram) is installed in his place. Moya, her new infant starship, and the crew members (even the duplicitous Rygel) continue to formulate escape plans, but the situation remains unresolved by the end of the episode. First broadcast January 28, 2000, "Family Ties" served as the traditional cliffhanger ending for season one of Farscape. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Dream a Little Dream This episode of Farscape was originally presented out of chronological sequence, the explanation being that too much had occurred elsewhere in the saga to permit any earlier telecast. It is now 15 days after the destruction of the PeaceKeeper Gammak Base where Crichton (Ben Browder) had been held prisoner. Zhaan (Virginia Hey) fills Crichton in as to what has happened to Moya and her crew during his absence, including a legal imbroglio on the planet Litigara, where, arrested for a minor jaywalking charge, Zhaan ended up being charged for murder. It was up to Rygel (Jonathan Hardy) and Chiana (Gigi Edgley) to save their fellow crew member before Moya was forced to leave Litigara's orbital field. Alternately known as "Dream a Little Dream" and "Re:Union," this episode first aired on June 23, 2000. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: My Three Crichtons John Crichton (Ben Browder) is multiplied by three when an alien attempts to get hold of a sample human. In order to save Moya, the crew must sacrifice one of the Crichtons. But will the expendable one be a mere duplicate, or the genuine article -- and in the event of the second alternative, is the crew willing to give up its longtime comrade? "My Three Crichtons" made its first American TV appearance on July 14, 2000. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Mind the Baby Season two of Farscape was launched with a recap of the unresolved situation which climaxed season one. Only four passengers have managed to stay on board the besieged living starship Moya, with the rest all lost somewhere in an asteroid field. The crew members are forced into an uneasy alliance with recently deposed PeaceKeeper captain Crais (Lani Tupu), who is now himself a fugitive from the relentless PKs. Meanwhile, the newly named infant starship Talyn prepares to nominate his own captain -- making what may be the worst possible choice under the present circumstances. "Mind the Baby" first aired on March 17, 2000. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Look at the Princess, Part 1: A Kiss is But a Kiss In this first episode of the three-part story "Look at the Princess," the crew lands on the Royal Planet, one of the Breakaway Colonies that has declared independence from the PeaceKeepers. In order to save the rest of the crew from an unpleasant fate, Crichton (Ben Browder) must agree to wed the planet's Princess Katralla (Felicity Price). No matter what his decision, Crichton may never make it to the altar -- not if PK captain Scorpius (Wayne Pygram) has anything to say about the matter. "A Kiss Is But a Kiss" first aired on July 21, 2000. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Liars, Guns and Money, Part 1: A Not So Simple Plan In this first episode of the three-part story "Liars, Guns and Money," Crichton's former cellmate Stark (Paul Goddard) begs the crew to help him rob a Shadow Depository (aka a space bank) so that he can ransom D'Argo's son, Jothee (Matthew Newton), from slave traders. Unfortunately, the Depository's best customer turns out to be the crew's old PeaceKeeper nemesis Scorpius (Wayne Pygram), who has entered into a sinister conspiracy with Depository owner Natira (Claudia Karvan). Further problems arise when the Scorpius Neural Clone, previous implanted in the brain of Crichton (Ben Browder), is suddenly activated. "A Not-So Simple Plan" originally aired on January 5, 2001. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Home on the Remains In search of much-needed food and water, Chiana (Gigi Edgley) leads Moya's crew to the enormous carcass of an old Leviathan, and therein to a mining colony. Unfortunately, she has already made far too many enemies within the colony to ensure the safety of the crew members. Meanwhile, the starving Zhaan (Virginia Hey) begins metamorphosing into a plant life form which may prove fatally allergic to Moya. "Home on the Remains" originally aired on June 16, 2000. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Die Me, Dichotomy John Crichton (Ben Browder) has finally been rescued from Scorpius (Ben Browder), but not without great cost. Crichton is still suffering the after-effects of the Neural Clone implanted in his brain, while living starship Moya has been severely damaged by a drexan vapor. The starship's crew bring both Crichton and Moya to a medical facility, hoping to make repairs and continue their escape through space. Alas, Crichton, no longer in control of his own senses, has tipped Scorpius off as to the crew's location. As Crichton risks death to relieve the contradictory pressure on his brain, his fellow crew member (and lover) Aeryn (Claudia Black) apparently drowns before everyone's startled eyes. The obligatory cliffhanger climax for season two of Farscape, "Die Me, Dichotomy" was originally telecast on January 26, 2001. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Crackers Don't Matter In exchange for safe conduct to his own world, blind scientist T'raltixx (Danny Adcock) offers to provide the living starship Moya with a cloaking shield. Unfortunately, during the modifications necessary to set up the shield, something goes wrong, and as result the crew's emotionalism is heightened to a ridiculous degree. The situation worsens when the crew declares an all-out war over possession of Moya's cracker supply! "Crackers Don't Matter" first aired on April 7, 2000. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Bone to Be Wild Answering a distress call from a volatile asteroid field, Moya and her crew land on an unusually fertile world. Here they come across two residents with radically contradicting stories: M'Lee (Francesca Buller), who had sent the distress signal, claiming to have witnessed the massacre of her family, and botanist Br'nee (Marton Csokas), who insists that M'lee herself was responsible for the slaughter. Meanwhile, Aeryn bonds with Moya's "baby," an infant starship which may or may not align itself with the dreaded PeaceKeepers. "Bone to Be Wild" first aired on January 21, 2000. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Beware of Dog While stopping over at a commerce planet, Moya and her crew pick up a dangerous parasite. Chiana (Gigi Edgley) purchases a small and supposedly benign creature called a Vorc to track down and eliminate the unwelcome "visitor." But the Vorc turns out to be of a deadlier breed than expected -- and still worse, D'Argo (Anthony Simcoe) has been poisoned by the bite of a still-unidentified hideous beast. "Beware of Dog" was originally broadcast on August 11, 2000. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Liars, Guns and Money, Part 3: Plan B In this third episode of the three-part story "Liars, Guns and Money," Moya and her crew shift their rescue efforts from D'Argo's son Jothee (Matt Newton) to John Crichton (Ben Browder), who is in the clutches of Scorpius (Ben Browder), with his free will crippled by the implanted Neural Clone. Crichton ends up as the bone of contention between Scorpius and duplicitous Shadow Depository owner Natira (Claudia Karvan), who has some mysterious plans of her own. The Moya crew receives help from a surprising -- and initially very, very reluctant -- source. "Plan B" first aired on January 19, 2001. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Liars, Guns and Money, Part 2: With Friends Like These In this second episode of the three-part story "Liars, Guns and Money," Jothee (Matt Newton), son of D'Argo (Anthony Simcoe), is purchased by Scorpius (Wayne Pygram) at the slave auction. To rescue Jothee, Moya and her crew must retrace every incident that they've experienced in the Unchartered Territories. Exacerbating the situation, the boranium ingots stolen from the Shadow Depository turn out to be carrying deadly parasites, causing potential fatal problems in Moya's inner workings -- and the cure may be far worse than the ailment. "With Friends Like These" first aired on January 12, 2001. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Look at the Princess, Part 3: The Maltese Crichton In this final episode of the three-part story "Look at the Princess," Crichton (Ben Browder) has been transformed into a statue -- and his head has been removed. Elsewhere on the Royal Planet, Aeryn (Claudia Black) finds her priorities shifting in favor of a new man in her life. And the murder of Prince Clavor, the brother of Crichton's "fiancée" Katralla (Felicity Price), may spell doom for Moya and the crew unless a rapidly weakening Zhaan (Virginia Hey) can come to the rescue. "The Maltese Crichton" originally aired on August 4, 2000. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Look at the Princess, Part 2: I Do, I Think In this second episode of the three-part story "Look at the Princess," Crichton (Ben Browder) is still slated to wed Katralla (Felicity Price) of the Royal Planet. If he doesn't go through with the wedding, the consequences will be fatal for Moya and the crew -- and if he does, he faces the prospect of being transformed into a statue for the next 80 cycles. Meanwhile, Jena (Bianca Chiminello), fiancée of Katralla's brother Prince Klavor (Felix Williamson), reveals herself to be a PeaceKeeper assassin. "I Do, I Think" first aired on July 28, 2000. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Won't Get Fooled Again Crichton awakens to find himself in a hospital bed back on earth. Those attending him assure Crichton that everything he experienced on the Moya was nothing more than a dream. But having previously been hoodwinked into believing he had returned home, Crichton remains on his guard, especially when confronting a number of "strangers" who bear startling resemblances to his fellow crew members (for example, that nurse who calls herself Bettina Fairchild is the spitting image of Crichton's PK sweetheart Aeryn). "Won't Get Fooled Again" was originally telecast on August 18, 2000. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Vitas Mortis D'Argo (Anthony Simcoe) rushes to the side of legendary Luxan priestess Nilaam (Melissa Jaffer), who, on the verge of death, announces her intention to go through the Ritual of Passing. Instead, Nilaam performs the Ritual of Renewal, drawing from D'Argo's strength to rejuvenate herself as a young and powerful woman (now played by Anna Lise Phillips). As a result of this phenomenon, the living starship Moya suddenly grows old and infirm -- and Chiana (Gigi Edgley) is trapped in Moya's amnexus fluid, which is rapidly aging into solid, frozen form. "Vitas Mortis" originally aired on March 24, 2000. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: The Way We Weren't An old PeaceKeeper surveillance recording offers proof that an all-female Pleisar Regiment was responsible for the murder of Moya's original Pilot. Even worse, among the members of the regiment was current Moya crew member Aeryn (Claudia Black), who claims to have no memory of the killing. It is up to Crichton (Ben Browder) to probe Aeryn's subconscious and find out the truth before his outraged fellow crew members turn into a lynch mob. Alternately titled "The Way We Weren't" and "Forgive and Forget," this episode was first broadcast on April 14, 2000. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: The Ugly Truth Crais (Lani Tupu) solicits the aid of the Moya crew in modifying the defenses of Moya's infant starship, Talyn. Unfortunately, one of the "new and improved" weapons destroys a Plokavian vessel, whereupon everyone on Moya and Talyn is placed under arrest. Unless the crew members identify the person responsible for the tragic misfire, all will be executed -- a situation leading to a Rashomon climax, in which each interrogation reveals an entirely different version of the events leading to the disaster. "The Ugly Truth" originally aired on September 8, 2000. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: The Locket Stark (Paul Goddard), the man with whom Crichton (Ben Browder) had been imprisoned on the PK Gammak Base, arrives on Moya pursuing a mysterious new mission. Later, Aeryn (Claudia Black) is stranded in space during a reconnaisance mission -- and when Crichton goes to her rescue, he is likewise marooned. Worse still, Crichton is tormented by disturbingly lifelike images of his mortal enemy Scorpius. The one remaining question: Is all of this really happening, or is someone's imagination running amok? "The Locket" first aired on August 25, 2000. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: The Hidden Memory In this conclusion of the two-part story inaugurated in the previous episode "Nerve," John Crichton is still trapped on the PK Gammak base, where he is bickered over by hybrid scientist Scorpius (Wayne Pygram), who wants possession of John's mind, and PK officer Crais (Lani Tupu), who is determined to destroy John's body. Though not yet recovered from her stab wound, Aeryn (Claudia Black) joins D'Argo (Anthony Simcoe) and Zhaan (Virginia Hey) in a desperate attempt to rescue Crichton. Meanwhile, with Chiana (Gigi Edgley) in attendance, the living starship Moya finally gives birth -- resulting in some truly unforeseen complications. "The Hidden Memory" was originally broadcast on January 14, 2000. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Taking the Stone Seeking solace after learning of the death of her brother, Chiana (Gigi Edgley) borrows Aeryn's power system and speeds off to the Royal Cemetary Planet. Here Chiana forms a bond with the Clansmen, a underground community of teens and young adults who sustain themselves with drugs and hedonism. Aeryn (Claudia Black) and Crichton (Ben Browder) are willing to respect Chiana's efforts to assuage her grief, but Rygel (Jonathan Hardy) tries to profit from the girl's plight by plundering the Cemetary Planet's tombs -- with horrifying results. "Taking the Stone" was first broadcast on March 31, 2000. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Picture If You Will While shopping on a commerce ship owned by an alien named Kyvan (Chris Haywood), Chiana (Gigi Edgley) comes across a portrait which possesses the ability to foretell the future. What she sees she doesn't like; it appears that the vampiric sorcerer Maldis (also known as Kyvan, and also played by Chris Haywood) has sinister plans for Moya's crew -- perhaps eternal enslavement, perhaps death. It falls to Zhaan (Virginia Hey) to overcome a roadblock in her own mental makeup in order to defeat the malevolent Maldis. "Picture If You Will" was originally telecast on April 21, 2000. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Out of Their Minds After being attacked by a Halosian ship, everyone in Moya's crew is "knocked" into the next available body. The intellect and personality of Pilot (Lani Tupu) ends up in the body of Chiana (Gigi Edgley), D'Argo (Anthony Simcoe) is shifted to Pilot's body, Crichton (Ben Browder) finds himself in Aeryn's body, Aeryn (Claudia Black) in Rygel's, and Rygel (Jonathan Hardy) in Crichton's. This personality transference becomes even more confusing when the crew members try to defend Moya while being trapped in their new unfamiliar selves. Meanwhile, Zhaan (Virginia Hey), held prisoner by the Halosians, desperately tries to hold her captors at bay. "Out of Their Minds" originally aired on July 7, 2000. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Nerve In this first episode of a pivotal two-part Farscape story, Aeryn has suffered stab wounds, requiring an emergency tissue graft. To expedite this operation, Crichton (Ben Browder) disguises himself as a PeaceKeeper captain, and in the company of Chiana (Gigi Edgley) he infiltrates the PK's Gammak Base. Upon his arrival, Crichton again crosses the path of sympathetic PK tech girl Gilliana (Alyssa-Jane Cook) -- and also makes first contact with the evil hybrid scientist, Scorpius (Wayne Pygram). The climax finds Crichton subjected to the Aurora Chair, which opens the floodgates of his memory -- a potentially disastrous turn of events for Moya and her crew. Originally telecast January 7, 2000, "Nerve" was followed one week later by the concluding chapter "The Hidden Memory." ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Eat Me Accidently damaging the transport pod, Jool (Tammy MacIntosh) is forced along with D'Argo (Anthony Simcoe) and Chiana (Gigi Edgely) to land on a seriously ill leviathan (a living starship like Moya). Though the vessel may be in its death throes, it isn't as abandoned as it seems, much to the horror of the three crew members -- especially D'Argo. Meanwhile, a starburst from Moya thrusts Aeryn (Claudia Black) onto the deck of Moya's "baby" starship Talyn, which is also ailing and in agony. "Eat Me" first aired on April 20, 2001. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Green-Eyed Monster The living starship Talyn is swallowed and trapped in the gullet of an enormous budong -- an ordeal that no previous starship (or space traveller, for that matter) has ever survived. The crew tries to save Talyn, but is hampered by jealousy and suspicion within the ranks. Then Stark (Paul Goddard) hatches another wild scheme to rescue both Talyn and the crew -- a scheme which may literally blow up in everyone's faces. "Green-Eyed Monster" originally aired on June 22, 2001. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Relativity The Retrieval Squad poses a new threat to the recuperating starship Talyn. Aeryn (Claudia Black) has a traumatic reunion with her supremely judgmental mother, Xhalax Sun (Linda Cropper). And Crichton (Ben Browder) and Crais (Lani Tupu) must rely on their wits -- and more problematically, on each other -- to survive a trek through a jungle planet. "Relativity" made its first American TV appearance on June 6, 2001. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Scratch 'n' Sniff The overworked Chiana (Gigi Edgley) and Jool (Tammy MacIntosh) need a break from their duties, while Pilot needs relief from the ceaseless arguments between Crichton (Ben Browder) and D'Argo (Anthony Simcoe). There is nothing else to do but to seek out a brief respite on the pleasure planet LoMo. Predictably, however, the crew experiences precious little pleasure, thanks to a dangerously addictive (or, rather, seductive) drug called Freslin. "Scratch 'n' Sniff" originally aired on July 20, 2001. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Self-Inflicted Wounds, Part 1 - Could'a, Would'a, Should'a In this first episode of the two-part story "Self-Inflicted Wounds," Moya, following directions provided by Crichton (Ben Browder) heads to a planet where the ailing Zhaan (Virginia Hey) might be healed. En route, Moya collides with another living starship, the Pathfinder, whereupon both vessels are fused together. The two ships attempt to extricate themselves from one another -- with possibly fatal consequences for Moya and Pilot -- while Rygel (Jonathan Hardy) inadvertently revives the last surviving member of the Interon race from frozen statis. That survivor is the brilliant, fiery-tempered, shrill-voiced Jool (Tammy McIntosh), making her first Farscape appearance. "Could'a, Would'a, Should'a" originally aired on March 30, 2001. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Infinite Possibilities, Part 2: Icarus Abides In this second episode of the two-part story "Infinite Possibilities," Cmdr. Crichton (Ben Browder) faces danger from three fronts: the mercurial Scorpius clone "Harvey" imbedded in his brain, the fearsome Charrid sentinels on planet Dam-Ba-Da, and the impending attack of a Scarran dreadnought. Crisis piles upon crisis as the crew members on Dam-Ba-Da face betrayal at the hands of someone within their ranks, while those crewpersons still on the living starship Talyn are unable to utilize the hardware necessary to prevent unwelcome visitors from "dropping in." "Icarus Abides" first aired on August 3, 2001. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Self-Inflicted Wounds, Part 2 - Wait for the Wheel In this second episode of the two-part story "Self-Inflicted Wounds," Crichton (Ben Browder) finds that he has been played for a fool by duplicitous aliens -- and the results may prove fatal to Moya and her crew. Previously hostile toward Crichton, the recently revived Interon Jool (Tammy MacIntosh) joins her former enemy in his efforts to save Moya. Meanwhile, the ailing Zhaan finally pays the ultimate price for her many acts of self-sacrifice. Virginia Hey (Zhaan) makes her final Farscape appearance in "Wait for the Wheel," which originally aired on April 6, 2001. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: ...Different Destinations Moya and her crew make a rest stop at a remote planet in hopes of getting over the death of Zhaan. Upon arrival, Stark (Paul Goddard) passes through a hole in time, thrusting himself and the crew back to a famous Alamo-like battle between the PeaceKeepers and the Venek at an old monastery fortress. Here, the participants learn a surprising fact about the supposedly evil PeaceKeepers -- but in so doing, they may end up altering history, with devastating effects on billions of future lives. "...Different Destinations" was first broadcast on April 13, 2001. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: The Choice It looks as though Crichton (Ben Browder) is dead -- or, at least, the more preferable of Crichton's two separate identities has died. A grieving Aeryn (Claudia Black) heads to Valldon, a planet of mystics, hoping to find a means of communicating with Crichton's spirit. Meanwhile, Crais' (Lani Tupu) past misdeeds as a PeaceKeeper may have profound effects on Talyn's crew -- with the conspicuous exception of the Scarrans. "The Choice" was first broadcast on August 17, 2001. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Thanks for Sharing With their "bad" reputation growing apace, Moya's crew has trouble securing vital supplies on the planet Kanvia -- none more vital than Chromextin, a stimulant necessary to cure Moya's offspring starship Talyn. Making matters worse, the crew gets into a brawl with Kanvia security director Tolven (Sandy Winton), who promptly refuses to do business with them ever again. A ray of hope is provided by the machinations of Crichton (Ben Browder) -- or rather, the two diametrically opposite personalities of Crichton's twin alter egos -- but Aeryn (Claudia Black) messes things up when another unsavory aspect of her past returns to haunt her. "Thanks for Sharing" first aired on June 15, 2001. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Suns and Lovers Moya's crew revels in the fact that they have become famous in the Uncharted Territories, but a sudden space storm ends their fun. D'Argo (Anthony Simcoe), feeling betrayed by the romance between his son, Jothee (Matt Newton) and Chiana (Gigi Edgley), teeters on the brink of insanity. If this isn't bad enough, Moya is plagued by a series of gamma disturbances, the source of which can be explained only by the elusive religious fanatic Borlik (Leanna Walsman). "Suns and Lovers" first aired on March 23, 2001. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Season of Death Season three of Farscape opens on a melancholy note, with earthling Crichton (Ben Browder) robbed of the ability to speak, victimized by Scorpius' implanted Neural Clone, and traumatized by the death of his lover Aeryn (Claudia Black). Moya and her crew try to ease Crichton's pain, but it appears that a merciful death is the only solution; certainly, medical diagnostician Grunchik (Hugh Keays-Byrne), plagued by his own past misdeeds, is of no help whatsoever. Meanwhile, crew member Zhaan (Virginia Hey) puts her life on the line to revive the drowned Aeryn. With this episode, former recurring characters Stark (Paul Goddard), Scorpius (Wayne Pygram), and Crais (Lani Tupu) graduated to series-regular status. "Season of Death" initially aired on March 16, 2001. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Revenging Angel Never on the best of terms, Crichton (Ben Browder) and D'Argo (Anthony Simcoe) have another falling out -- this one with potentially fatal consequences. Left alone to command Moya and crew, D'Argo must prevent a nearby Luxan ship from blowing itself up. And while in a comatose state, Crichton enters a colorful animated world that bears startling resemblances not only to his "real" surroundings, but also a vintage Chuck Jones cartoon. "Revenging Angel" originally aired on August 10, 2001. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Incubator Seemingly returning from the dead, Scorpius (Wayne Pygram) takes Crichton's implanted neurochip on a "sentimental journey" to unlock an encrypted section of the chip. In another development, the Relgarian Linfer (Jo Kerrigan) offers to pass along some valuable wormhole travel secrets to the crew. But Linfer's price is steep indeed; she wants immediate possession of the living starship Moya. "Incubator" first aired on July 13, 2001. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Losing Time Worn out from past experiences in general and Crichton's ceaseless wormhole hunts in particular, Moya's crew is at the breaking point. Thus, they're in no shape to do battle with Tallip, an energy parasite which causes an uncontrollable and oftimes fatal shaking reflex. Meanwhile, Jool (Tammy MacIntosh) and Chiana (Gigi Edgley) have a potentially deadly "difference of opinon," while Scorpius (Wayne Pygram) experiences his own personal internal hell. "Losing Time" was initially broadcast on June 29, 2001. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Meltdown When the ailing Aeryn (Claudia Black) rejects a restorative neural implant, Talyn must seek out another host body. But before this happens, Talyn is lured into the gravitational pull of a blazing star, causing a mysterious mist to seep from the starship's inner workings, complicating the crew's efforts to save both Talyn and Aeryn. And who is this not-so-friendly stranger with the really bad sunburn who calls himself Mu-Quillus (Mark Mitchell)? "Meltdown" first aired on July 14, 2001. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Infinite Possibilities, Part 1:Daedalus Demands In this first episode of the two-part story "Infinite Possibilities," the crew members of Talyn have no sooner unwound from past crises than they receive a disturbing communication from the Ancients. It seems that the Farscape 1 module has been spotted journeying through a wormhole at a time when, accordingly to the preordained continuum, the module should be doing nothing of the kind. It turns out that this "Farscape 1" is one of what may be several duplicates created on the heavily guarded planet Dam-Ba-Da. As if this doesn't pile enough problems on the shoulders of John Crichton (Ben Browder), the "friendly" Scorpius clone (named Harvey) implanted with Crichton's brain begins acting up -- and a fleet of enemy Scarran are poised to attack. "Daedalus Demands" originally aired on July 27, 2001. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Fractures Crichton (Ben Browder) is not quite as dead as was previously assumed, but he may wish that he was after the crews of Moya and Talyn stage a tumultuous reunion. Meanwhile, a new group of escapees from the PeaceKeepers is shuttled on board. Unfortunately, one of the refugees may be a PeaceKeeper "mole" -- but is it the Scarran Naj Gil (Thomas Holesgrove), the Nebari Hubero (Kate Beahan), the female Hynerian Orrhn Pak, or the exiled PK technician Markir Tal (Matt Doran)? "Fractures" first aired on August 24, 2001. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Crichton Kicks As Farscape kicks off its fourth season, John Crichton (Ben Browder) has at last solved the equations of wormhole travel. But even this knowledge may not enable him to safely navigate the Uncharted Territories while at the controls of the ancient leviathan Elack. As Crichton searches for Moya and her crew, he must fact the possibility that even if he locates them, he may never be able to link up with them again. Raelee Hill makes her first appearance as Sikozu, who has been hired by a race of neural-cluster harvesters to track down old leviathans like Elack -- but who is unaware of her employers' evil motivations. "Crichton Kicks" originally aired on June 7, 2002. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Terra Firma After journeying back to 1986 and saving his father, Jack (Kent McCord), from certain death, John lands on Earth, where he is reunited with his terrestrial sweetheart, Caroline (Erica Heynatz). The alien Moya crew members are also kept busy, meeting with the understandably nervous Dignitaries of Earth. Naturally, things do not continue to flow along smoothly, placing John in the unenviable position of rescuing his home planet (which he no longer regards as his true home) from destruction. Several plot strands are tragically knotted together around D.K. (Murray Bartlett), the crew's new-found friend. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Kansas After a hiatus of over five months, Farscape resumed its fourth and final season with a foray into the distant past. Rescued by D'Argo (Anthony Simcoe) and the Moya crew from his wormhole odyssey, John Crichton (Ben Browder) discovers that he has inadvertently upset the Timestream. As a result, Crichton and his cohorts end up on Earth in 1986, just before John's father, Jack (Kent McCord), is about to serve as commander on the ill-fated Challenger shuttle flight. With virtually no time to spare, John tries to save his father's life, an action that will prevent the entire Farscape project from slipping into limbo. Elsewhere, the Moya crew encounter that curious native custom known as Halloween, and also attempt to steer clear of a nosy interloper. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Twice Shy While negotiating with traders for maps of Tormented Space, the Moya crew suddenly undergoes profound personality changes. Some of these alterations are for the good, notably the uncharacteristic generosity of the mercenary Rygel (Jonathan Hardy) -- but some may bode ill for the crew, especially an uneasy friendship between the mercurial Scorpius (Wayne Pygram) and soldier-of-fortune Sikozu (Raelee Hill). Can these metamorphoses be due to the influence of Talikaa (Paula Arundell), the slave girl whom Chiana (Gigi Edgley) has rescued from the map traders? ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Unrealized Reality While spacewalking, Crichton (Ben Browder) is sucked into a small wormhole, ending up on what seems to be a floating iceberg occupied by an oddly garbed old man (John Bach). It turns out that the stranger, whom Crichton joshingly nicknames "Einstein," is from a race known as the Ancients, who centuries before had discovered that the universe was connected by a sort of "wormhole highway" and had dedicated themselves to keep the millions of realms thus connected safe from harm. Crichton is told that his own accumulated wormhole knowledge has the potential to disrupt or destroy all the alternate realities in space -- and thus, Einstein has no choice but to execute him. Several former Farscape regulars make cameo appearances via highlights from earlier episodes. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Coup By Clam Moya is guided to the planet Khurtanan for some desperately needed repairs, but none of the planet's mechanics will cooperate unless corrupt local doctor Tumii (Bruce Spence) gives Moya's crew a clean bill of health. Instead, Tumii poisons the crew with the deadly Qatal Mollusk, holding out the antidote unless he is given an enormous bribe. The "good" doctor also strongarms Crichton and Rygel (Jonathan Hardy) into stealing a huge cache of Qatals which are being stored as weapons by a group of resistance fighters. Somehow all this intrigue leads to an incredible sequence wherein the two most aggressively male members of Moya's crew dress up in female drag. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: A Prefect Murder Moya and her crew take refuge from their enemies in "Tormented Space," so named because of the physical and emotional battering endured by anyone traveling through it. Landing on a semi-civilized planet to gather supplies, the crew members find themselves in the middle of a power transition between current prefect Falaak (Bruce Spence) and his hand-picked successor Gaashah (Ivar Kants). What should have been a peaceful stopover turns into a nightmare when Aeryn Sun (Claudia Black), her mind clouded by bizarre and disturbing hallucinations, apparently murders Gaasha. Before long, the rest of the crew are at each other's throats -- the result of the sting from an insect which robs its victims of their free will. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: I Shrink, Therefore I Am Moya is captured by Coreeshi bounty hunters, who hope to collect the reward posted for John Crichton (Ben Browder) by the PeaceKeepers. Tipped off by Pilot to the danger awaiting him, Crichton sneaks back on board and remains in hiding until he can hatch a scheme to rescue his fellow crew members. Meanwhile, Coreeshi leader Axikor (Duncan Young) keeps the balance of power on his side with a unique "containment procedure" -- namely, shrinking Crichton's comrades and sealing them in metal cylinders. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: What Was Lost, Part 2: Resurrection In this second episode of the two-part story "What Was Lost," Crichton (Ben Browder) continues to elude the deceptively seductive PK Commandant Grayza (Rebecca Rigg). Meanwhile, D'Argo (Anthony Simcoe) and Jool (Tammy MacIntosh) formulate a plan to save the Moya crew. And Scorpius (Wayne Pygram) is betrayed by his fellow PKs once again -- and this may be the proverbial straw that breaks the back. "Resurrection" first aired on June 21, 2002. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Into the Lion's Den, Part 2: Wolf in Sheep's Clothing In this second episode of the two-part story "Into the Lion's Den," Scorpius (Wayne Pygram) threatens to blow up the earth unless Crichton (Ben Browder) agrees to help him harvest some new wormhole research. When all other efforts to stymie the PeaceKeepers fail, Crichton rallies the crew in a desperate attempt to destroy the Command Carrier. But where do the fluctuating loyalties of Crais (Lani Tupu) lie in this present crisis? "Wolf in Sheep's Clothing" first aired on April 19, 2002. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: What Was Lost, Part 1: Sacrifice After finally making contact with the surviving Moya crew members, Jool (Tammy MacIntosh) and D'Argo (Anthony Simcoe) learn some amazing facts about Jool's Interon forbears at an old archeological site on the planet Arnessk. The ancient, three-eyed woman (Melissa Jaffer) introduced in the third-season finale "Dog With Two Bones" poses a new threaten to Crichton (Ben Browder). And the seductive but deadly PK Commandant Grayza (Rebecca Rigg) launches another all-out effort to capture Moya and her crew. The first episode of the two-part story "What Was Lost," "Sacrifice" made its TV debut on June 14, 2002. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Promises In order to save her crew, Moya must provide shelter to Ullom (Richard Carter), another fugitive from the PKs. At the same time, Aeryn (Claudia Black) suffers from Sebecean heat delirium, caused by a nearby alien vessel. Ullom may be able to cure Aeryn, but he is not in a particularly generous mood. The outlook is brighter for Crichton (Ben Browder), whose problems with the implanted Neural Clone have come to an abrupt end -- but what does this matter if Crichton loses his beloved Aeryn? "Promises" was originally telecast on July 12, 2002. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Natural Election Entering a wormhole in space, Moya and her crew are trapped in a dank and dismal black hole. Worse still, Moya burns from within thanks to a parasite that threatens to devour the ship, but not before starting small and painful fires along the way. To top it off, the untrustworthy Rygel (Jonathan Hardy) is briefly appointed the captain of Moya -- and Aeryn (Claudia Black) announces that she's pregnant. "Natural Election" was initially telecast on July 19, 2002. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Lava's a Many Splendored Thing Searching for ill-gotten gain around a volcanic cave, light-fingered Rygel (Jonathan Hardy) once agains ends up in the clutches of hostile aliens. This time his captors are the Tarkans, who behave more like the Three Stooges than the usual Farscape bad guys. As Sikozu (Raelee Hill) and Chiana (Gigi Edgley) race to Rygel's rescue at the controls of D'Argo's starship Lo'la, Crichton (Ben Browder) does his best to pull the wool over the eyes of Tarkan bandit chief Raa'Keel (John Adam). "Lava's a Many-Splendored Thing" originally aired on June 28, 2002. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: John Quixote During yet another of her shopping sprees on a commerce planet, Chiana (Gigi Edgley) purchases a handful of "game blobs" -- virtual-reality games which activate upon contacting the owner's flesh. Before long, Crichton (Ben Browder, who also wrote this episode) finds himself trapped in a hellish V.R. world, replete with fearsome ogres, armored knights, and damsels in distress. Even more disturbing is the fact that the events in the game -- and the characters involved -- seem to be inspired by the past experiences of Cricthon and his crew. The explanation for this jarring journey down memory lane has something to do with a shady financial deal struck by former crew member Stark, played by Paul Goddard, making a return appearance to the series along with Virginia Hey as the late, lamented Zhaan. "John Quixote" first aired on July 26, 2002. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Into the Lion's Den, Part 1: Lambs to the Slaughter When Crichton (Ben Browder) finally agrees to share his wormhole knowledge with Scorpius (Wayne Pigrim), the crew is allowed to board the Command Carrier. Aeryn (Claudia Black) and Crais (Lani Tupu) are given a less than cordial welcome by the Carrier's chief officer, Henta (Marta Dusseldorp), and not without good reason. Meanwhile, a mysterious visitor from High Command hopes to exploit a volatile and divisive situation amongst the PeaceKeeper. Rebecca Rigg joins the series in the role of seductive, and highly untrustworthy, PK Commandant Mele-On Grayza. The first episode of the two-part story "Into the Lion's Den," "Lambs to the Slaughter" originally aired on April 12, 2002. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: I-Yensch, You-Yensch After a lengthy hiatus, season three of Farscape resumed on April 5, 2002, with the episode called "I-Yensch, You-Yensch." The title refers to a pair of bracelets, which, when synchronized, result in bizarre nerve effects. This is but one of the episode's many plot strands; others include Moya's reluctance to help Crichton (Ben Browder) put a stop to the PeaceKeeper's wormhole research and a frenzied round of negotiations with Scorpius (Wayne Pygram) to provide safe harbor for the crew on the Command Center. With all this going on, Moya's offspring starship Talyn has trouble coping with the suspense -- and may end up destroying everyone and everything, himself included. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Dog with Two Bones Now that they've emerged victorious from their most recent scrape with the PKs, the combined crew members of Moya and Talyn bid each other goodbye. Crichton finds himself torn between his love for Aeryn (Claudia Black) and his desire to return to earth. A strange old woman (Melissa Jafar, making what is undoubtedly the first of many recurring appearances) complicates matters by inducing some fantastic hallucinations. And while the deceased starship Talyn is given last rites, the sudden appearance of a new wormhole threatens to strand everyone in deep space, without food, water, or oxygen. Paul Goddard and Lani Tupu make their final series appearances as Stark and Crais, respectively. The requisite cliffhanger ending of Farscape's third season, "Dog With Two Bones" originally aired on April 26. 2002. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Bringing Home the Beacon The women of Moya head to a black-market trading post on a derelict Leviathan. Their purpose is to buy an appropriate disguise for Moya in anticipation of enemy attack. Instead, the ladies stumble onto a secret meeting between the Peacekeepers and the Scarrans. Treachery abounds at this conclave, resulting in a violent schism in the relationship between Aeryn (Claudia Black) and Crichton (Ben Browder). ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: A Constellation of Doubt Captured by Scarrans, Aeryn (Claudia Black) is spirited away to the elusive enemy base Katratzi. Hoping to locate his lost love, John Crichton (Ben Browder) uses Pilot to monitor transmissions throughout the universe. Imagine Crichton's surprise when he tunes into a TV tabloid program -- which is currently conducting a vicious and demoralizing smear campaign against John and the Moya crew. The episode's pivotal scene is a showdown between Crichton and Scorpius (Wayne Pygram), with the continued secrecy of John's precious wormhole knowledge hanging in the balance. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Bad Timing In the now-famous final episode of Farscape, a chance remark by John Crichton (Ben Browder) precipitates a full-scale Scarran invasion of Earth. The only hope for salvation is the utter destruction of the wormhole, a drastic action which John is not all that keen on undertaking. Meanwhile, the duplicitous Scorpius (Wayne Pygram) exploits John's uncertainties in order to forge yet one more unholy alliance. Will the Earth be rendered vulnerable and helpless? And what of the relationship between John and Aeryn (Claudia Black)? Yes, the well-publicized denouement is a shocker -- but remember, nothing is "final" in the wondrous world of TV series spin-offs. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: We're So Screwed, Part 1: Fetal Attraction In the first episode of a three-part story, the Moya crew continues searching for Katratzi, the elusive Scarran base where Aeryn (Claudia Black) is being held captive. In the process, Noranti (Melissa Jaffer) inadvertently unleashes a deadly plague known as Hynerian Dermaphollica at a Scarran border station. As it turns out, the disease may actually benefit the crew's efforts to save Aeryn and her unborn baby -- but at least one Moya passenger may suffer mightily in the process. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: We're So Screwed, Part 3: La Bomba In the conclusion of a three-part story, the Moya crew must improvise a new strategy a minute to escape from the Scarran base Katratzi. To keep the unreliable Scorpius (Wayne Pygram) from revealing the secrets of wormhole technology, John Crichton (Ben Browder) may have to cater to Scorpius' every whim -- and right now, that whim involves harvesting Scarran flora. As the episode progresses, the viewer is faced with two disturbing questions: Are the Moya crew members liberators or terrorists -- and will Crichton be forced to detonate his nuclear device? ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: We're So Screwed, Part 2: Hot to Katratzi In the second episode of a three-part story, John Crichton (Ben Browder) has managed to rescue Aeryn (Claudia Black) and is heading for Katratzi, the secret and hitherto elusive Scarran base. A message from "beyond" informs John that the duplicitous Scorpius (Wayne Pygram) is in full possession of the precious wormhole secrets. Now John must rescue Scorpius from his Scarran torturers -- or die in the process, the inevitable result of the nuclear bomb rigged to explode if John should meet with harm. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Prayer Determined to locate Crichton (Ben Browder) and to figure out the precious wormhole knowledge, Scarran captain Jenek (Jason Clarke) aggressively interrogates his prisoner Aeryn (Claudia Black). Upon discovering that Aeryn is pregnant, the Scarrans exhibit a fascination bordering on exultation. Meanwhile, Crichton and Scorpius (Wayne Pygram), having forged an uneasy alliance, conduct a frenzied search for Aeryn -- cutting a swatch of death and devastation along the way. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Farscape: Mental as Anything D.K. is dead, and Scorpius (Wayne Pygram) wants to track down the alien who did it. For this he must learn to exercise self-control, so Scorpius seeks out his spiritual mentor, Katoya (John Brumpton), at a Mental Arts training camp -- and he coerces Moya's other male crew members to participate in the training. The lessons are potentially beneficial to Crichton (Ben Browder), who is preparing himself for his next run-in with the Scarrans. But D'Argo (Anthony Simcoe) threatens to go off the deep end when he meets another Mental Camp trainee: Macton (Blair Venn), the Peacekeeper who murdered D'Argo's wife, Lo'Lann (Rachel Gordon). ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide
  • How to Be - DVD

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Nov 17, 2009

    Officially an adult but locked into a perpetual phase of arrested development, an aimless twentysomething attempts to make sense of his go-nowhere life after being dumped by his girlfriend and forced to move back home with his parents. Art may still be far from mid-life, but no one can deny that he's having a crisis. When his attempts at establishing himself as a sensitive singer/songwriter fail, Art dips into his inheritance money in order to experiment with a variety of new-age therapies and hire an eccentric self-help guru. Gradually, Art begins to make sense of the dysfunctional relationship he shares with his frustrated parents, and understand the unique role he plays in his small but close-knit social circle. ~ Jason Buchanan, All Movie Guide
  • Get Smart: Season 5

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Dec 8, 2009

    Includes:Get Smart: Age Before Duty (1969) Get Smart: Widow Often Annie (1969) Get Smart: Smart Fell on Alabama (1969) Get Smart: And Baby Makes Four, Part 2 (1969) Get Smart: The Apes of Rath (1969) Get Smart: Physician: Impossible (1969) Get Smart: And Baby Makes Four, Part 1 (1969) Get Smart: The Treasure of C. Errol Madre (1969) Get Smart: Valerie of the Dolls (1969) Get Smart: Ice Station Siegfried (1969) Get Smart: Pheasant Under Glass (1969) Get Smart: Ironhand (1969) Get Smart: Is This Trip Necessary? (1969) Get Smart: House of Max, Part 2 (1970) Get Smart: Do I Hear a Vaults? (1970) Get Smart: Hello, Columbus - Goodbye, America (1970) Get Smart: What's It All About, Algie? (1970) Get Smart: Smartacus (1970) Get Smart: And Only Two Ninety-Nine (1970) Get Smart: How Green Was My Valet (1970) Get Smart: Witness for the Execution (1970) Get Smart: The Mess of Adrian Listenger (1970) Get Smart: House of Max, Part 1 (1970) Get Smart: I Am Curiously Yellow (1970) Get Smart: Rebecca of Funny-Folk Farm (1970) Get Smart: Moonlighting Becomes You (1970) Get Smart: Age Before Duty No synopsis available. Get Smart: Widow Often Annie No synopsis available. Get Smart: Smart Fell on Alabama No synopsis available. Get Smart: And Baby Makes Four, Part 2 No synopsis available. Get Smart: The Apes of Rath No synopsis available. Get Smart: Physician: Impossible No synopsis available. Get Smart: And Baby Makes Four, Part 1 No synopsis available. Get Smart: The Treasure of C. Errol Madre No synopsis available. Get Smart: Valerie of the Dolls No synopsis available. Get Smart: Ice Station Siegfried No synopsis available. Get Smart: Pheasant Under Glass No synopsis available. Get Smart: Ironhand No synopsis available. Get Smart: Is This Trip Necessary? No synopsis available. Get Smart: House of Max, Part 2 No synopsis available. Get Smart: Do I Hear a Vaults? No synopsis available. Get Smart: Hello, Columbus - Goodbye, America No synopsis available. Get Smart: What's It All About, Algie? No synopsis available. Get Smart: Smartacus No synopsis available. Get Smart: And Only Two Ninety-Nine No synopsis available. Get Smart: How Green Was My Valet No synopsis available. Get Smart: Witness for the Execution No synopsis available. Get Smart: The Mess of Adrian Listenger No synopsis available. Get Smart: House of Max, Part 1 No synopsis available. Get Smart: I Am Curiously Yellow No synopsis available. Get Smart: Rebecca of Funny-Folk Farm No synopsis available. Get Smart: Moonlighting Becomes You No synopsis available.
  • Lower Learning - Blu-ray Disc

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Dec 8, 2009

    Eva Longoria Parker, Rob Corddry, and Jason Biggs star in first-time writer/director Mark Lafferty's satirical look at the American school system as seen from the perspective of a burnt-out elementary school vice principal on the verge of a nervous breakdown. When it comes to receiving a proper education, Geraldine Ferraro Elementary is the last place a parent would want to send their child; the teachers generally hover somewhere between drunk and psychotic (though frequently a bit of both), the children have all been left behind. Meanwhile, harried Vice Principal Tom Willoman (Biggs) has little choice but to stand aside and watch as both his life and career slowly circle the drain. Enter Rebecca Seabrook (Longoria Parker) -- the smoking-hot district inspector assigned the thankless task of shutting down Geraldine Ferraro Elementary once and for all. Taking note of the reckless corruption displayed by morally handicapped Principal Billings (Corddry), Rebecca schemes with Vice Principal Willoman to take back the classrooms and give the kids a fair shot at getting a proper education. But ever since he suffered an undisclosed tragedy, Vice Principal Willoman has been rendered a total milquetoast. Can Willoman summon the fortitude needed to help Rebecca whip Geraldine Ferraro Elementary back into shape, or has the damage inflicted during the embarrassing Billings administration already locked the school into an irreversible nosedive of epic buffoonery? Kyle Gass, Monica Potter, and Ed Helms co-star. ~ Jason Buchanan, All Movie Guide
  • World's Greatest Dad - Blu-ray Disc

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Dec 8, 2009

    A high school poetry teacher and single father discovers that the thing he covets most in life may not be what makes him truly happy in this pitch-black comedy directed by Bobcat Goldthwait, and starring Robin Williams. Lance Clayton (Williams) is a mild-mannered high school teacher from Seattle who was granted sole custody of his son, Kyle (Daryl Sabara), following a nasty divorce. As hard as Lance tries to connect with his hostile, loathsome son, all he receives for his sincere efforts are insults and scorn. The only things Kyle seems to care about are violent video games and internet porn, the latter obsession eventually serving to alienate the foul-mouthed teen from his sole friend, Andrew (Evan Martin). His books rejected by publishers and his poetry class on the verge of being canceled due to student disinterest, Lance does find a bit of happiness in his relationship with pretty art instructor Claire (Alexie Gilmore), though these days her gaze is drifting toward handsome young English teacher Mike (Henry Simmons), who recently celebrated the publication of his very first piece in The New Yorker. Then, one day, Lance discovers his son dead, the apparent victim of autoerotic asphyxiation gone horribly awry. In order to give the boy some dignity in death, Lance pens a suicide note before summoning the authorities. By chance, that note is published in Kyle's school newspaper, instantly transforming him into a misunderstood cult icon among the impressionable student body. Now, tragedy has become opportunity for Lance. Can the grieving father live with the knowledge of how he achieved such fame, or has he sacrificed his own soul in his blind quest to garner the kind of fame that has eluded him his entire life? ~ Jason Buchanan, All Movie Guide