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223 search results for Heroes For Hire

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    11 Criminally Underused Lady Villains 'The Amazing Spider-Man' Is Wasting

    Type: Gallery | Date: Thursday, Apr 17, 2014

    Powers/Weapons: Her scorpion suit which give her enhanced speed and strength....
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    The Expendables 2 [Blu-ray + Digital Copy + UltraViolet]

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Nov 20, 2012

    The Expendables are compelled to seek revenge in hostile territory where the odds are stacked against them
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    The Expendables 2 - DVD

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Nov 20, 2012

    The Expendables are compelled to seek revenge in hostile territory where the odds are stacked against them
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    Puss in Boots (Two-disc Blu-ray/DVD Combo + Digital Copy)

    Type: Event | Date: Friday, Feb 24, 2012

    The Shrek spin-off, plus a bonus movie
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    Puss in Boots (Three-Disc Combo: Blu-ray 3D/Blu-ray/DVD/Digital Copy)

    Type: Event | Date: Friday, Feb 24, 2012

    The Shrek spin-off starring Antonio Banderas, Selma Hayek and more
  • TCM Greatest Classic Films Collection: Romance

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Feb 2, 2010

    Includes:Now, Voyager (1942) Mogambo (1953) Love in the Afternoon (1957) Splendor in the Grass (1961) Now, Voyager Olive Higgins Prouty's popular novel was transformed into nearly two hours of high-grade soap opera by several masters of the trade: Warner Bros., Bette Davis, Paul Henreid, director Irving Rapper, and screenwriter Casey Robinson. Davis plays repressed Charlotte Vale, dying on the vine thanks to her domineering mother (Gladys Cooper). All-knowing psychiatrist Dr. Jaquith (Claude Rains) urges Charlotte to make several radical changes in her life, quoting Walt Whitman: "Now voyager sail thou forth to seek and find." Slowly, Charlotte emerges from her cocoon of tight hairdos and severe clothing to blossom into a gorgeous fashion plate. While on a long ocean voyage, she falls in love with Jerry Durrance (Henreid), who is trapped in a loveless marriage. After kicking over the last of her traces at home, Charlotte selflessly becomes a surrogate mother to Jerry's emotionally disturbed daughter (a curiously uncredited Janis Wilson), who is on the verge of becoming the hysterical wallflower that Charlotte once was. An interim romance with another man (John Loder) fails to drive Jerry from Charlotte's mind. The film ends ambiguously; Jerry is still married, without much chance of being divorced from his troublesome wife, but the newly self-confident Charlotte is willing to wait forever if need be. "Don't ask for the moon," murmurs Charlotte as Max Steiner's romantic music reaches a crescendo, "we have the stars." In addition to this famous line, Now, Voyager also features the legendary "two cigarettes" bit, in which Jerry places two symbolic cigarettes between his lips, lights them both, and hands one to Charlotte. The routine would be endlessly lampooned in subsequent films, once by Henreid himself in the satirical sword-and-sandal epic Siren of Baghdad (1953). ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Mogambo The 1953 Clark Gable film Mogambo is a remake of Gable's 1932 seriocomic adventure Red Dust. Where the earlier film was lensed on the MGM backlot, Mogambo was shot on location in Africa by director John Ford. Gable is safari leader Victor Marswell, who plays "host" to stranded Eloise Y. Kelly (Ava Gardner, who is no better than she ought to be but is just right for our raffish hero -- the Gardner role was originally played along franker pre-Code lines by Jean Harlow). Anthropologist Donald Nordley (Donald Sinden) hires Victor to lead him into the deepest, darkest jungle. Along for the ride is Donald's wife, Linda (Grace Kelly), outwardly cool as a cucumber but secretly harboring a lust for Victor. Scorned, Kelly tries to kill Victor, but true-blue Eloise takes the blame for the shooting. Reportedly, Grace Kelly carried on an off-camera romance with Clark Gable, which ended when the differences in their ages proved insurmountable. Even so, it is the easy rapport between Gable and Ava Gardner which stole the show in Mogambo. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Love in the Afternoon Gary Cooper more or less repeats his international-roue characterization from 1938's Bluebeard's Eighth Wife for the 1957 romantic comedy Love in the Afternoon (both films were co-scripted by Billy Wilder, who also directed the latter picture). Audrey Hepburn co-stars as the daughter of Parisian private eye Maurice Chevalier. Investigating the amorous activities of Cooper, Chevalier relates what he's discovered to cuckolded husband John McGiver, who declares that he's going after Cooper with a pistol. Overhearing this conversation, Hepburn rushes off to rescue Cooper. She keeps him far away from McGiver by adopting a "woman of the world" pose. Cooper quickly sees through this charade; still, she is fascinated by Hepburn and attempts to relocate her after she disappears. Meeting Chevalier one day, Cooper relates the story of the Mystery Woman, never dreaming that he is describing Chevalier's daughter. Equally in the dark, Chevalier offers to locate the elusive Hepburn. Once he's tumbled to the fact that his quarry is his own flesh and blood, Chevalier advises Hepburn against contemplating a relationship with the much-older Cooper. She, of course, fails to heed this warning, setting the stage for an ultraromantic finale. Love in the Afternoon is highlighted by a superb running gag involving a quartet of gypsy violinists, who insist upon dogging Cooper's trail wherever he goes-including a steam bath. Love in the Afternoon was adapted by Wilder and I.A.L. Diamond from the novel Ariane by Claude Anet. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Splendor in the Grass 1961's premiere "date" movie represented the screen debut of Warren Beatty. Set in the 1920s, William Inge's screenplay concerns the superheated romance between working-class high schooler Natalie Wood and rich kid Beatty. Trying their best to keep their relationship from going "all the way," Beatty and Wood go through a series of unsatisfying interim romances. The troubled Wood attempts suicide and is sent to a mental institution, while Beatty impregnates freewheeling waitress Zohra Lampert. Wood and Beatty still carry a torch for one another, but circumstances preclude their getting together -- and besides, Wood suddenly realizes that she's outgrown the still-floundering Beatty. Scriptwriter William Inge shows up as a minister in Splendor in the Grass, while comedienne Phyllis Diller does a cameo as famed nightclub entertainer Texas Guinan; also, keep an eye out for Sandy Dennis, making her first movie appearance. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide
  • TCM Greatest Classic Films Collection: Marx Brothers

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Feb 2, 2010

    Includes:A Day at the Races (1937) Room Service (1938), MPAA Rating: NR At the Circus (1939) A Night in Casablanca (1946) A Day at the Races A Day at the Races was the Marx Brothers' follow-up to their incomparable A Night at the Opera. Groucho Marx is cast as Hugo Z. Hackenbush, a veterinarian who passes himself off as a human doctor when summoned by wealthy hypochondriac Emily Upjohn (Margaret Dumont) to take over the financially strapped Standish Sanitarium. Chico Marx plays the sanitarium's general factotum, who works without pay because he has a soft spot for its owner, lovely Judy Standish (Maureen O'Sullivan). Harpo Marx portrays a jockey at the local racetrack, constantly bullied by the evil Morgan (Douglass Dumbrille), who will take over the sanitarium if Judy can't pay its debts. After several side-splitting routines--Chico selling Groucho tips on the races, Chico and Harpo rescuing Groucho from the clutches of femme fatale Esther Muir, all three Marxes conducting a lunatic "examination" of Margaret Dumont--the fate of the sanitarium rests on a Big Race involving Hi-Hat, a horse belonging to the film's nominal hero, Allan Jones. Virtually everything that worked in "Opera" is trotted out again for "Races", including a hectic slapstick finale wherein the Marxes lay waste to a public event. What is missing here is inspiration; perhaps this is due to the fact that MGM producer Irving Thalberg, whose input was so essential to the success of "Opera", died during the filming of "Races". Even so, Day at the Races made more money than any other previous Marx Brothers film--the result being that MGM, in the spirit of "they loved it once", would continue recycling Races' best bits for the studio's next three Marx vehicles. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Room Service Having paid $255,500 for the rights to John Murray and Allen Boretz' Broadway hit Room Service, RKO Radio then scouted about for a "perfect" cast. Thanks to the persistence of show-biz agent Zeppo Marx, RKO was able to secure the services of Zeppo's brothers Groucho, Harpo and Chico Marx for $100,000. The result is an uneven but entertaining blend of traditional stage farce and Marxian madness. Groucho plays two-bit producer Gordon Miller, who has gone deeply into debt while trying to stage a turgid production called "Hail and Farewell". Miller and his entire cast are ensconced in the Great White Way Hotel, managed by his brother-in-law Gribble Cliff Dunstan, who is fed up with the troupe's inability to pay its bills. As Miller, his director Harry Binelli (Chico) and his business manager Faker Englund (Harpo) try to figure out new methods of raising money, in walks Leo Davis Frank Albertson, the wide-eyed playwright, who is unaware that his masterpiece is in danger of closing before it even opens. He soon figures out what's what after Harry and Faker hock his typewriter for eating money. When hotel inspector Wagner Donald MacBride threatens to throw Miller and his entourage out bag and baggage, the producer and his cronies fake a measles epidemic so that Wagner will be forced to allow them to stay. Salvation seems at hand when Jenkins Philip Wood, a potential backer, arrives with a blank check in hand. But after sampling a bit of the lunacy that has surrounded the play since its inception, Jenkins dashes off, refusing to finance such a chancy property. Miller manages to mollify Wagner by pretending that Jenkins has invested money in the show, but when this scheme falls through, our hero resorts to really drastic measures by pretending that Davis and Faker have both committed suicide because of Wagner's persecution. Weaving in and out of the proceedings are nominal heroines Lucille Ball and Ann Miller, as well as Philip Loeb (who played Faker in the original Broadway production), brilliantly cast as a mild-mannered bill collector. Room Service is hardly typical Marx Bros. fare, despite the efforts by screenwriter Morris Ryskind to inject characteristic verbal gags and visual bits into the action; the film works better as a situation comedy than as a Marx vehicle (Groucho's only comment on the subject was that his brother Zeppo should have arranged a larger salary). In 1943, RKO Radio remade Room Service as a musical titled Step Lively, which was actually something of an improvement on the original. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide At the Circus A distinct letdown from their previous MGM films, the Marx Bros.' At the Circus nonetheless contains intermittent moments of high hilarity. When Jeff Wilson (Kenny Baker) is in danger of losing his circus to crooked creditor Carter (James Burke), Jeff's faithful roustabout Antonio (Chico Marx) enlists the aid of seedy attorney J. Cheever Loophole (Groucho Marx). Despite the best efforts of Loophole, Antonio and general hanger-on Punchy (Harpo Marx), Jeff is robbed of the circus payroll by two flies in the ointment, Goliath the Strong Man (Nat Pendleton) and Little Professor Atom (Jerry Marenghi, later known as Jerry Maren). Also in on the plot to wrest control of the circus is aerialist Peerless Pauline (Eve Arden), with whom Loophole has a cozy tete-a-tete while walking on the ceiling (no kidding!) In a last-ditch effort to raise the necessary funds, Loophole romances Jeff's wealthy aunt Mrs. Dukesbury (Margaret Dumont). The finale takes place at a fancy society party at the Dukesbury mansion, with Punchy and Antonio hijacking the scheduled entertainment and replacing it with a full-fledged circus performance. Weighed down by an excess of plot and a surfeit of misfire gags, not to mention one of sappiest romantic subplots in film history (involving sappy tenor Kenny Baker and sappier ingenue Florence Rice), At the Circus still keeps audiences happy with Groucho's rendition of the deathless "Lydia the Tatooed Lady" (by Harold Arlen and E. Y. Harburg) and the zany denoument, wherein pompous conductor Fritz Feld and his orchestra are set adrift in the middle of the ocean and the magnificent Margaret Dumont is shot out of a cannon. Best gag: When Eve Arden stuffs the circus payroll into her blouse, Groucho turns to the camera and whispers "There must be some way of getting that money back without offending the Hays Office." ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide A Night in Casablanca After a five-year absence, the Marx Brothers returned to the screen in the independently-produced effort A Night in Casablanca. Originally conceived as a parody of Casablanca (with character names like "Humphrey Bogus" and "Lowen Behold"), the film emerged as a spoof of wartime melodramas in general. Someone has been methodically murdering the managers of the Hotel Casablanca, and that someone is escaped Nazi war criminal Heinrich Stubel (Sig Ruman). Disguised as a Count Pfefferman, Stubel intends to reclaim the stolen art treasures that he's hidden in a secret room somewhere in the hotel, and the only way he can do this undetected is by bumping off the managers and taking over the hotel himself. The newest manager of Hotel Casablanca is former motel proprietor Ronald Kornblow (Groucho Marx), who, blissfully unaware that he's been hired only because no one else will take the job, immediately takes charge in his own inimitably inept fashion. Corbacchio (Chico Marx), owner of the Yellow Camel company, appoints himself as Kornblow's bodyguard, aided and abetted by Stubel's mute valet Rusty (Harpo Marx). In his efforts to kill Kornblow, Stubel dispatches femme fatale Beatrice Reiner (Lisette Verea) to romance the lecherous manager, leading to a hilarious recreation of a key comedy sequence in the Marxes' earlier A Day at the Races. Arrested on a trumped-up charge, Kornblow, Corbacchio and Rusty escape in time to foil Stubel and his stooges. As in most Marx Brothers epics, A Night in Casablanca includes a tiresome romantic subplot, this time involving disgraced French flyer (Pierre) and his faithful sweetheart Annette (Lois Collier). Though hampered by listless direction and witless one-liners, A Night in Casablanca contains enough hilarity to compensate for its many flaws; some of the best visual gags were conceived by an uncredited Frank Tashlin, including Harpo's legendary "holding up the building" bit. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide
  • G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero: The Complete Series

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Nov 10, 2009

    Includes:G.I. Joe: Twenty Questions (1985) G.I. Joe: Eye For an Eye (1985) G.I. Joe: The Traitor, Part Two (1985) G.I. Joe: Skeleton in the Closet (1985) G.I. Joe: Countdown for Zartan (1985) G.I. Joe: No Place Like Springfield, Part Two (1985) G.I. Joe: No Place Like Springfield, Part One (1985) G.I. Joe: The Great Alaskan Land Rush (1985) G.I. Joe: The Invaders (1985) G.I. Joe: The Wrong Stuff (1985) G.I. Joe: The Pit of Vipers (1985) G.I. Joe: Memories of Mara (1985) G.I. Joe: Pyramid of Darkness, Part Three (1985) G.I. Joe: Pyramid of Darkness, Part Two (1985) G.I. Joe: Operation Mind Menace (1985) G.I. Joe: The Funhouse (1985) G.I. Joe: Cobra's Creatures (1985) G.I. Joe: Jungle Trap (1985) G.I. Joe: Cobra Stops the World (1985) G.I. Joe: Satellite Down (1985) G.I. Joe: Red Rocket's Glare (1985) G.I. Joe: Cobra Soundwaves (1985) G.I. Joe: Money to Burn (1985) G.I. Joe: Cobra's Candidate (1985) G.I. Joe: Lights! Camera! Cobra! (1985) G.I. Joe: The Phantom Brigade (1985) G.I. Joe: The Synthoid Conspiracy, Part Two (1985) G.I. Joe: The Synthoid Conspiracy, Part One (1985) G.I. Joe: Haul Down the Heavens (1985) G.I. Joe: The Greenhouse Effect (1985) G.I. Joe: Spell of the Siren (1985) G.I. Joe: The Viper is Coming (1985) G.I. Joe: The Germ (1985) G.I. Joe: The Battle for the Train of Gold (1985) G.I. Joe: Pyramid of Darkness, Part Four (1985) G.I. Joe: Pyramid of Darkness, Part One (1985) G.I. Joe: Lasers in the Night (1985) G.I. Joe: The Gamesmaster (1985) G.I. Joe: Where the Reptiles Roam (1985) G.I. Joe: Hearts and Cannons (1985) G.I. Joe: Flint's Vacation (1985) G.I. Joe: Primordial Plot (1985) G.I. Joe: The Gods Below (1985) G.I. Joe: Cobra CLAWs are Coming to Town (1985) G.I. Joe: Eau de Cobra (1985) G.I. Joe: Excalibur (1985) G.I. Joe: Bazooka Saw a Sea Serpent (1985) G.I. Joe: Cobra Quake (1985) G.I. Joe: Pyramid of Darkness, Part Five (1985) G.I. Joe: Cold Slither (1985) G.I. Joe: The Traitor, Part One (1985) G.I. Joe: Worlds Without End, Part Two (1985) G.I. Joe: Captives of Cobra, Part One (1985) G.I. Joe: Worlds Without End, Part One (1985) G.I. Joe: Captives of Cobra, Part Two (1985) G.I. Joe: Grey Hair and Growing Pains (1986) G.I. Joe: In the Presence of Mine Enemies (1986) G.I. Joe: Sins of Our Fathers (1986) G.I. Joe: Joe's Night Out (1986) G.I. Joe: Second Hand Emotions (1986) G.I. Joe: Nightmare Assault (1986) G.I. Joe: The Most Dangerous Thing in the World (1986) G.I. Joe: G.I. Joe and the Golden Fleece (1986) G.I. Joe: Ninja Holiday (1986) G.I. Joe: Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Part Five (1986) G.I. Joe: Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Part Four (1986) G.I. Joe: Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Part Three (1986) G.I. Joe: Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Part Two (1986) G.I. Joe: Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Part One (1986) G.I. Joe: The Spy That Rooked Me (1986) G.I. Joe: Glamour Girls (1986) G.I. Joe: Cobrathon (1986) G.I. Joe: Sink the Montana (1986) G.I. Joe: Raise the Flagg! (1986) G.I. Joe: My Brother's Keeper (1986) G.I. Joe: Iceberg Goes South (1986) G.I. Joe: The Rotten Egg (1986) G.I. Joe: Million Dollar Medic (1986) G.I. Joe: Once Upon a Joe... (1986) G.I. Joe: Let's Play Soldier (1986) G.I. Joe: Computer Complications (1986) G.I. Joe: Last Hour to Doomsday (1986) G.I. Joe: My Favorite Things (1986) G.I. Joe: Into Your Tent I Will Silently Creep (1986) G.I. Joe: Not a Ghost of a Chance (1986) G.I. Joe: Twenty Questions The Joe team's war games are interrupted by Hector Ramirez, muckraking host of the TV series "Twenty Questions." Ramirez has brought along a peacenik named Arnold, who claims that the Joes are frauds who use the threat of Cobra attack as a means to cheat the American taxpayers. Hoping to prove Arnold wrong, Shipwreck conducts an unauthorized tour of the Joes' headquarters -- only to discover that Arnold is really the evil Baroness in disguise. Written by Buzz Dixon, "Twenty Questions" made its American TV debut on October 2, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Eye For an Eye A fierce battle between the Cobras and the Joes has devastating consequences on a family of innocent bystanders. Though his loved ones are safe, Charles Fairmont is enraged over the destruction of his home. Invading the Joes' base in search of revenge, Fairmont finds an unexpected ally in the form of Lady Jaye, who feels personally responsible for the man's plight. Written by Steve Mitchell and Barbara Petty, "Eye for an Eye" made its American TV debut on November 8, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Traitor, Part Two In the conclusion of a two-part adventure, the Joes have rescued Dusty from prison, certain that his traitorous behavior was borne of desperation over the plight of his sick mother. But can Dusty be reformed, and will he prove a valuable member of the Joe team? Apparently not: When Cobra tries to test its new mind-control gas on the Joes, Dusty assists the villains every step of the way. Be assured, however, that the story is not quite over yet. Written by Buzz Dixon, part two of the "The Traitor" originally aired in America on November 26, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Skeleton in the Closet Upon receiving an inheritance, Joe member Lady Jaye journeys to her ancestral home in Scotland. Feeling that something is amiss, LJ soon learns the awful truth: She is related to her longtime enemy Destro. The ensuing battle royal between the Joes and Cobras turns out to be the result of a carefully mapped scheme by another old enemy. A neat twist caps this episode, which was written by Flint Dille. "Skeleton in the Closet" first aired in America on December 11, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Countdown for Zartan Zartan is hired by Cobra Commander to blow up a peace conference at World Wide Defense Center, thereby covering up secret information about Cobra's terrorist activities. Posing as a kidnapped French scientist, Zartan is exposed by Joe member Spirit -- who is promptly abducted by Storm Shadow. The other members of the Joe Team race against the clock to locate and disarm Zartan's bomb. Written by Christy Marx, "Countdown for Zartan" first aired in America on September 23, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: No Place Like Springfield, Part Two In the concluding chapter of a two-part story, Shipwreck finally realizes that his "new" life as a family man in the town of Springfield is actually a sham, created by Cobra to force him to reveal the deadly water-to-explosive formula locked in his subconscious. Rescued from madness by Polly, Shipwreck does his best to foil Cobra's plans -- if only he can locate the rest of the Joe Team. But there's a tragic price to pay for the good guys' ultimate victory. Written by Steve Gerber, "No Place Like Springfield, Pt. 2" first aired in America on December 13, 1985, as the final episode of G.I. Joe's first TV season. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: No Place Like Springfield, Part One In the first episode of a two-part adventure, Dr. Melany's new formula for changing water into explosive is planted in Shipwreck's subconscious -- and only Lady Jaye knows the code word that will release the formula. Upon awakening from an unusually deep sleep, Shipwreck discovers that several years have passed, and that his has settled down to a cozy domestic existence with his wife, Mara (formerly a mermaid), and his daughter. Slowly but surely, however, Shipwreck senses that something is not quite right about his new surroundings. Written by Steve Gerber, "No Place Like Springfield, Pt. 1" first aired in America on December 12, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Great Alaskan Land Rush Claiming to a have found a legal loophole in Seward's Alaskan purchase of 1867, Cobra and a shifty used car dealer named Gorgy Potemkin gain full control of Alaska. Their plans include using the 49th state as a power base to attack the rest of the world. Once again, the Joes join forces with the Soviet Oktober Guard to foil Cobra's scheme. Written by David Carren, "The Great Alaskan Land Rush" was first telecast in America on December 3, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Invaders Both the U.S. and the U.S.S.R. are held in thrall by an apparent alien invasion of Earth. It soon develops, however, that the "invasion" has been orchestrated by Cobra, as part of a scheme to destroy both Moscow and Washington and establish Cobra as the world's only superpower. This time around, the Joes are joined by their Soviet counterparts, the Oktober Guard, in thwarting the villain's plans. Written by Dennis O'Neil, "The Invaders" originally aired in America on November 29, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Wrong Stuff Could it be that writers Stanley Ralph Ross and Flint Dille had a certain Atlanta-based TV mogul in mind when they wrote this episode of G.I. Joe? On this occasion, Cobra removes all space satellites from orbit, the better to create a worldwide broadcasting monopoly, Cobra Network Television. By offering twisted "message" sitcoms like "Father's No Beast" and even (horrors!) changing the endings of classic old films, the CTN is aimed at controlling the minds of all earthlings -- or at least, all cable subscribers. "The Wrong Stuff" first aired in America on November 28, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Pit of Vipers The G.I. Joe team is placed under the command of the new super-computer Watchdog, which has ostensibly been designed to seek out Cobra targets. Little do the heroes realize that Watchdog has been created by the Cobras themselves, and is programmed to send the Joes far off the beaten track, leaving their headquarters vulnerable to Cobra's deadly Pit Viper attacks. James M. Ward wrote the script, from an original story by Flint Dille. "The Pit of Vipers" originally aired in the U.S. on November 27, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Memories of Mara The titular Mara is a blue-skinned women whom we first see wearing a Cobra diving suit. Rescued by Joe Team member Shipwreck, Mara reveals that she is the half-human, half-fish result of a misfire Cobra experiment aimed at enabling humans to remain underwater indefinitely. With Mara's help, the Joes try to locate the U.S.S. Nerka, a submarine stolen by Cobra. Written by Sharman Di Vono, "Memories of Mara" first aired in the U.S. on November 15, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Pyramid of Darkness, Part Three In the third episode of the five-part |Pyramid of Darkness, Joe Team members Lady Jaye, Flint, Shipwreck, and Snake Eyes have managed to escape the perils presented them in the previous episode, "Rendezvous in the City of the Dead." A new ally is introduced in the form of a sexy nightclub singer named Satin. Cobra functionary Zartan manages to activate the control cubes, setting off a chain events culminating in a dangerous encounter with killer seals on an iceberg. Written by Ron Friedman, "Three Cubes to Darkness" first aired in America on September 18, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Pyramid of Darkness, Part Two In the second episode of the five-part |Pyramid of Darkness, the G.I. Joe team leads a counteroffensive against Cobra in hopes of regaining Space Station Delta. Joe members Shipwreck and Snake-Eyes are able to steal some of the all-important control cubes and a laser weapon, leading to a near-fatal escapade in a volcano called the Devil's Playground. Meanwhile, the dreaded Dreadnoks delighting in tormenting the captured Joes who have been forced into slave labor on Delta. Written by Ron Friedman, Rendezvous in the City of the Dead first aired in America on September 17, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Operation Mind Menace Taking control of the minds of several innocent civilians, Cobra artificially expands their powers, organizing his captives into an offensive army. Among these new mind-slaves is Tommy, the brother of G.I. Joe team member Airborne. Racing to Tommy's rescue, Airborne and Flash soon find themselves in need of rescuing. Written by Martin Pasko, "Operation Mind Menace" made its American TV debut on October 15, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Funhouse Cobra makes no effort to hide the fact that it has kidnapped five of the world's top scientists. It is all part of Cobra Commander's scheme to wreak a terrible vengeance on the G.I. Joe team. Lured to a South American island, the Joes find themselves at the mercy of Cobra's booby traps in a simulated funhouse -- and never have a rollercoaster and shooting gallery seemed more sinister. Written by Steve Mitchell and Barbara Petty, "The Funhouse" first aired in the U.S. on October 1, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Cobra's Creatures This time, Cobra has gotten hold of a device called Hi-Freq, invented by one Dr. Lucifer. The device enables the villains to gain mind control over all the animals of the world. To test Hi-Freq, Cobra kidnaps G.I. Joe team members Mutt, Junkyard. and Ripcord as human guinea pigs. Meanwhile, the other Joes try to win over Dr. Lucifer by having Lady Jaye pose as the scientist's sweetheart, Dr. Attila. Written by Kimmer Ringwald, "Cobra's Creatures" made its first American TV appearance on September 30, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Jungle Trap In its efforts to harness the raw energy supplies in the center of the earth, Cobra kidnaps eminent scientist Dr. Shakoor. Forced to do Cobra's bidding, Shakoor devises the awesome Vulcan Machine. Meanwhile, the G.I. Joe team endeavors to rescue the missing scientist -- a task comparable to finding a needle in the world's largest haystack. Written by future Batman: The Animated Series maven Paul Dini, "Jungle Trap" originally aired in America on September 27, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Cobra Stops the World Cobra attempts to gain control of the world's fuel supplies so that the leaders of Earth will knuckle under to his demands. With each passing hour, Cobra utilizes his weaponry to destroy another oil tanker. The G.I. Joe teams races against the clock to track down the source of the destruction, and in the process, team members Duke and Ace find themselves imprisoned in an all-but-impenetrable jungle. Written by Steve Gerber, "Cobra Stops the World" first aired in America on September 26, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Satellite Down Breaker manages to force a G.I. Joe spy satellite stolen by Cobra to crash somewhere in the African jungle. Both the Joe and Cobra teams race into unchartered territory to recover the satellite, only to discover that the device has been adopted as a "god" by a lost tribe called the Primords. This episode contains a cute closing gag involving the Primords' reaction to that demon machine known as Television. Written by Ted Pederson, "Satellite Down" first aired in the U.S. on September 25, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Red Rocket's Glare Extensive Enterprises, a front organization for Cobra, uses a vicious gang of bikers to force the owners of the Red Rocket Drive-Thru Diners to sell out at bargain-basement prices. It is the first step in a scheme to install sophisticated anti-personnel weapons throughout the country. But Cobra has not taken into consideration the G.I. Joe team -- specifically, team member Roadblock, whose aunt and uncle own one of the beleaguered Red Rocket restaurants. Written by Mary Skrenes, "Red Rocket's Glare" originally aired in the U.S. on September 24, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Cobra Soundwaves This time, Cobra has gotten hold of an anti-aircraft gun which emits sonic waves for sinister purposes. Acting quickly, the villains threaten to use the weapon to destroy the oil resources of a Middle Eastern nation. But the G.I. Joe team has likewise swung into action, and they're not about to be "soundly" beaten by the Cobra forces. Written by Ted Pederson, "Cobra Soundwaves" originally aired in America on October 17, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Money to Burn Cobra destroys America's economy by vaporizing all of the country's money. He then takes steps to gain complete control by distributing his own personalized currency. To counteract this financial disaster, G.I. Joe team member Lady Jaye poses as Cobra's filthy-rich "client" Gloria Vonderhoss. Making its first American television appearance on October 14, 1985 (a few weeks later in some local markets), "Money to Burn" was written by Roger Slifer. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Cobra's Candidate In the midst of a heated political campaign, Cobra Commander hopes to sway voters to his handpicked candidate, Robert Harper, by casting Harper in the role of persecuted underdog. To that end, Cobra enlists the aid of a tough street gang, who stages riots which appear to be the handiwork of Harper's opponent, Whittier Greenway. The plan is foiled when a hitherto unsupsected link between the street gang and the G.I. Joe team is revealed. Written by Gordon Kent, "Cobra's Candidate" originally aired in the U.S. on October 11, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Lights! Camera! Cobra! Several of the G.I. Joe team's more contentious members are hired as technical advisors for the Hollywood epic "The G.I. Joe Story." Striving for realism, the producers have stored several authentic Joe and Cobra weapons in their prop shed, including a genuine Cobra Firebat plane. In his efforts to steal the plane, Cobra commander must rely upon the mercurial Destro and the unpredictable Dreadnoks. The story outcome is determined by the studio's crack team of special effects wizards. Written by Buzz Dixon, "Lights! Camera! Cobra!" first aired in the U.S. on October 10, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Phantom Brigade Cobra Commander uses an elderly gypsy woman to conjure up three dangerous ghosts: a Roman legionnaire, a Mongol warrior, and an American WWI flying ace. He then sends them into battle against the G.I. Joe team, secure in the knowledge that phantoms can't be killed or injured. The Joes attempt to mount a counteroffensive by appealing to the dormant patriotism of the American ghost. Written by Sharman Di Vono, "The Phantom Brigade" originally aired in America on October 9, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Synthoid Conspiracy, Part Two In the conclusion of a two-part story, Cobra has managed to cut off funding for the G.I. Joe team with the use of his Synthoids, humanlike creatures programmed to do the villains' bidding. Even worse, Joe member Duke has been replaced by his Synthoid clone. Managing to escape Cobra's clutches, Duke links up with his fellow Joes in an effort to stem the Synthoid invasion -- receiving unexpected assistance in the form of the evil Destro, who is again locked in a power struggle with his Cobra bosses. Written by Christy Marx, "The Synthoid Conspiracy, Pt. 2" first aired in America on October 8, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Synthoid Conspiracy, Part One In the first episode of a two-part story, Cobra infiltrates the committee responsible for funding the activities of the G.I. Joe team. The villains replace several key members with lookalike Synthoid, which have been programmed to bend exclusively to Cobra's will. Not only do the Joes lose their financial base, but to make matters worse, team member Duke is likewise replaced by a lookalike Synthoid. Written by Christy Marx, "The Synthoid Conspiracy, Pt. 1" first aired in America on October 7, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Haul Down the Heavens Cobra encamps itself at the North Pole, the better to use the powerful Ion Attractor to melt the polar ice cap and upset the ecological balance of the earth. To prevent this, G.I. Joe team members Flint, Lady Jaye, and Snow Job, together with a group of scientists, head to the Arctic, only to find out that the villains are more than prepared for such a counteroffensive. The episode's highlight is Lady Jaye's tone-deaf rendition of the U.S. Marine Hymn. Written by television cartoon veteran Buzz Dixon, "Haul Down the Heavens" originally aired in America on October 4, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Greenhouse Effect A non-polluting rocket fuel that causes plants to grow to enormous size is stolen by a member of the Crimson Guards. Chortling in glee, Cobra leader Destro plans to use the fuel to create an army of killer plants. The episode's climax is a bizarre, gargantuan "food fight" between the Cobras and the G.I. Joe team. Written by Gordon Kent, "The Greenhouse Effect" made its first American TV appearance on October 3, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Spell of the Siren The Baroness hatches another scheme to take over Cobra. Her first step is to harness the power of the Conch of the Siren to hypnotize the male team members of both the Cobras and the Joes. Inevitably, it is up to the female Joes -- and a few stray unaffected males who had been off base during the Siren's aural assault -- to rescue their comrades. Written by Gerry and Carla Conway, "Spell of the Siren" was first broadcast in America on October 25, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Viper is Coming Responding to what they think are cryptic challenges from Cobra, the G.I. Joe team, led by Barbecue, heads to various parts of the world, armed for battle. Only after the dust is settled do they realize that it's all a false alarm. The climax of David Carren's teleplay was obviously inspired by one of the oldest and most familiar schoolyard jokes in academic history. "The Viper Is Coming" originally aired in America on October 24, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Germ A member of the Crimson Guard steals a vial containing Bacteria X. The usual red tape delays delivery of this vial to Destro. In the meantime, the Bacteria X is accidentally mixed with a new growth serum, resulting in a huge, gelatine monstrosity. The G.I. Joe team tries to destroy this hideous new threat, only to succeeding in doubling the danger at hand. Roger Slifer's script is a sly parody of the classic horror cheapie The Blob -- and what an ending! "The Germ" originally aired in America on October 23, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Battle for the Train of Gold Stealing a cassette containing the blueprints of Fort Knox, Cobra concocts a scheme to rob the gold treasury. At the behest of the Bureau of Engraving, the G.I. Joe team works undercover and awaits Cobra's inevitable strike. Though the villains succeed in disabling the Joes' vehicles and weapons, the good guys are able to borrow several of Kentucky's best thoroughbred racing horses during the final counteroffensive. Written by David Carren, "The Battle for the Train of Gold" first aired in America on October 16, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Pyramid of Darkness, Part Four In the fourth episode of the five-part |Pyramid of Darkness, Bazooka and Alpine are rescued by martial artist Quick-Kick, who is prompted recruited into the G.I. Joe team. Continuing in their efforts to regain control of Space Station Delta from Cobra, the Joes end up in a graveyard of sunken ships called the Sea of Lost Souls. Unfortunately, the Cobra team manages to retrieve all four of the elusive control cubes, enabling them to form the all-powerful Pyramid which will give Cobra absolute control of the world -- and the means to destroy G.I. Joe once and for all. Written by Ron Friedman, "Chaos in the Sea of Lost Souls" first aired in America on September 19, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Pyramid of Darkness, Part One Two years after the introductory cartoon miniseries G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero and one year after the following miniseries G.I. Joe: The Revenge of Cobra, the daily animated G.I. Joe series proper commenced with part one of the five-episode adventure |Pyramids of Darkness. The opening chapter, "The Further Adventures of G.I. Joe," was written by Ron Friedman, and was seen in most American markets on September 16, 1985. Things get off to a rousing start as the evil organization Cobra gains control of the G.I. Joe team's Delta space station, using Delta's weapon system to attack Joe headquarters and jam all of earth's electrical devices. Crucial to the action are four control cubes, which when placed in alignment create an all-powerful Pyramid, with which Cobras hopes to rule the world. "The Further Adventures of G.I. Joe" includes such trapping as a wild chase through Enterprise City and a flock of tribble-like creatures called the Fatal Fluffies, who can turn really bad in the wrong hands. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Lasers in the Night Cobra Commander draws up plans to steal the G.I. Joe team's new laser device. The theft is not so much for power as for ego; the Commander intends to create a monument to himself on the Moon. Meanwhile, a romance develops between Quick-Kick and pretty Joe Team trainee Amber, who, predictably, ends up being used as a pawn by the villains. Written by Marv Wolfman, "Lasers in the Night" was originally telecast in America on October 22, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Gamesmaster G.I. Joe team members Lady Jaye and Flint, together with their deadly rivals Cobra Commander and the Baroness, are captured en masse by a looney named the Gamesmaster. The four enemies must join forces to stay alive during a (literal) manhunt on Gamesmaster's gadget-laden private island, which looks deceptively like a huge amusement park. Flint Dille's teleplay was obviously inspired by the classic Richard Connell short story The Most Dangerous Game. "The Gamesmaster" originally aired in the U.S. on October 21, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Where the Reptiles Roam A dude ranch in Western Texas is purchased by one of Cobra's dummy corporations. G.I. Joe team member Wild Bill and his friends now have their hands full trying to keep Cobra from gaining control of the solar energy farm next door to the ranch. When Cobra's weapons prove too powerful, Wild Bill cannily relies upon the unharnessed energy of a good old-fashioned cattle stampede. Written by Gerry and Carla Conway, "Where the Reptiles Roam" first aired in the U.S. on October 18, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Hearts and Cannons G.I. Joes Footloose and Dusty infiltrate Cobra's desert base, where captured scientist Dr. Nancy Winters is being forced to work on a powerful new Plasma Cannon Tank. Rescuing Nancy, the two Joes spend as much time vying for her affections as they do preventing Cobra from putting the Tank into operation. And what about that contentious local character named Jabal? Scripted by Alfred A. Pegel and Larry Houston from a story by Pegel, "Hearts and Cannons" was first broadcast in America on November 14, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Flint's Vacation Joe Team member Flint heads to the new housing project of Please Cove, hoping to spend some quality time with his cousin's family. He soon discovers that the project's inhabitants have been brainwashed and enslaved by Cobra -- and the dreaded Drednoks have been pressed into service as the local police force. Beth Bornstein's teleplay cleverly redefines the old sci-fi film classic Invasion of the Body Snatchers in TV-cartoon terms. "Flint's Vacation" was first telecast in America on November 13, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Primordial Plot Cobra steals a cache of petrified bones, then kidnaps cloning expert Dr. Massey. The result is a newly hatched crop of deadly dinosaurs, which even the Joes are at a loss to contain. And remember, folks, this was several years before the release of Spielberg's Jurassic Park. "Primordial Plot" was written by Donald F. Glut, one of the finest science fiction purveyors working in television. The episode originally aired in America on November 12, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Gods Below Once again, Cobra Commander is in need of quick cash to finance his world-domination scheme. To that end, the Commander lures the Joes into a treasure hunt at the newly excavated tomb of Osiris in Egypt. Things get complicated when the Joes and scientist Dr. Marsh are confronted by the evil Egyptian God Set, who sends them hurtling into the Realm of the Dead. Written by Gordon Kent, "The Gods Below" first aired in America on November 11, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Cobra CLAWs are Coming to Town Christmas is coming and the Joes take upon themselves to distribute used toys to needy children. Unfortunately, the toy supply is infiltrated by Cobra's troops, who have been shrunken to action-figure size. In this reduced state, the villains contrive to sway public sentiment against the good-guy Joes. When all is said and done, however, this episode exists primarily to introduce Hasbro's latest line of G.I. Joe toy products. Scripted by Carla and Gerry Conway from a story by Roy and Dan Thomas, "Cobra CLAWs are Coming to Town" originally aired in America on November 7, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Eau de Cobra The title of this G.I. Joe episode refers to a new brand of perfume, sweet to the smell, but devastating in its effect. The Baroness hopes to ensnare wealthy shipowner Socrates Arties by applying the perfume, which turns males into mind slaves. Alas, the ensuing passions get wildly out of control, thanks to a jealous Destro. Written by Flint Dille, "Eau de Cobra" made its first American TV appearance on November 6, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Excalibur Crash-landing in England's Lake District, Storm Shadow recovers the long-lost Sword Excalibur. This arouses the interest of Destro, who begins laying plans to seize the sword for his own use. Meanwhile, the Joes attempt to forestall future Cobra attacks on England, a task made difficult by the country's habitually unpredictable weather. Written by Dan DiStefano, "Excalibur" first aired in America on November 1, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Bazooka Saw a Sea Serpent Cobra has developed a mechanical sea serpent, which grows in size each time it devours a ship. Unfortunately, the villains lose control of the metallic monstrosity. Swallowing Cobras and Joes alike, the renegade serpent starts making a beeline for helpless New York City. Beany and Cecil this isn't! Written by Mary Skenes, "Bazooka Saw a Sea Serpent" was first telecast in America on October 31, 1985 -- perfect timing for a Halloween prank. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Cobra Quake A new technology has been developed to stop earthquakes before they begin. Cobra reverses that technology, intending to wreak havoc at a Third World Council peace conference in Japan. Assigned to guard the delegates, the Joes end up in a desperate search for Cobra's booby traps in three different, far-flung locations. Written by Ted Pederson, "Cobra Quake" made its first American TV appearance on October 28, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Pyramid of Darkness, Part Five In the concluding episode of the five-part Pyramid of Darkness, Cobra has successfully assembled the Pyramid, which will give them absolute and unquestioned power over the world. Fortunately, the G.I. Joe team manages to escape Cobra's clutches, bearing up against all manner of deadly devices, including an immobilizing heat beam. As the episode races to a conclusion, the viewer is never entirely certain who will emerge triumphant (hint: the coda finds the villains in their characteristic "It's all your fault" mode). Written by Ron Friedman, "Knotting Cobra's Coils" first aired in America on September 20, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Cold Slither The Cobra Commander makes a startling discovery: He can no longer continue his efforts to rule the world because he is flat broke. Hoping to raise money in a hurry, the Commander utilizes the "hidden persuasion" method by hiring Zartan and the Drednoks to pose as musicians, then inserts mind-control messages in the music in order to enslave the group's fans. Alas, even three Joe members fall victim to the booby-trapped tunes. Something of a self-parody, this G.I. Joe episode was written by Charles Michael Hill. Though filmed as the final episode of season one, "Cold Slither" was telecast on December 2, 1985, long before the season finale. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Traitor, Part One In the first episode of a two-part story, a desperate Dusty is coerced into selling information about the G.I. Joes' new bullet-proof chemical armor protection. The recipient of this top-secret information is Cobra, who has promised to pay the medical bills for Dusty's ailing mother. Arrested for treason, Dusty is sprung from prison by the Joes themselves, who believe that extenuating circumstance and not treachery motivated the prisoner's rash actions. But is Dusty genuinely a victim of circumstance, or a villain in disguise? Written by Buzz Dixon, part one of "The Traitor" first aired in America on November 25, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Worlds Without End, Part Two In the conclusion of the two-part "Worlds Without End," Joe team members Flint, Lady Jaye, Airtight, Grunt, Clutch, and Steeler are still trapped in a parallel Earth, still at the mercy of the conquering Cobras. The Joes receive unexpected help from their old nemesis the Baroness -- who has been reinvented as a "good guy," in love with Steeler. Adopting a divide-and-conquer approach, the Baroness and the Joes foment a Cobra civil war. When the dust settles, three of the Joes choose to remain in the parallel world to continue fighting the good fight on behalf of their new confreres. Written by Martin Pasko, part two of "Worlds Without End" first aired in America on November 5, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Captives of Cobra, Part One In the first episode of a two-part story, Cobra kidnaps the family members of the G.I. Joe team, including the parents of Quick Kick, Thunder, and Scarlett. Using mind control, the villains turn their captives against the Joes. It is all part of a scheme to steal some highly explosive crystals created by a misfire chemical reaction. First telecast in America on October 29, 1985, part one of "Captives of Cobra" was written by G.I. Joe stalwart Christy Marx. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Worlds Without End, Part One In this first episode of a two-part adventure, Joe team members Flint, Lady Jaye, Airtight, Grunt, Clutch, and Steeler try to recover a matter transmutor stolen by the Dreadnoks. When the device is accidentally triggered, the Joes are hurled into a bizarre parallel world. Upon getting their bearings, they discover that, in this particular world, the Cobras have emerged triumphant over the Joes -- and the Drednoks are now the police force. Written by Martin Pasko, part one of "Worlds Without End" first aired in America on November 4, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Captives of Cobra, Part Two In the conclusion of a two-part story, several family members of the G.I. Joe team are still being held prisoner by Cobra, who hope to use their captives to retrieve some dangerously explosive chemicals. Team member Scarlett is able to rescue some of the captives -- who, because their minds have been enslaved by Cobra, prove to be almost as dangerous as their captors. Meanwhile, the villains overreach themselves by attempting to nab the extremely self-reliant family of Joe member Gung Ho. Written by Christy Marx, part two of "Captives of Cobra" was originally telecast in America on October 30, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Grey Hair and Growing Pains Serpentor steals Madame Versailles' special formula for making people younger -- or, if used improperly, making them older. Intending to exploit the treatment for his own evil purposes, Serpentor is unwittingly helped along by the vanity of Mme. Versailles' commercial spokespersons. In the course of events, three of the Joes age 50 years, another three team members regress into childhood, and Zarina and Mainframe stage a deadly confrontation. Written by Dave Marconi and Flint Dille, "Grey Hair and Growing Pains" first aired in America on October 14, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: In the Presence of Mine Enemies Joe Team member Slip Stream finds himself stranded on a monster-infested island with a beautiful female StratoViper named Raven. At first, the two natural enemies devote their energies to wiping one another out. But Raven changes her mind when she discovers that she has been set up as a "dead duck" by her leader, the Cobra Commander. Written by Chris Weber and Karen Wilson, "In the Presence of Mine Enemies" originally aired in America on November 19, 1986, as the final second-season episode of G.I. Joe. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Sins of Our Fathers Dismissed from the Joe Team, Dial-Tone is unwittingly plunked in the middle of another power struggle between Cobra Commander and Serpentor. The action shifts to Scotland, ending up at Destro's ancestral castle. Both Joes and Cobras are forced to fight side by side when they are threatened by a horrible monster, summoned from the past. Scripted by Buzz Dixon from a story by Steve Gerber, "Sins of Our Fathers" first aired in America on November 18, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Joe's Night Out Three of the Joes -- Wet Suit, Leatherneck, and Dial-Tone -- accompany their dates to the opening of a trendy new night club. They are subsequently abducted along with all the other patrons when the "club" turns out to be a rocket in disguise, courtesy of Cobra. Hurled into deep space, the hostages will be returned only on condition that research scientist Dr. Melany assist Cobra in developing a powerful new plane engine. First broadcast in America on November 10, 1986, "Joe's Night Out" was written by David Schwartz. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Second Hand Emotions Dr. Mindbender and Serpentor develop an electronic organ capable of manipulating emotions. The villains play the organ at the wedding of LifeLine's sister, hoping thereby to force the Joe Team members into destroying themselves. Something old, something new, something borrowed, and something blue (blew up, that is). Written by Carla and Gerry Conway, "Second Hand Emotions" made its first U.S. television appearance on October 31, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Nightmare Assault The latest Cobra device for deviltry is something called the Somulator. Deploying this device, Dr. Mindbender is able to enter and alter the dreams of the Joe Team members, causing horrible nightmares which result in carelessness and a drop in morale. But the "good" doctor himself falls victim to LowLife's all-too-vivid nightmare, consisting of the combined dreams of the other Joes. Written by Marv Wolfman, "Nightmare Assault" originally aired in America on October 30, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Most Dangerous Thing in the World During General Hawk's absence, Cobra wreaks havoc upon the Joe's computer system. As a result, the troublesome Shipwreck, LifeLine, and Dial-Tone are promoted to the rank of General. Needless to say, the trio is hardly officer material, and it is up to Hawk to undo the ensuing damage -- and to save the weakened Joe force from an all-out Cobra attack. Written by Buzz Dixon, "The Most Dangerous Thing in the World" first aired in America on October 29, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: G.I. Joe and the Golden Fleece At the Suez Canal, the Cobras attempt to recover a valuable golden coil from the wreckage of a crashed UFO. They are confronted by the Joes, and in the ensuing struggle a laser beam is accidentally triggered. Within seconds, Joes and Cobras alike a hurtled back in time to ancient Greece, where they are welcomed and worshipped as gods. Scripted by Richard Merwin from a story by Flint Dille, "G.I. Joe and the Golden Fleece" first aired in the U.S. on October 27, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Ninja Holiday Attending a martial arts competition, Joe Team member Sgt. Slaughter is "chosen" by a group of sinister ninjas for a special assignment. Unwillingly submitting himself to rigorous training, Sarge discovers that he has been selected to assassinate Cobra Emperor Serpentor. During the climactic chase, the Joe team faces opposition from a variety of martial-arts experts, many of whom are dressed like Village People rejects! Written by Michael Charles Hill, "Ninja Holiday" originally aired in the U.S. on October 22, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Part Five In the concluding chapter of a five-part adventure, the worst has happened: Dr. Mindbender has successfully melded the DNA of several past conquerors into a single, super-powered Cobra Emperor named Serpentor. Fortunately, Sgt. Slaughter and the rest of the G.I. Joe team manage to escape their Cobra captors and to mount a counteroffensive. Without giving away the ending, it can be noted that enough Joe and Cobra members are left standing to populate the subsequent episodes of G.I. Joe's second TV season. Written by Buzz Dixon, "Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Pt. 5" first aired in America on September 19, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Part Four In the fourth chapter of a five-part adventure, Cobra has successfully captured several members of the new G.I. Joe team. Dr. Mindbender is now certain that he can continue his plans to create a powerful Cobra Emperor named Serpentor unimpeded. Altering his scheme a bit, Mindbender is now determined to use Sgt. Slaughter's DNA in the creation process. Written by Buzz Dixon, "Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Pt. 4" first aired in America on September 18, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Part Three In the third chapter of a five-part adventure, the Joes run into danger in all corners of the world. Beach Head and Mainframe encounter trouble at Dracula's castles; Duke is jeopardized at Genghis Khan's tomb; Shipwreck is nearly scuttled at Alexander the Great's underwater crypt; and Sgt. Slaughter is captured near Sun Tzu's burial mound. On the "plus" side, the Joes finally discover that Cobra intends to use the DNA from past conquerors to create an omnipotent Cobra Emperor named Serpentor. Written by Buzz Dixon, "Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Pt. 3" first aired in America on September 17, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Part Two In the second chapter of a five-part adventure, the new G.I. Joe team scurries all over the world, trying to prevent Cobra from raiding the sacred resting places of such past leaders as Napoleon, Alexander the Great, and Ivan the Terrible. The heroes run into a great deal of interference, not only from Cobra but also from local politicians and bureaucrats. Meanwhile, Dr. Mindbender begins the process of assembling the new, all-powerful Cobra Emperor Serpentor. Written by Buzz Dixon, "Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Pt. 2" first aired in America on September 16, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Part One Season two of G.I. Joe was launched in America on September 15, 1986, with the first episode of the five-part adventure |Arise, Serpentor, Arise. Fed up with Cobra Commander's bungling, Dr. Mindbender decides to create a new, all-powerful Cobra Emperor, using the DNA of such past conquerers as Napoleon, Genghis Khan, Alexander the Great, Ivan the Terrible, and Sun Tzu. It is up to the brand-new G.I. Joe team to stop Mindbender in his tracks, but first, they have to figure out exactly what he is up to. "Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Pt. 1" was written by Buzz Dixon. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Spy That Rooked Me Also known as "The Spy Who Rooked Me," this episode focuses on a world-famous, Bond-like secret agent named Matthew Burke. After rescuing Joe team members Flint, Lady Jaye, Dial-Tone, and Cross-Country, Burke agrees to help them deliver some deadly nerve gas -- and, incidentally, to elude the diabolical Dr. Mindbender. Alas, Burke is so wrapped up in his own mistake that he nearly messes up the mission. Written with tongue firmly in cheek by Susan K. Williams, "The Spy That Rooked Me" originally aired in America on October 13, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Glamour Girls Desperately desiring eternal youth, Madame Veil relies upon the sinister resourcefulness of Cobra. The villains kidnap dozens of beautiful fashion models, intending to tap their youthfulness on behalf of Mme. Veil. The Joes go to the rescue, receiving unexpected help from one of the abducted models: Lowlight's own sister Una. Beth Bornstein's teleplay is more than a little beholden to the Georges Franju horror film Eyes Without a Face, especially near the end of the story. "Glamour Girls" made its American TV debut on October 8, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Cobrathon Cobra is in dire need of an expensive computer virus designed to cripple the records of law enforcement agencies throughout the world. But rather than pay for the device in the normal fashion, the villains choose to put on a pay-per-view telethon, staged in a hellish casino. In this perverse twist on the Jerry Lewis oeuvre, the telethon's "entertainment" includes the ritual torture of Joe members Sci-Fi and Lifeline. Written by Martin Pasko and Rebecca Parr, "Cobrathon" first aired in America on October 6, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Sink the Montana The unexpected catalyst for this episode is Admiral George Lattimer of the U.S. Navy. Unwilling to allow his beloved USS Montana to be scrapped, the admiral joins force with Cobra's Destro turns against the United States. The Joes must prevent Lattimer from using his obsolete but still-deadly battleship from destroying the entire Atlantic Fleet. Written by David Carren, "Sink the Montana" first aired in America on September 29, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Raise the Flagg! The Joes and the Cobras race against other to salvage the remains of the sunken aircraft carrier U.S.S. Flagg. The Joes get to the wreckage first, only to discover it is inhabited by a demented Cobra chef. In addition to deadly gastronomic efforts, the Joes must also contend with some BATs and an antimatter energy pod. Written by David Carren, "Raise the Flagg!" made its first American TV appearance on October 20, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: My Brother's Keeper Wheelchair-bound physicist Jeremy Penser allows himself to be duped by Cobra. In exchange for regaining the use of his legs, Dr. Penser agrees to help develop Cobra's latest weapon of destruction. So blindsided does Penser become that he nearly seals the doom of his own younger brother Timothy -- not to mention practically every member of the G.I. Joe team. Written by Buzz Dixon, "My Brother's Keeper" originally aired in America on October 15, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Iceberg Goes South Joe Team member Iceberg visits his girlfriend, Mahia, at her uncle's "Tropodome," a tropical biodome. Little does he suspect that Cobra's Dr. Mindbender is using the building as headquarters for his latest batch of diabolical genetic experiments. By the time the rest of the Joes show up, Iceberg has been converted into a hideous mutant. Written by Mary Skrenes, "Iceberg Goes South" first aired in America on October 9, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Rotten Egg Invited to be the guest of honor at a military academy, Leatherneck discovers that the institution is under the command of Cobra. Worse still, the head of the academy is a fugitive criminal named McCann -- who, as a raw Marine grunt, had been trained by Leatherneck at Parris Island. Seeking revenge for being booted from the service, Leatherneck is determined to use his own military strategy to destroy his former mentor. Written by Steve Mitchell and Barbara Petty, "The Rotten Egg" originally aired in America on October 7, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Million Dollar Medic LifeLine rescues Bree Van Mark, daughter of a wealthy industrialist, from a watery grave. To show her gratitude, Bree showers the reluctant LifeLine with expensive gifts -- including a gold-plated helicopter. Inevitably, the girl becomes a pawn in the latest Cobra scheme. Celebrated cartoon voice-over director Susan Blu is heard as Bree. Written by Carla and Gerry Conway, "Million Dollar Medic" first aired in America on October 2, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Once Upon a Joe... During a pitched battle between the Cobras and the Joes, an orphanage is accidentally destroyed, though the children emerge unscathed. As a new building is constructed, Shipwreck tries to keep the kids entertained, all the while endeavoring to prevent Zartan from recovering a lost Cobra weapon, the mysterious McGuffin Device (scriptwriter Buzz Dixon certainly knows his Hitchcock). The plot is partially resolved by orphan girl Jenny, who in many respects is quicker on the uptake than the Joes. "Once Upon a Joe..." originally aired in the U.S. on October 1, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Let's Play Soldier In Bangkok, Leatherneck takes charge of four "dust children," street orphans fathered by American GIs. Meanwhile, Cobra tries to enslave the population of Thailand by distributing chewing gum laced with Dr. Mindbender's latest mind-paralysis drug. As if that wasn't enough of a complication, the duplicitous Zarana leads the G.I. Joe team into another trap. Written by Sharman Di Vono, "Let's Play Soldier" first aired in the U.S. on September 30, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Computer Complications Cobra operative Zarana breaks into Joe headquarters, there to steal an antimatter deposit. Her plans are altered when she meets and falls in love with Joe team member Mainframes. Orders are orders, and Zarana has been ordered to kill Mainframe. David Schwartz's teleplay is chock-full of clever and unexpected plot twists. "Computer Complications" was first telecast in America on September 26, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Last Hour to Doomsday Cobra's latest weapon is the Vortex Cone, which plays havoc with the ocean's magnetic currents to cause huge tidal waves all over the world. Thus armed, the Cobra leader threatens to wipe out the entire East Coast if his demands are not meant. In their efforts to foil the villains, the Joe Teams deploys such strategies as having Lady Jaye impersonate the Baroness. Written by Tom Degenais, "Last Hour to Doomsday" originally aired in America on September 25, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: My Favorite Things Serpentor leads a band of Cobras in stealing the historical relics which, when assembled, form the DNA for Serpentor's personality matrix. The villains' problem: They must wrest these relics away from the even nastier despots who currently possess them. Meanwhile, Joe team member Wet-Suit learns a valuable lesson about self-control -- and nearly meets disaster in the castle of the original Count Dracula. Written by Doug Booth, "My Favorite Things" originally aired in America on October 16, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Into Your Tent I Will Silently Creep Joe team member Cross Country stumbles upon a Cobra slave labor camp. The captives are toiling on behalf of Cobra Commander, who needs enough money to thwart Serpentor's latest power play. The story's "maguffin" is a missing computer disk, over which a lot of fuss is stirred. Some good "mutant" character design and animation distinguishes this episode, which was written by Buzz Dixon and Michael Charles Hill. "Into Your Tent I Will Silently Creep" was the final episode of G.I. Joe, though not the final one to be telecast: Its original American air date was November 20, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Not a Ghost of a Chance Three Cobra members go on Hector Ramirez's TV show "Twenty Questions," ostensibly to clear themselves of charges that he destroyed the prototype for a new stealth bomber. Meanwhile, the Joes try to rescue the bombers' missing pilots. Their efforts -- and the ultimate unmasking of Cobra as the scoundrels that they really are -- is almost undermined by Joe team member Flint's personal demons. Written by Sharmon Di Vono, "Not a Ghost of a Chance" was first telecast in America on November 13, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide
  • Untouchables: Season 3, Vol. 2

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Nov 10, 2009

    Includes:The Untouchables: The Monkey Wrench (1962) The Untouchables: The Case Against Elliot Ness (1962) The Untouchables: Man in the Middle (1962) The Untouchables: Takeover (1962) The Untouchables: The Stryker Brothers (1962) The Untouchables: Element of Danger (1962) The Untouchables: The Maggie Storm Story (1962) The Untouchables: Downfall (1962) The Untouchables: The Ginnie Littlesmith Story (1962) The Untouchables: Arsenal (1962) The Untouchables: Pressure (1962) The Untouchables: The Contract (1962) The Untouchables: The Monkey Wrench To improve the taste of his beer, Frank Nitti (Bruce Gordon) brings several expert German "braumeisters" into the country. This doesn't rest well with Nitti's rival Joe Kulak (Oscar Beregi), whose own revenue from bootleg beer takes a big hit. Caught in the crossfire are the hapless brewers, several of whom end up at the wrong end of a tommy-gun. To end the bloodshed, Elliot Ness (Robert Stack) is forced into an uneasy alliance with mob widow Mady (Dolores Dorn), who has been renting her country home to the German "visitors"--and whose loyalties are, to say the least, somewhat in doubt. Warren Kemmerling takes over from both Lawrence Dobkin and Robert J. Wilke as Dutch Schultz in this final episode of The Untouchables' third season. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Untouchables: The Case Against Elliot Ness With the 1933 Chicago World's Fair opening in a few days, the three Endicott brothers manage to secure several franchises on the fairgrounds. But not for long: the Endicotts are murdered, and gangsters are put in their place. It's all the handiwork of Mitchell Grandin (Pat Hingle), a wealthy and highly respected member of Chicago's social elite who carries on a secret life as a racketeer. In his efforts to get the goods on Grandin, Elliot Ness (Robert Stack) is tricked into publicly charging the man with the murder of two-bit thug Dolph Cagle (Cliff Carnell), leaving Ness wide open for a costly slander suit. But for all his cleverness, Grandin hadn't counted on the intervention of a certain Frank Nitti (Bruce Gordon)--to say nothing of Dolph Cagle's "widow" Fran (Jeanne Cooper). ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Untouchables: Man in the Middle Martin Balsam essays the title role in this episode as nightclub owner Benjy Leemer. Caught in the middle of a turf war between slot-machine "czar" Joe Bohman (Tom Drake) and gambler Porker Davis (Gavin MacLeod), Leemer ends up with his business burned to the ground and his songstress wife Julie (Cloris Leachman) out of a job. Amidst several symbolic scenes with a pair of "tame" rats, Benjy quietly plots vengeance against both Bohman and Davis--while Julie appears to cross over to the enemy by becoming Bohman's main squeeze. Fans of The Mary Tyler Moore Show will be impressed by the noncomic performances of that series' "Murray" and "Phyllis"...even though Gavin MacLeod and Cloris Leachman never appear together in the same scene.. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Untouchables: Takeover Three weeks prior to the repeal of Prohibition, Woody O'Mara (Mort Mills) prepares to eliminate brewery operator Franz Koenig (played by Hogan's Heroes' future "Sgt. Schultz" John Banner) so that he and Charlie Zenko (Luther Adler) can take over all illegal liquor activities on the North Side before it's too late. Zenko shows his "gratitude" by planting a bomb in O'Mara's car and assuming command of the entire operation himself. Ironically, Zenko himself ends up being betrayed by his own son Larry (Robert Loggia)--leaving Elliot Ness (Robert Stack) to solemnly pick up the pieces. Watch for Leonard Nimoy as a squirrelly trigger man named Packy. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Untouchables: The Stryker Brothers No sooner have they been released from prison than the four Stryker brothers pick up where they left off, assuming control of a string of night clubs and all illegal traffic within. In dire need of extra money to keep their operation afloat, the brothers plan to rob a mail shipment--and to this end, they coax a professional arsonist named Jaeger (Nehemiah Persoff in a less villainous role than usual) out of retirement. Only when the Strykers renege on their promise to pay Jaeger the 20 grand they promised him does the scheme unravel, allowing Elliot Ness (Robert Stack) to mete out justice. Frank Sutton, aka Gomer Pyle USMC's Sergeant Carter, makes the first of four Untouchables appearances, here cast as the youngest and most timorous of the Stryker brothers. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Untouchables: Element of Danger In his second Untouchables appearance, Lee Marvin is disturbingly convincing as Victor Rate, a brilliant psychopath in cahoots with narcotics kingpin Arnold Stegler (Victor Jory). A cool customer who gets his kicks by deliberately placing himself in dangerous situations, Rate has no qualms about gunning down a government agent in broad daylight, then loading 50,000 pounds of opium onto a truck while the terrified witnesses look on in amazement. To bring this human monster to justice, Elliot Ness (Robert Stack) employs the services of a movie cameraman, a professional lipreader...and Arnold Stegler, who in a futile effort to get himself off the hook ends up signing his own death warrant. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Untouchables: The Maggie Storm Story One year before her Oscar-winning performance in Hud, Patricia Neal guest-starred in this Untouchables episode as torch singer Maggie Storm (and never mind that we never hear her sing a note at any time). Maggie is the featured entertainer at the 808 Club, a night spot mentioned by dying drug peddler Benny Rivas (Herman Rudin) after a shootout with the Untouchables. Following this clue, Elliot Ness (Robert Stack) pays a visit to the club, thereby renewing an old acquaintance with Maggie (they'd been "friendly enemies" during Probibition). Ness would like to believe that Maggie isn't involved in the blatant drug trafficking that goes on at the club, but the evidence is stacked against her. Even so, she isn't the real villain of the piece: that honor is reserved for an unsavory character named Vince Shyre (Vic Morrow). Joseph Ruskin makes his first series appearance as the infamous Louis "Lepke" Buchalter. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Untouchables: Downfall This episode is set in the late 1920s, explaining why Federal agent Elliot Ness (Robert Stack) appears to still be a bachelor. Bootlegger Pete "The Persuader" Kalminski has been encountering a lot of trouble getting his shipments past Ness and the Untouchables. Enter Joey December (Steven Hill), a second-generation railroad owner facing bankruptcy. For a piece of the action, Joey offers to tranport the liquor right under the Feds' noses on his railroad cars. It seems like the perfect set-up--until Joey commits the fatal error of trying to shake down Kalminski for additional money, using as leverage the written "deathbed confession" of one of Al Capone's boys. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Untouchables: The Ginnie Littlesmith Story When her gangster uncle is gunned down in the soup kitchen where "Untouchable" Rossi (Nick Georgiade) is working undercover, mild-mannered Ginnie Littlesmith (Phyllis Love) falls heir to her uncle's record books, which chronicle all illegal activities of a criminal organization known as The Group. Though Elliot Ness (Robert Stack) would dearly love to get his hands on those books, Ginnie intends to keep them in her possession, the better to extract $100,000 from her uncle's former associates. What Ginnie doesn't know is that she is being set up for betrayal by her own boyfriend (Don Gordon). ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Untouchables: Arsenal Once again, Frank Nitti (Bruce Gordon) crosses swords with rival gangster Bugs Moran (previously played by Lloyd Nolan, here enacted by Robert J. Wilke). To avoid an all-out gang war, Elliot Ness (Robert Stack) begin confiscating all the machine guns owned by the two mobsters' torpedoes. To keep himself armed, Nitti makes a deal for a dozen Tommy guns with Polish gunsmith Jan Tobek (Kevin Hagen). Trouble is, once Nitti and Moran agree to call off the war, both Tobek and his wife Eva (Salome Jens) will be eminently expendable. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Untouchables: Pressure Drug kingpin Louie Madikoff (Harold J. Stone) ends up half a million dollars in the red when several of his dope shipments are intercepted by Elliot Ness (Robert Stack). In desperation, Louie warns Ness that if any more of his deliveries are stopped, he'll blow up a school full of children--and brings in professional "torch" Artie Krebs (Warren Oates) in case he has to carry out his threat. Meanwhile, a Romeo-and-Juliet romance between Madikoff's son Danny (Darryl Hickman) and Francey Pavanos (Collin Wilcox), the daughter of Louie's hated rival Mike Pavanos (Booth Colman), may well prove fatal for all concerned. With this episode, Robert Carricart returns to the role of Lucky Luciano. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Untouchables: The Contract Knowing that syndicate errand boy Smiley Barris (Frank Sutton) has enough information to send him to the chair, Joe Kulak (Oscar Beregi) orders his hired torpedoes to bump Smiley off. When his plans are thwarted by Elliot Ness (Robert Stack), Kulak brings in an out-of-town assassin named John Quist (John Larkin). Now on the lam from both Ness and Quist, Smiley seeks protection from high-rolling gambler Johnny Templar (a "Bugsy Siegel" clone played by Harry Guardino). Both Johnny and his girlfriend Jeanne (Gloria Talbott) take a liking to Smiley and do everything they can to help him--which turns out to be a fatal miscalculation. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide
  • Rome: The Complete Series

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Nov 17, 2009

    Includes:Rome: The Stolen Eagle (2005) Rome: Stealing From Saturn (2005) Rome: How Titus Pullo Brought Down the Republic (2005) Rome: The Ram Has Touched the Wall (2005) Rome: The Kalends of February (2005) Rome: The Spoils (2005) Rome: Triumph (2005) Rome: Utica (2005) Rome: Caesarion (2005) Rome: Pharsalus (2005) Rome: Egeria (2005) Rome: An Owl in a Thornbush (2005) Rome: Passover (2007) Rome: Son of Hades (2007) Rome: These Being the Words of Marcus Tullius Cicero (2007) Rome: Death Mask (2007) Rome: Deus Impeditio Esuritori Nullus (2007) Rome: De Patre Vostro (2007) Rome: A Necessary Fiction (2007) Rome: Philippi (2007) Rome: Heroes of the Republic (2007) Rome: Testudo et Lepus (The Tortoise and the Hare) (2007) Rome: The Stolen Eagle As HBO's Rome opens, Gaius Julius Caesar (Ciarán Hinds) is reaching the end of his war against Gaul, and his popularity in the republic has reached a new high, arousing the concern of Pompey Magnus (Kenneth Cranham) and others in the senate that he will attempt to seize power. During the ultimate battle, a Centurion, Lucius Vorenus (Kevin McKidd), upbraids one of his men, Titus Pullo (Ray Stevenson), for breaking ranks. Pullo is later flogged and jailed for his disobedience, and misses out on some sacking. Caesar gets word that his daughter, married to Pompey, has died during childbirth. Both Pompey and Caesar see this as a further threat to their longstanding alliance. Caesar sends word to his conniving niece, Atia (Polly Walker) to offer Pompey a new bride on Caesar's behalf. Atia chooses her own daughter, Octavia (Kerry Condon), despite the fact that Octavia is already happily married. Atia convinces her to divorce, and offer herself to Pompey. Meanwhile, in Gaul, Caesar's standard, a golden eagle, is stolen, and he tasks Mark Antony (James Purefoy) with its recovery. Caesar also manipulates his young friend, Brutus (Tobias Menzies), the son of Servilia (Lindsay Duncan), his erstwhile lover, to report back to Rome that the eagle's been stolen, so that his enemies there will think Caesar is weak. Atia sends her son, young Octavian (Max Pirkis), to Gaul to deliver a white horse to Caesar, before the great man arrives back in Rome and everyone is giving him gifts. Octavian's party is assaulted, the horse stolen, and the boy abducted. Vorenus, assigned by Antony to the seemingly futile task of tracking down Caesar's standard, selects Pullo to assist him. The two have a stroke of amazing luck when they come across the party that captured Octavian. ~ Josh Ralske, All Movie Guide Rome: Stealing From Saturn Pompey (Kenneth Cranham) and the senators who fled Rome get dreadful news about their war chest, and Pompey sends his son Quintus (Rick Warden) out to find the scouts who found the gold. Back in Rome, Caesar (Ciarán Hinds) is short on funds, and has instituted martial law in order to keep the peace. Atia (Polly Walker) is holding a dinner in his honor, and is unhappy to see Servilia (Lindsay Duncan) on Caesar's guest list. Vorenus (Kevin McKidd) prepares an expensive feast in honor of the god Janus to inaugurate his merchant business. He rejects Mark Antony's (James Purefoy) generous offer to make him a prefect, preferring civilian life to participation in Caesar's campaign, which Vorenus sees as blasphemous. But things get rocky at the feast when his sister-in-law, Lyde (Esther Hall), arrives with her husband, Evander (Enzo Cilenti). Lyde, jealous over her husband's apparent continued passion for Niobe (Indira Varma), gets drunk and makes an embarrassing scene. At Atia's dinner, Caesar, who has asked for an augury at Jupiter's temple, to show Rome's citizen's that the gods favor his actions, takes the opportunity to offer the chief augur (Roger Hammond) a bribe in the guise of a late birthday gift for his wife. Back at Vorenus' home, things get worse after the party when Quintus shows up with some men, threatening Vorenus and Niobe and demanding to know where the stolen gold is. Vorenus has no idea what he's talking about until Pullo (Ray Stevenson) arrives, throwing money around, and the two get the better of Quintus. Vorenus finds out about the cart full of gold and orders Pullo to deliver it to Caesar. Caesar, meanwhile, sends Pompey and the Senate an offer of truce. ~ Josh Ralske, All Movie Guide Rome: How Titus Pullo Brought Down the Republic Caesar (Ciarán Hinds) sends the gruff Mark Antony (James Purefoy), back to Rome to serve as People's Tribune. Vorenus (Kevin McKidd) and Pullo (Ray Stevenson) accompany him, and are charged with returning Octavian (Max Pirkis) to his mother, Atia (Polly Walker). Invited to dine at Atia's home, Vorenus expresses his strong belief in the divinity of the Republic, while, prompted by Octavian's astute appraisal of Caesar's mindset and the state of the empire, Titus proclaims that he would follow Caesar if he rebelled against the Republic. Vorenus returns home to his wife, Niobe (Indira Varma), whom he has not seen in more than eight years. He finds her cradling an infant, and immediately assumes the worst. She tells him that the baby is his grandson by his eldest daughter, who is now 13. Pullo spends his first day in Rome whoring and gambling, and runs into some trouble deep in Pompeian territory. Pullo murders a man who cheats him at dice and is critically injured in the ensuing melee. He makes his way to Vorenus' home, and Vorenus brings in a doctor who performs a gruesome operation on Pullo's skull. As he recovers, Niobe confides in Pullo, telling him how much she's missed her husband, but bemoaning the lack of affection Vorenus has shown his family since his return. Antony meets with Pompey (Kenneth Cranham) and members of the Senate at Atia's house, and insults them with Caesar's demands, according to the general's plans. Pompey decides to issue an ultimatum to Caesar in the Senate, and enlists the reluctant Cicero (David Bamber) in his cause. Caesar is ordered to surrender or be declared an enemy of the Republic. The senators are counting on Antony's veto, but pandemonium erupts before Antony can say his piece. Caesar decides to march on Rome. ~ Josh Ralske, All Movie Guide Rome: The Ram Has Touched the Wall Pompey (Kenneth Cranham) and the senators send word to Caesar (Ciarán Hinds), disappointing him by accepting his offer of truce. But Caesar decides that Pompey's vain refusal to meet with him face-to-face is excuse enough to reject the truce. Mark Antony (James Purefoy) is pleased, and ready to go after Pompey, but he soon realizes that Caesar is biding his time. Antony suggests to his lover, Atia (Polly Walker), that Caesar won't go after Pompey because he refuses to leave Servilia (Lindsay Duncan) again. This spurs the jealous Atia to find an anonymous way to humiliate Caesar into breaking off his affair. Vorenus (Kevin McKidd), meanwhile, learns that nearly all of his slaves have fallen ill and died on the way from Gaul. With his nascent merchant business already in ruins, Vorenus is forced to work as a bodyguard, which he quickly learns is not for him. Desperate, he turns to Antony, hoping to rejoin the 13th Legion as a prefect and a member of the Evocati. Meanwhile, Atia has hired Pullo (Ray Stevenson) to teach Octavian (Max Pirkis) the "masculine arts," but Octavian admits that he was not cut out for fighting. "It's not the killing," he explains. "It's the waving about of swords I find tedious." Impressed with Octavian's intellect, Pullo asks him for advice. He suspects that Niobe (Indira Varma) has been unfaithful to his comrade Vorenus, but he has no proof. Octavian recommends that Pullo hold his tongue until he's certain, and the two kidnap Evander (Enzo Cilenti) in hopes of forcing him to confess. ~ Josh Ralske, All Movie Guide Rome: The Kalends of February As the first season of Rome draws to a close, Vorenus (Kevin McKidd) and Pullo (Ray Stevenson) learn that they are heroes on the streets of the city, "symbols of brotherly love and redemption." On a trip to consecrate the land he and his wife have been given, Vorenus tells Niobe (Indira Varma) that Caesar (Ciarán Hinds) might exile him for disobeying his orders by helping Pullo. But Caesar later explains that it's politically unfeasible to punish the heroes, and if he does nothing, he'll appear weak, so, as part of a larger plan to incorporate (loyal) "plebs" and foreign citizens into the Senate, he makes Vorenus a senator. Of course, Caesar's ulterior motive is to have the "ferocious" Vorenus at his side so that no one will try to kill him. Pullo, near death, still manages to make his way from his sick bed, eager to reap the bounty of his newfound celebrity. Instead, he ends up collapsing at Vorenus' home, where Niobe assigns his care to Eirene (Chiara Mastalli), who contemplates murder. With Vorenus joined to Caesar on the Senate floor, the growing group of conspirators fears they will not have the opportunity to kill Caesar. While some would be content to poison him, or murder him in his bed, Brutus (Tobias Menzies) insists that the deed "must be done honorably." Then Servilia (Lindsay Duncan) realizes where she's heard Vorenus' name before, and sets a plot in motion to separate the hero from the dictator at the pivotal moment. While the plot is unfolding, Servilia invites Atia (Polly Walker) and Octavian (Max Pirkis) to her home, and tells them of her further plans for vengeance. ~ Josh Ralske, All Movie Guide Rome: The Spoils A fellow veteran, Mascius (Michael Nardone) approaches Vorenus (Kevin McKidd), now a magistrate, about severance for the 13th Legion. They are supposed to be receiving land. Vorenus asks Caesar (Ciarán Hinds) to act. Caesar, unwilling to give the veterans land in Italy, offers land in Pelonia. Told that this won't be acceptable, and eager to keep the former soldiers on his side, Caesar discreetly suggests that Vorenus bribe Mascius to persuade his comrades to accept the offer. Mascius reluctantly agrees. Caesar also invites Vorenus and Niobe (Indira Varma) to a dinner at Atia's (Polly Walker) home. When Vorenus responds nervously, Caesar tells him, "You shall get used to good society." The walls of Rome are filled with graffiti depicting Brutus (Tobias Menzies) murdering Caesar, and Cassius (Guy Henry) tries to convince Brutus to claim his family's legacy of fighting tyranny. Brutus initially refuses to betray his friend, but has second thoughts when Caesar, well aware of whispers and the power of Brutus' family name, suggests that Brutus rule over far-off Macedonia. Pullo (Ray Stevenson), now miserable and friendless, has found work as an assassin, but his lack of discretion gets him arrested for murder. At Atia's dinner, Octavian (Max Pirkis) suggests that Vorenus or Caesar himself do something to save Pullo, but Caesar points out the political implications such action would cause. Octavian acts on his own, sending Timon (Lee Boardman) to find Pullo a lawyer, but at Pullo's public trial, the crowd demands the brazen killer's head, and Pullo is sentenced to death in the arena. ~ Josh Ralske, All Movie Guide Rome: Triumph In the Senate, Cicero (David Bamber), feeling that he has no choice, calls for Caesar (Ciarán Hinds) to be made emperor. Brutus (Tobias Menzies), also under tremendous pressure, speaks passionately in favor of the motion, and it passes unanimously. Caesar exhorts the senators, "Join with me in building a new Rome, that offers justice, peace, and land to all its citizens." Posca (Nicholas Woodeson), Caesar's slave, coaches Vorenus (Kevin McKidd) as he campaigns to be magistrate of the Aventine district. When Vorenus grows weary of studying laws and such, and wonders if they should wait and see if he's elected first, Posca lets him know that his opponents in the election are "straw men." Pullo (Ray Stevenson) wants to march in Caesar's Triumph, but is told that he can't because he's no longer a soldier. At a loss, he impulsively decides to free Eirene (Chiara Mastalli) so that he can marry her and move to the country. Vorenus agrees to help him, but his plans go badly off-course. An innocent man is murdered in a moment of passion, and a severe rift develops between Pullo and Vorenus. Octavia (Kerry Condon) has run away and sought shelter with a religious order, but Octavian (Max Pirkis) goes to retrieve her in time for the Triumph. Octavia still believes (and rightly) that Atia (Polly Walker) was responsible for Glabius' death. Servilia (Lindsay Duncan) gains a new ally against Caesar when Quintus (Rick Warden) arrives on her doorstep, looking for Brutus. With help from Quintus and Cassius (Guy Henry), Servilia composes a screed against Caesar's tyranny, to which she puts Brutus' name. ~ Josh Ralske, All Movie Guide Rome: Utica Cato (Karl Johnson) and Scipio (Paul Jesson) have just suffered a devastating defeat at the Battle of Thapsus in Africa. They retreat to Utica, where Cato quietly commits suicide. After the funeral ceremony, Scipio has a soldier take his life as well. Caesar (Ciarán Hinds) returns home and begins preparing a celebration of his triumph. Vorenus (Kevin McKidd) and Pullo (Ray Stevenson) retire from soldiering. On his return, Pullo is delighted to find that the slave girl he rescued, Eirene (Chiara Mastalli), now speaks his language. Soon, at a loss for how to earn a living, the two former soldiers join Niobe (Indira Varma) and her sister in the butcher business. Vorenus breaks up a confrontation in the street, and a ruffian mocks his military service to Rome, for which he gets slapped. The thug makes it known that he works for Erastes (Lorcan Cranitch), who runs the neighborhood, and makes quick work of his enemies. (Erastes is the man for whom Vorenus briefly and unhappily worked as a bodyguard.) Erastes later goes to Vorenus' home and threatens to rape and kill his wife and daughters if Vorenus does not publicly apologize and kiss his feet. Vorenus and Pullo send the children away and prepare for a fight, but Caesar arrives before Erastes can get there, and asks Vorenus to run for the local magistrate position. Meanwhile, bent on revenge against Atia (Polly Walker) and Caesar, Servilia (Lindsay Duncan) tells Octavia (Kerry Condon) that Atia had Glabius killed, and convinces her to seduce her own brother, Octavian (Max Pirkis), in order to get information about Caesar's mysterious affliction. ~ Josh Ralske, All Movie Guide Rome: Caesarion Caesar (Ciarán Hinds) goes to Egypt, and goes to the court of the boy king, Ptolemy XIII (Shaka Bunsie), to demand that he turn over Pompey. Instead, Pompey's head is produced, and Caesar is not grateful, but enraged. He in turn demands that Ptolemy turn over the man who killed Pompey. The Egyptians have their own political strife, with Ptolemy's sister, Cleopatra (Lyndsey Marshal), having claimed the throne. Caesar decides to stay in Egypt and mediate the dispute in order to insure Egypt's grain supply to Rome isn't affected. But he sends Mark Antony (James Purefoy) and most of his men back to Rome. Vorenus (Kevin McKidd) and Pullo (Ray Stevenson) are sent to find Cleopatra, before Ptolemy's advisors have her killed. They rescue her, and she immediately plans to seduce Caesar, but on the road back to Alexandria, Cleopatra decides that since she is "between the tides" she must conceive a child immediately, before she reaches Caesar, and pass the child off as Caesar's own. She makes a surprising choice for the father. Upon returning to Alexandria, Cleopatra and Caesar have Ptolemy's advisors executed, which causes a massive public uproar, and Caesar ends up under siege in Alexandria for many months. Back in Rome, Brutus (Tobias Menzies) receives a cold welcome from Servilia (Lindsay Duncan) due to his capitulation. Antony keeps a sharp eye on Brutus and Cicero (David Bamber) while Caesar is away. ~ Josh Ralske, All Movie Guide Rome: Pharsalus This episode of Rome examines the events surrounding the historic battle of Pharsalus. Things look grim for Caesar (Ciarán Hinds) by the time Mark Antony (James Purefoy) joins him in Greece, and to make matters worse, he's lost thousands of men at sea in the journey over. Pompey (Kenneth Cranham) is prepared to wait Caesar out, but Cato (Karl Johnson) and the other senators urge him to crush Caesar, once and for all. He masses his troops for battle. Caesar is massively outnumbered, but he knows his men will put up a fight. "We must fight or die," he tells Antony. "Pompey's men have other options." Back in Rome, a worried Atia (Polly Walker) sends Octavia (Kerry Condon) to Servilia (Lindsay Duncan) again, this time to request some men to guard her home. Servilia graciously agrees, but later gets word of Caesar's startling victory on the battlefield. Uncertain as to the fate of her son, Brutus (Tobias Menzies), Servilia breaks down, and is comforted by Octavia, but the two soon find themselves in a more intimate embrace. The disgraced Pompey suggests his confederates flee to Egypt, where he has friends. Cato and Scipio (Paul Jesson) decide to leave on their own, while Brutus and Cicero (David Bamber) decide to surrender to Caesar. Pompey is left alone with his family, a few slaves and soldiers, and some Greek mercenaries. Meanwhile, Vorenus (Kevin McKidd) and Pullo (Ray Stevenson) survive a shipwreck, and find themselves alone on a desert island with no food or water. Eventually, Vorenus gets the idea to make a raft from the corpses that washed up on the island with them. They make their way to the mainland, and happen to wash up onshore just as Pompey's party reaches the coast. ~ Josh Ralske, All Movie Guide Rome: Egeria Mark Antony (James Purefoy) is running things in Rome while Caesar (Ciarán Hinds) chases down Pompey (Kenneth Cranham) and his allies in Greece. But soon, word reaches Antony that the battle has turned against Caesar, who orders Antony and whatever troops he can muster to join him in Greece in what seems a hopeless cause. Pompey sends a messenger to Antony (living in Pompey's house) to let him know that Pompey will reward him if he sits out the battle, while Atia (Polly Walker) tries to convince Antony to marry her and seize power in Rome. Antony bides his time reaching a decision. Meanwhile, Vorenus (Kevin McKidd) is having problems at home. Lyde (Esther Hall), Niobe's (Indira Varma) sister, is worried over her missing husband, and has moved in with the couple. Niobe seems more concerned about her well-being than the state of her marriage. After listening to the frustrated, lovelorn, drunken Vorenus complaining through the night, Pullo (Ray Stevenson) tells Lyde that he's heard that her husband was murdered, and pointedly tells her, in front of Niobe, to get on with her life. Pullo, assigned with schooling Octavian (Max Pirkis) in the "manly arts," takes the young man to an upscale brothel. Atia, concerned that she'll be on the losing side of the battles in Greece, gets Ocatvian out of town, and sends Octavia (Kerry Condon) to Servilia (Lindsay Duncan) with some "gifts" as a gesture of friendship. Servilia sees through the ploy, but treats Octavia kindly, telling the girl she's blameless for what her mother has done. ~ Josh Ralske, All Movie Guide Rome: An Owl in a Thornbush Caesar (Ciarán Hinds) crosses the Rubicon into Italy with a single legion, which the overconfident Pompey (Kenneth Cranham) sees as a suicidal act. Vorenus (Kevin McKidd) and Pullo (Ray Stevenson) are sent ahead to Rome, to post Caesar's proclamation on the Senate door, but are told to return if they meet resistance. While the distraught Vorenus asks Pullo for marital advice, the father of Niobe's (Indira Varma) child, her brother-in-law, Evander (Enzo Cilenti), goes to see his son, and Niobe tearfully throws him out. Vorenus and Pullo surprise some of Pompey's troops, who run away. Pompey and his allies are panicked when they realize how quickly Caesar is advancing on the city. Pompey needs four days to amass enough men to fight him off, and Caesar is only two days away. Pompey tells Cato (Karl Johnson) and the rest of the senators that they'll have to retreat, gather strength, and then take the city back from Caesar. A proclamation is made that any noblemen staying in the city are allying themselves with Caesar and will be considered enemies of Rome. This causes a conflict for some. Brutus (Tobias Menzies) and his mother, Servilia (Lindsay Duncan), hide out in Atia's (Polly Walker) home while mobs loyal to Pompey run rampant in the streets. But Brutus decides that despite his friendship with Caesar, he must obey the proclamation and leave the city, while Servilia chooses to wait for her erstwhile lover. Atia, irritated by Octavia's (Kerry Condon) continuing relationship with her ex-husband, Glabius (Roberto Purvis), decides to take drastic action. Vorenus and Pullo intercept a group of Roman soldiers dressed in civilian garb who are fleeing the city with a very important wagon. ~ Josh Ralske, All Movie Guide Rome: Passover The first episode of Rome's second season begins exactly where Season One left off, with the murder of Julius Caesar on the Ides of March in the year 44 BCE. The power struggle that follows is set in motion when, thanks largely to the machinations of Caesar's scheming niece Atia (Polly Walker), her young and callow son Octavian is announced as heir to the throne--infuriating Caesar's closest ally Marc Antony (James Purefoy). ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Rome: Son of Hades Tensions grow between Antony and Octavian in the wake of Caesar's death. Meanwhile, having lost everything, Vorenus takes a job keeping local gangs in line. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide Rome: These Being the Words of Marcus Tullius Cicero As the split between Antony and Octavian worsens, Cicero aligns with the latter. Meanwhile, Vorenus attempts to quell a burgeoning gang-war. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide Rome: Death Mask With Brutus dead and his army defeated, Octavian and Antony discuss dividing the empire. Meanwhile, Levi contemplates assassinating Prince Herod. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide Rome: Deus Impeditio Esuritori Nullus In Egypt with Cleopatra, Antony attempts to use their grain supplies to provoke war with Octavian. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide Rome: De Patre Vostro The series finale finds Antony and Cleopatra's armies defeated by Rome's forces under Octavian. Fearing a threat to his position, Octavian orders Pullo to assassinate young Caesarion. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide Rome: A Necessary Fiction Eirene is secretly poisoned by Gaia. Meanwhile, Octavian takes a wife and forces Antony to leave Rome for Egypt. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide Rome: Philippi With their forces combined, Octavian and Antony plan an attack against Brutus and Cassius' army. Back in Rome, Pullo and Vorenus are tasked with killing Brutus' supporters. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide Rome: Heroes of the Republic The return of his children leaves Vorenus a changed man, leading him to broker peace among the local gangs. Meanwhile, Atia encourages Octavian and Antony to unite against Brutus. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide Rome: Testudo et Lepus (The Tortoise and the Hare) Pullo informs Vorenus that his children are still alive. Meanwhile, Atia survives a murder attempt. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide
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