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15 search results for Fritz Lang

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  • Fury-1936-directed-by-fritz-lang_home_top_story
  • 3.-metropolis-fritz-lang-1927_home_top_story
  • Roger_ebert_remembered_home_top_story

    My weekend in Champaign-Urbana with Roger Ebert

    Type: Post | Date: Thursday, Apr 4, 2013

    I look back at the moment I realized I could write criticism for a living
  • Curtiz_home_top_story

    Michael Curtiz's 'Casablanca' Oscar and original 'Metropolis' poster hit the auction block

    Type: Post | Date: Tuesday, Jul 3, 2012

    Got any money burning a hole in your Caymans account?
  • M_home_top_story

    Motion/Captured Must-See: 'M.'

    Type: Post | Date: Monday, Apr 6, 2009

    Fritz Lang's searing look at life on the run
  • Tride_home_top_story

    'Birdman,' 'Wild,' 'Imitation Game' and an 'Apocalypse Now' treat set for 41st Telluride

    Type: Post | Date: Thursday, Aug 28, 2014

    'Homesman' star Hilary Swank to receive special tribute
  • Beyond a Reasonable Doubt - Blu-ray Disc

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Dec 22, 2009

    A high-profile criminal lawyer finds his bid for the governorship in jeopardy when an ambitious rookie journalist begins suspecting him of tampering with evidence in order to secure his many convictions in director Peter Hyams' remake of the 1956 Fritz Lang classic. Mark Hunter (Michael Douglas) has a reputation for putting criminals behind bars, and with elections approaching he seems a shoo-in for governor. But just how clean is the district attorney's record when held up to scrutiny? When hungry reporter C.J. Nicholas (Jesse Metcalfe) frames himself as a murder suspect in hopes of catching Hunter in the act, the two fierce rivals become caught up in a treacherous game of cat and mouse. But Assistant DA Ella Crystal (Amber Tamblyn) has no idea about her boyfriend C.J.'s latest assignment, and as the evidence against both men begins to pile up she starts to suspect that she's in mortal danger -- and she's right. Now, as Ella discovers irrefutable proof of both C.J.'s innocence and her boss' shady dealings, the fate of two men rests in the hands of one woman whose life could be taken at any second. ~ Jason Buchanan, All Movie Guide
  • Beyond a Reasonable Doubt - DVD

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Dec 22, 2009

    A high-profile criminal lawyer finds his bid for the governorship in jeopardy when an ambitious rookie journalist begins suspecting him of tampering with evidence in order to secure his many convictions in director Peter Hyams' remake of the 1956 Fritz Lang classic. Mark Hunter (Michael Douglas) has a reputation for putting criminals behind bars, and with elections approaching he seems a shoo-in for governor. But just how clean is the district attorney's record when held up to scrutiny? When hungry reporter C.J. Nicholas (Jesse Metcalfe) frames himself as a murder suspect in hopes of catching Hunter in the act, the two fierce rivals become caught up in a treacherous game of cat and mouse. But Assistant DA Ella Crystal (Amber Tamblyn) has no idea about her boyfriend C.J.'s latest assignment, and as the evidence against both men begins to pile up she starts to suspect that she's in mortal danger -- and she's right. Now, as Ella discovers irrefutable proof of both C.J.'s innocence and her boss' shady dealings, the fate of two men rests in the hands of one woman whose life could be taken at any second. ~ Jason Buchanan, All Movie Guide
  • Life_in_the_age_of_casual_magic_home_top_story

    Has life in the age of casual magic made moviegoers numb to the amazing?

    Type: Post | Date: Sunday, Apr 27, 2014

    And if so, whose fault is that?
  • Joanfontaine1945lsapphoto_home_top_story

    Oscar-winning actress Joan Fontaine dies at age 96

    Type: Article | Date: Sunday, Dec 15, 2013

    Thesp won an Academy Award for her performance in Hitchcock's 'Suspicion'
  • Midnight Mysteries Collection

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Sep 8, 2009

    Includes:Scarlet Street (1945) The Stranger (1946), MPAA Rating: NR The Red House (1947) The Scar (1948) Inner Sanctum (1948) Woman on the Run (1950) Scarlet Street Masterfully directed by Fritz Lang, Scarlet Street is a bleak film in which an ordinary man succumbs first to vice and then to murder. Christopher Cross (Edward G. Robinson) is a lonely man married to a nagging wife. Painting is the only thing that brings him joy. Cross meets Kitty (Joan Bennett) who, believing him to be a famous painter, begins an affair with him. Encouraged by her lover, con man Johnny Prince (Dan Duryea) Kitty persuades Cross to embezzle money from his employer in order to pay for her lavish apartment. In that apartment, happy for the first time in his life, Cross paints Kitty's picture. Johnny then pretends that Kitty painted to portrait, which has won great critical acclaim. Finally realizing he has been manipulated, Cross kills Kitty, loses his job, and because his name has been stolen by Kitty, is unable to paint. He suffers a mental breakdown as the film ends, haunted by guilt. Kitty and Johnny are two of the most amoral and casual villains in the history of film noir, both like predatory animals completely without conscience. Milton Krasner's photography is excellent in its use of stark black-and-white to convey psychological states. Fritz Lang is unparalleled in his ability to convey the desperation of hapless, naïve victims in a cruelly realistic world. ~ Linda Rasmussen, All Movie Guide The Stranger The Stranger is often considered Orson Welles' most "traditional" Hollywood-style directorial effort. Welles plays a college professor named Charles Rankin, who lives in a pastoral Connecticut town with his lovely wife Mary (Loretta Young). One afternoon, an extremely nervous German gentleman named Meineke (Konstantin Shayne) arrives in town. Professor Rankin seems disturbed--but not unduly so--by Meineke's presence. He invites the stranger for a walk in the woods, and as they journey farther and farther away from the center of town, we learn that kindly professor Rankin is actually notorious Nazi war criminal Franz Kindler. Conscience-stricken by his own genocidal wartime activities, Meineke has come to town to beg his ex-superior Kindler to give himself up. The professor responds by brutally murdering his old associate. If Kindler believes himself safe--and he has every reason to do so, since no one in town, especially Mary, has any inkling of his previous life--he will change his mind in a hurry when mild-mannered war crimes commissioner Wilson (Edward G. Robinson) pays a visit, posing as an antiques dealer. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Red House Delmer Daves directs the noirish thriller The Red House, based on the novel by George Agnew Chamberlain. Edward G. Robinson plays Pete Morgan, a farmer who harbors dark secrets and refuses to let anyone near the red house in the woods behind the house. In order to fend off trespassers, he hires Teller (Rory Calhoun) to stand guard. He lives with his sister, Ellen (Judith Anderson), and his adopted daughter, Meg (Allene Roberts). When they hire Meg's friend, Nath Storm (Lon McCallister), to help out on the farm, the two kids start to wonder about the mysterious red house. The film features an eerie original score by Miklós Rózsa. ~ Andrea LeVasseur, All Movie Guide The Scar John Muller (Paul Henreid), an intelligent, arrogant criminal who has been a medical student and a phony psychoanalyst, believes that people are only interested in themselves and do not notice what is happening around them. Paroled from prison to a boring job, Muller is more interested in a big score, and along with his old cronies robs a crooked gambling joint owned by Rocky Stansyck (Thomas Brown Henry). Although he gets away with the money, some of his men are caught by Stansyck and identify John as the ringleader. On the run from Stansyck's gang, he is mistaken for Dr. Bartok, a psychiatrist also played by H
  • Ben_home_top_story

    Ben Kingsley recalls an early cinema favorite

    Type: Post | Date: Wednesday, Dec 14, 2011

    How Sergei Eisenstein's 'Ivan the Terrible' stuck with him
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