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78 search results for Johnny Storm

  • They_might_be_giants_home_top_story

    They Might Be Giants - "Join Us"

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Jul 19, 2011

    From inspired electronic excursions to blazing mind-crushers featuring their legendary barn-storming live band--They Might Be Giants is BACK
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    Short Circuit 2 [Blu-ray]

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Apr 19, 2011

    More "human" than ever, upbeat Johnny's out for some "urban input", but some street hoods see his innocence as their high-tech ticket to easy street
  • Pirates_trilogy_br_home_top_story

    Pirates of the Caribbean Trilogy (Seven-Disc Blu-ray)

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Mar 1, 2011

    The complete Pirates of Caribbean Trilogy now available on Blu-ray
  • Untouchables: Season 3, Vol. 2

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Nov 10, 2009

    Includes:The Untouchables: The Monkey Wrench (1962) The Untouchables: The Case Against Elliot Ness (1962) The Untouchables: Man in the Middle (1962) The Untouchables: Takeover (1962) The Untouchables: The Stryker Brothers (1962) The Untouchables: Element of Danger (1962) The Untouchables: The Maggie Storm Story (1962) The Untouchables: Downfall (1962) The Untouchables: The Ginnie Littlesmith Story (1962) The Untouchables: Arsenal (1962) The Untouchables: Pressure (1962) The Untouchables: The Contract (1962) The Untouchables: The Monkey Wrench To improve the taste of his beer, Frank Nitti (Bruce Gordon) brings several expert German "braumeisters" into the country. This doesn't rest well with Nitti's rival Joe Kulak (Oscar Beregi), whose own revenue from bootleg beer takes a big hit. Caught in the crossfire are the hapless brewers, several of whom end up at the wrong end of a tommy-gun. To end the bloodshed, Elliot Ness (Robert Stack) is forced into an uneasy alliance with mob widow Mady (Dolores Dorn), who has been renting her country home to the German "visitors"--and whose loyalties are, to say the least, somewhat in doubt. Warren Kemmerling takes over from both Lawrence Dobkin and Robert J. Wilke as Dutch Schultz in this final episode of The Untouchables' third season. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Untouchables: The Case Against Elliot Ness With the 1933 Chicago World's Fair opening in a few days, the three Endicott brothers manage to secure several franchises on the fairgrounds. But not for long: the Endicotts are murdered, and gangsters are put in their place. It's all the handiwork of Mitchell Grandin (Pat Hingle), a wealthy and highly respected member of Chicago's social elite who carries on a secret life as a racketeer. In his efforts to get the goods on Grandin, Elliot Ness (Robert Stack) is tricked into publicly charging the man with the murder of two-bit thug Dolph Cagle (Cliff Carnell), leaving Ness wide open for a costly slander suit. But for all his cleverness, Grandin hadn't counted on the intervention of a certain Frank Nitti (Bruce Gordon)--to say nothing of Dolph Cagle's "widow" Fran (Jeanne Cooper). ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Untouchables: Man in the Middle Martin Balsam essays the title role in this episode as nightclub owner Benjy Leemer. Caught in the middle of a turf war between slot-machine "czar" Joe Bohman (Tom Drake) and gambler Porker Davis (Gavin MacLeod), Leemer ends up with his business burned to the ground and his songstress wife Julie (Cloris Leachman) out of a job. Amidst several symbolic scenes with a pair of "tame" rats, Benjy quietly plots vengeance against both Bohman and Davis--while Julie appears to cross over to the enemy by becoming Bohman's main squeeze. Fans of The Mary Tyler Moore Show will be impressed by the noncomic performances of that series' "Murray" and "Phyllis"...even though Gavin MacLeod and Cloris Leachman never appear together in the same scene.. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Untouchables: Takeover Three weeks prior to the repeal of Prohibition, Woody O'Mara (Mort Mills) prepares to eliminate brewery operator Franz Koenig (played by Hogan's Heroes' future "Sgt. Schultz" John Banner) so that he and Charlie Zenko (Luther Adler) can take over all illegal liquor activities on the North Side before it's too late. Zenko shows his "gratitude" by planting a bomb in O'Mara's car and assuming command of the entire operation himself. Ironically, Zenko himself ends up being betrayed by his own son Larry (Robert Loggia)--leaving Elliot Ness (Robert Stack) to solemnly pick up the pieces. Watch for Leonard Nimoy as a squirrelly trigger man named Packy. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Untouchables: The Stryker Brothers No sooner have they been released from prison than the four Stryker brothers pick up where they left off, assuming control of a string of night clubs and all illegal traffic within. In dire need of extra money to keep their operation afloat, the brothers plan to rob a mail shipment--and to this end, they coax a professional arsonist named Jaeger (Nehemiah Persoff in a less villainous role than usual) out of retirement. Only when the Strykers renege on their promise to pay Jaeger the 20 grand they promised him does the scheme unravel, allowing Elliot Ness (Robert Stack) to mete out justice. Frank Sutton, aka Gomer Pyle USMC's Sergeant Carter, makes the first of four Untouchables appearances, here cast as the youngest and most timorous of the Stryker brothers. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Untouchables: Element of Danger In his second Untouchables appearance, Lee Marvin is disturbingly convincing as Victor Rate, a brilliant psychopath in cahoots with narcotics kingpin Arnold Stegler (Victor Jory). A cool customer who gets his kicks by deliberately placing himself in dangerous situations, Rate has no qualms about gunning down a government agent in broad daylight, then loading 50,000 pounds of opium onto a truck while the terrified witnesses look on in amazement. To bring this human monster to justice, Elliot Ness (Robert Stack) employs the services of a movie cameraman, a professional lipreader...and Arnold Stegler, who in a futile effort to get himself off the hook ends up signing his own death warrant. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Untouchables: The Maggie Storm Story One year before her Oscar-winning performance in Hud, Patricia Neal guest-starred in this Untouchables episode as torch singer Maggie Storm (and never mind that we never hear her sing a note at any time). Maggie is the featured entertainer at the 808 Club, a night spot mentioned by dying drug peddler Benny Rivas (Herman Rudin) after a shootout with the Untouchables. Following this clue, Elliot Ness (Robert Stack) pays a visit to the club, thereby renewing an old acquaintance with Maggie (they'd been "friendly enemies" during Probibition). Ness would like to believe that Maggie isn't involved in the blatant drug trafficking that goes on at the club, but the evidence is stacked against her. Even so, she isn't the real villain of the piece: that honor is reserved for an unsavory character named Vince Shyre (Vic Morrow). Joseph Ruskin makes his first series appearance as the infamous Louis "Lepke" Buchalter. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Untouchables: Downfall This episode is set in the late 1920s, explaining why Federal agent Elliot Ness (Robert Stack) appears to still be a bachelor. Bootlegger Pete "The Persuader" Kalminski has been encountering a lot of trouble getting his shipments past Ness and the Untouchables. Enter Joey December (Steven Hill), a second-generation railroad owner facing bankruptcy. For a piece of the action, Joey offers to tranport the liquor right under the Feds' noses on his railroad cars. It seems like the perfect set-up--until Joey commits the fatal error of trying to shake down Kalminski for additional money, using as leverage the written "deathbed confession" of one of Al Capone's boys. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Untouchables: The Ginnie Littlesmith Story When her gangster uncle is gunned down in the soup kitchen where "Untouchable" Rossi (Nick Georgiade) is working undercover, mild-mannered Ginnie Littlesmith (Phyllis Love) falls heir to her uncle's record books, which chronicle all illegal activities of a criminal organization known as The Group. Though Elliot Ness (Robert Stack) would dearly love to get his hands on those books, Ginnie intends to keep them in her possession, the better to extract $100,000 from her uncle's former associates. What Ginnie doesn't know is that she is being set up for betrayal by her own boyfriend (Don Gordon). ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Untouchables: Arsenal Once again, Frank Nitti (Bruce Gordon) crosses swords with rival gangster Bugs Moran (previously played by Lloyd Nolan, here enacted by Robert J. Wilke). To avoid an all-out gang war, Elliot Ness (Robert Stack) begin confiscating all the machine guns owned by the two mobsters' torpedoes. To keep himself armed, Nitti makes a deal for a dozen Tommy guns with Polish gunsmith Jan Tobek (Kevin Hagen). Trouble is, once Nitti and Moran agree to call off the war, both Tobek and his wife Eva (Salome Jens) will be eminently expendable. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Untouchables: Pressure Drug kingpin Louie Madikoff (Harold J. Stone) ends up half a million dollars in the red when several of his dope shipments are intercepted by Elliot Ness (Robert Stack). In desperation, Louie warns Ness that if any more of his deliveries are stopped, he'll blow up a school full of children--and brings in professional "torch" Artie Krebs (Warren Oates) in case he has to carry out his threat. Meanwhile, a Romeo-and-Juliet romance between Madikoff's son Danny (Darryl Hickman) and Francey Pavanos (Collin Wilcox), the daughter of Louie's hated rival Mike Pavanos (Booth Colman), may well prove fatal for all concerned. With this episode, Robert Carricart returns to the role of Lucky Luciano. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Untouchables: The Contract Knowing that syndicate errand boy Smiley Barris (Frank Sutton) has enough information to send him to the chair, Joe Kulak (Oscar Beregi) orders his hired torpedoes to bump Smiley off. When his plans are thwarted by Elliot Ness (Robert Stack), Kulak brings in an out-of-town assassin named John Quist (John Larkin). Now on the lam from both Ness and Quist, Smiley seeks protection from high-rolling gambler Johnny Templar (a "Bugsy Siegel" clone played by Harry Guardino). Both Johnny and his girlfriend Jeanne (Gloria Talbott) take a liking to Smiley and do everything they can to help him--which turns out to be a fatal miscalculation. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide
  • Johnny Storm - Rockin' Machine

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Oct 6, 2009

    Johnny Storm - Rockin' Machine
  • Midnight Mysteries Collection

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Sep 8, 2009

    Includes:Scarlet Street (1945) The Stranger (1946), MPAA Rating: NR The Red House (1947) The Scar (1948) Inner Sanctum (1948) Woman on the Run (1950) Scarlet Street Masterfully directed by Fritz Lang, Scarlet Street is a bleak film in which an ordinary man succumbs first to vice and then to murder. Christopher Cross (Edward G. Robinson) is a lonely man married to a nagging wife. Painting is the only thing that brings him joy. Cross meets Kitty (Joan Bennett) who, believing him to be a famous painter, begins an affair with him. Encouraged by her lover, con man Johnny Prince (Dan Duryea) Kitty persuades Cross to embezzle money from his employer in order to pay for her lavish apartment. In that apartment, happy for the first time in his life, Cross paints Kitty's picture. Johnny then pretends that Kitty painted to portrait, which has won great critical acclaim. Finally realizing he has been manipulated, Cross kills Kitty, loses his job, and because his name has been stolen by Kitty, is unable to paint. He suffers a mental breakdown as the film ends, haunted by guilt. Kitty and Johnny are two of the most amoral and casual villains in the history of film noir, both like predatory animals completely without conscience. Milton Krasner's photography is excellent in its use of stark black-and-white to convey psychological states. Fritz Lang is unparalleled in his ability to convey the desperation of hapless, naïve victims in a cruelly realistic world. ~ Linda Rasmussen, All Movie Guide The Stranger The Stranger is often considered Orson Welles' most "traditional" Hollywood-style directorial effort. Welles plays a college professor named Charles Rankin, who lives in a pastoral Connecticut town with his lovely wife Mary (Loretta Young). One afternoon, an extremely nervous German gentleman named Meineke (Konstantin Shayne) arrives in town. Professor Rankin seems disturbed--but not unduly so--by Meineke's presence. He invites the stranger for a walk in the woods, and as they journey farther and farther away from the center of town, we learn that kindly professor Rankin is actually notorious Nazi war criminal Franz Kindler. Conscience-stricken by his own genocidal wartime activities, Meineke has come to town to beg his ex-superior Kindler to give himself up. The professor responds by brutally murdering his old associate. If Kindler believes himself safe--and he has every reason to do so, since no one in town, especially Mary, has any inkling of his previous life--he will change his mind in a hurry when mild-mannered war crimes commissioner Wilson (Edward G. Robinson) pays a visit, posing as an antiques dealer. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Red House Delmer Daves directs the noirish thriller The Red House, based on the novel by George Agnew Chamberlain. Edward G. Robinson plays Pete Morgan, a farmer who harbors dark secrets and refuses to let anyone near the red house in the woods behind the house. In order to fend off trespassers, he hires Teller (Rory Calhoun) to stand guard. He lives with his sister, Ellen (Judith Anderson), and his adopted daughter, Meg (Allene Roberts). When they hire Meg's friend, Nath Storm (Lon McCallister), to help out on the farm, the two kids start to wonder about the mysterious red house. The film features an eerie original score by Miklós Rózsa. ~ Andrea LeVasseur, All Movie Guide The Scar John Muller (Paul Henreid), an intelligent, arrogant criminal who has been a medical student and a phony psychoanalyst, believes that people are only interested in themselves and do not notice what is happening around them. Paroled from prison to a boring job, Muller is more interested in a big score, and along with his old cronies robs a crooked gambling joint owned by Rocky Stansyck (Thomas Brown Henry). Although he gets away with the money, some of his men are caught by Stansyck and identify John as the ringleader. On the run from Stansyck's gang, he is mistaken for Dr. Bartok, a psychiatrist also played by H
  • Zombie Classics

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Sep 22, 2009

    Includes:White Zombie (1932), MPAA Rating: NR Revenge of the Zombies (1943) Night of the Living Dead (1968), MPAA Rating: NR Oasis of the Zombies (1982) White Zombie It is altogether typical of Bela Lugosi's lousy business judgement that he accepted one of his finest film roles for a mere $500 dollars. In the haunting low-budgeter White Zombie, Lugosi stars as Murder Legendre, a shadowy character who exercises supernatural powers over the natives in his Haitian domain. Coveting beautiful Madge Bellamy as his bride, wealthy Robert Frazier is refused her hand in marriage. He enters into an unholy agreement with Lugosi, whereby Madge will fall ill and die, then be resurrected as a zombie-and, implicitly, Frazier's love-slave. This is accomplished, but Lugosi, relishing the hold he has over Frazier, refuses to release Madge's soul. She is ultimately rescued from Living Death by her faithful beau Robert Harron and missionary Joseph Cawthorn (heretofore merely the comedy relief). Few talkie horror films have ever so expertly captured the "feel" of the silent cinema as White Zombie; the film's ethereal, ghostlike ambience enables the audiences to accept even the most ludicrous of plot twists. The producers, Victor and Edward Halperin, use the film's tiny budget to their advantage, evocatively suggesting the horrors that they haven't the financial wherewithal to show on screen. Lugosi is superb throughout, making the most of such seemingly innocuous lines as "Well, well, we understand one another better, now." Long ignored or shunted aside as insignificant, White Zombie can hold its own with any of the like-vintage Universal horror classics. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Revenge of the Zombies The second of Monogram's "zombie" thrillers, Revenge of the Zombies is better than the first, if only because of its powerhouse cast. John Carradine does his usual as Von Alltermann, a mad scientist in the employ of the Nazis. Commissioned to create a race of "living dead" warriors for the Third Reich, Von Alltermann takes time out to attempt to revitalize his deceased wife Lila (Veda Ann Borg). Stumbling into the doc's laboratory is heroine Jen (Gale Storm), who is rescued in The Nick by undercover FBI agent Larry (Robert Lowery). As in King of the Zombies, Mantan Moreland provides his patented bug-eyed comedy relief; good taste aside, he's the best thing in the picture. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Night of the Living Dead When unexpected radiation raises the dead, a microcosm of Average America has to battle flesh-eating zombies in George A. Romero's landmark cheapie horror film. Siblings Johnny (Russ Streiner) and Barbara (Judith O'Dea) whine and pout their way through a graveside visit in a small Pennsylvania town, but it all takes a turn for the worse when a zombie kills Johnny. Barbara flees to an isolated farmhouse where a group of people are already holed up. Bickering and panic ensue as the group tries to figure out how best to escape, while hoards of undead converge on the house; news reports reveal that fire wards them off, while a local sheriff-led posse discovers that if you "kill the brain, you kill the ghoul." After a night of immolation and parricide, one survivor is left in the house.... Romero's grainy black-and-white cinematography and casting of locals emphasize the terror lurking in ordinary life; as in Alfred Hitchcock's The Birds (1963), Romero's victims are not attacked because they did anything wrong, and the randomness makes the attacks all the more horrifying. Nothing holds the key to salvation, either, whether it's family, love, or law. Topping off the existential dread is Romero's then-extreme use of gore, as zombies nibble on limbs and viscera. Initially distributed by a Manhattan theater chain owner, Night, made for about 100,000 dollars, was dismissed as exploitation, but after a 1969 re-release, it began to attract favorable attention for scarily tapping into Vietnam-era uncertainty and nihilistic a
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    Marvel exposes the 'Original Sin' of the 'Fantastic Four'

    Type: Gallery | Date: Monday, Mar 31, 2014

    What is the secret which is terrible enough to sever the bond between the Thi...
  • Ff-cvr-006_home_top_story

    Marvel exposes the 'Original Sin' of the 'Fantastic Four'

    Type: Article | Date: Monday, Mar 31, 2014

    What dark secret is the Fantastic Four keeping from Ben Grimm?
  • Morganfreemanjohnnydeppcinemacon2014_home_top_story_1

    'Godzilla,' 'Jupiter Ascending' and 'Horrible Bosses 2' win WB's CinemaCon sneak

    Type: Post | Date: Friday, Mar 28, 2014

    Plus: A short preview of "The Hobbit: There and Back Again'
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