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  • All in the Family - The Complete First Season

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Sep 1, 2009

    Includes - All in the Family: Meet the Bunkers (1971) All in the Family: Writing the President (1971) All in the Family: Archie Gives Blood (1971) All in the Family: Gloria Is Pregnant (1971) All in the Family: Lionel Moves Into the Neighborhood (1971) All in the Family: The First and Last Supper (1971) All in the Family: Success Story (1971) All in the Family: Gloria Discovers Women's Lib (1971) All in the Family: Archie Is Worried About His Job (1971) All in the Family: Edith Has Jury Duty (1971) All in the Family: Now That You Know the Way (1971) All in the Family: Judging Books By Covers (1971) All in the Family: Archie's Aching Back (1971) All in the Family: Meet the Bunkers The sitcom that changed the face of American television premiered on January 12, 1971, with the last of three pilot episodes filmed between 1968 and 1970 (during which time the property underwent two near-complete cast overhauls and three title changes). Written by series co-producer Norman Lear, "Meet the Bunkers" used the occasion of Archie and Edith Bunker's wedding anniversary to introduce the main characters and rapidly establish both the mood and tenor of all the episodes to come. Though virtually plotless, the episode is jam-packed with incident: Archie and Mike have a heated argument over "racial profiling," Edith tries to drag a recalcitrant Archie to church, Gloria and Mike are so hot for one another that they can barely wait until they get to the bedroom, and Lionel Jefferson (Mike Evans) uses broad African-American stereotypes to subtly needle the reactionary Archie. Especially worth noting in this inaugural episode is Jean Stapleton's portrayal of Edith, who comes off as a lot less stupid and a lot more sarcastic than she would in future episodes. While "Meet the Bunkers" seems somewhat tame when seen today, it packed enough of a wallop back in 1971 for CBS to issue a disclaimer at the beginning of the program, in which the network lauded All in the Family for its courage and daring and simultaneously begged the viewers' pardon for those qualities. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide All in the Family: Writing the President Incensed that Mike has written a stern and critical letter to President Nixon, super-patriotic Archie tries to set things right by penning his own missive to the Chief Executive. "Dear Mr. President...Your Honor...Sir..." -- and Archie even dons a clean shirt and tie for the occasion. Scripted by Paul Harrison, Lennie Weinrib, and Norman Lear from a story by Les Erwin and Fred Freiberger, "Writing the President" originally aired on January 19, 1971. Though withdrawn from CBS' daytime rerun package of All in the Family at the request of producer Lear (who felt that Archie's behavior was ridiculous even for him), the episode has since been restored to the series' syndicated package. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide All in the Family: Archie Gives Blood Archie balks at the notion of donating blood at the local Red Cross. When Mike accuses him of being chicken, Archie protests that he doesn't want to give up a precious pint of his own "pure" blood unless he can be certain that the recipient will not be a member of a minority group. Archie's ethnocentric monologues in this episode are so incredibly convoluted that one almost grudgingly admires his stubborn stupidity. Written by series coproducer Norman Lear, "Archie Gives Blood" first aired on February 2, 1971, replacing the originally scheduled episode "Judging Books by Covers." ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide All in the Family: Gloria Is Pregnant When Gloria announces that she's pregnant, both Mike and Archie blanche in terror. Not only did Mike enter into matrimony with the understanding that there wouldn't be any children, but he just plain can't afford to be a father. As for Archie, he is dead set against Gloria bringing a "little Meathead" into the world. The ending of this episode is especially poignant, with Archie revealing a heretofore well-hidden tender and comp
  • All in the Family - The Complete Second Season

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Sep 1, 2009

    Includes - All in the Family: The Saga of Cousin Oscar (1971) All in the Family: Christmas Day at the Bunkers (1971) All in the Family: Cousin Maude's Visit (1971) All in the Family: The Man in the Street (1971) All in the Family: The Insurance Is Cancelled (1971) All in the Family: Mike's Problem (1971) All in the Family: The Blockbuster (1971) All in the Family: Edith's Accident (1971) All in the Family: The Election Story (1971) All in the Family: Flashback - Mike Meets Archie (1971) All in the Family: Gloria Poses in the Nude (1971) All in the Family: Edith Writes a Song (1971) All in the Family: Archie and the Lock-Up (1971) All in the Family: The Elevator Story (1972) All in the Family: Edith's Problem (1972) All in the Family: Mike's Mysterious Son (1972) All in the Family: Archie and Edith Alone (1972) All in the Family: Sammy's Visit (1972) All in the Family: Maude (1972) All in the Family: Archie Is Jealous (1972) All in the Family: Edith the Judge (1972) All in the Family: Edith Gets a Mink (1972) All in the Family: Archie Sees a Mugging (1972) All in the Family: Archie and the FBI (1972) All in the Family: The Saga of Cousin Oscar Season two of All in the Family commenced on September 18, 1971 with yet another taboo-banning episode. Scripted by Burt Styler and Norman Lear from a story by Styler, "The Saga of Cousin Oscar" dared to turn a subject as serious as death into a joke. No one in the Bunker family can abide freeloading cousin Oscar, least of all Archie. Thus, when Oscar has the audacity to drop dead in Archie and Edith's upstairs bedroom, poor Arch is stuck with the funeral expenses -- and the eulogy. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide All in the Family: Christmas Day at the Bunkers Christmas is anything but merry in the Bunker household this year. Anticipating his usual Christmas bonus, Archie makes like a modern-day Scrooge when the bonus doesn't come through. Meanwhile, Edith, Gloria, and Mike try to make the best of things for themselves and their erstwhile dinner guests, the Jeffersons. Written by Don Nicholl, "Christmas Day at the Bunkers" was appropriately telecast on December 18, 1971 -- then inappropriately rerun in July 1972. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide All in the Family: Cousin Maude's Visit Bea Arthur makes her first-ever appearance as Maude Findlay, ultra-conservative Archie's ultra-liberal cousin. Described by Archie as "the original creeping socialist," Maude has steered clear of the Bunker household for years. But when the entire family comes down with the flu, "Maudie" arrives to take care of the household -- and, of course, to cross ideological swords with Archie. Written by Philip Mishkin, Michael Ross, and Bernie West, "Cousin Maude's Visit" was originally network-cast on December 11, 1971. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide All in the Family: The Man in the Street Interviewed by a WCBS-TV reporter about Nixon's economic plan, Archie is thrilled to learn that his interview will appear on the evening news. Alas, the Bunkers' TV set is broken and practically every other set in the neighborhood is likewise incapacitated. After numerous frustrations, Archie finally gets to see himself on the boob tube -- or does he? Neil J. Schwartz appears as Levy the repairman, who delivers the episode's funniest line. Written by Lennie Weinrib, Paul Harrison, and Don Nicholl from a story by Weinrib and Harrison (incidentally the same team responsible for the classic Saturday-morning series H.R. Pufnstuff), "The Man in the Streeet" first aired on December 4, 1971. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide All in the Family: The Insurance Is Cancelled So often the dispenser of thoughtless discrimination, Archie finds himself forced to take his own medicine. This occurs when the Bunkers' home insurance is canceled thanks to the company's new racial red-lining procedures. Archie's plight at home is contrasted with his on-the-job decision to lay off a Puerto Rican employee. Philip Proctor of Firesign Theater fame
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    Review: 'Girls' - 'I Saw You'

    Type: Post | Date: Sunday, Mar 16, 2014

    Hannah worries about time away from Adam, while Marnie and Desi perform
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    'Gravity' and '12 Years a Slave' tie at the 2014 PGA Awards

    Type: Post | Date: Monday, Jan 20, 2014

    'Frozen' and 'We Steal Secrets' take honors for animation and documentaries
  • James-gandolfini-51_home_top_story

    Notable Celebrity Deaths of 2013

    Type: Gallery | Date: Thursday, Dec 26, 2013

    Paul Walker, the star of "The Fast and The Furious" franchise ...
  • Tca-awards_home_top_story

    TCA Awards: Norman Lear to Amy Poehler to Boo from 'Bunheads'

    Type: Post | Date: Sunday, Aug 4, 2013

    Three very different winners all piroutted for the crowd
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    'Breaking Bad,' 'Game of Thrones,' 'Parks and Recreation' win big at TCA Awards

    Type: Post | Date: Sunday, Aug 4, 2013

    The TCA also recognized 'Big Bang Theory,' Tatiana Maslany, 'Bunheads,' Louis C.K. and more
  • Dads-tca_home_top_story

    Press Tour: 'Dads' cast, creators discuss offensive humor

    Type: Post | Date: Thursday, Aug 1, 2013

    Is the new Seth MacFarlane live-action sitcom racist?
  • Mom_home_top_story

    Press Tour: 'Mom''s Chuck Lorre, Anna Faris talk drugs, vampires, laughs

    Type: Post | Date: Monday, Jul 29, 2013

    Justin Long and Octavia Spencer will be added to the mix
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    15 Network TV Summer Successes

    Type: Gallery | Date: Monday, Jul 1, 2013

    Premiered: August 5, 2003   In the summer of 2003, one year before the...
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