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187 search results for eyes of mars

  • 014381775051_home_top_story

    Galactic Adventures Double Feature (3D Sun / Mars 3D) [Blu-ray]

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Dec 3, 2013

    The release of a thrilling double feature in 3D
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    Top Cat: The Movie

    Type: Event | Date: Friday, Aug 2, 2013

    The classic animated cat is reborn on the big screen.
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    Brokeback Mountain [Blu-ray]

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Jan 10, 2012

    Ennis and Jack struggle to keep their secret bond alive
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    Flashpoint

    Type: Event | Date: Friday, Jun 4, 2010

    The series is back with more SRU action.
  • TCM Greatest Films - Murder Mysteries

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Sep 1, 2009

    Includes - The Maltese Falcon (1941), MPAA Rating: NR The Big Sleep (1946), MPAA Rating: NR The Postman Always Rings Twice (1946), MPAA Rating: NR Dial M for Murder (1954) The Maltese Falcon After two previous film versions of Dashiell Hammett's detective classic The Maltese Falcon, Warner Bros. finally got it right in 1941--or, rather, John Huston, a long-established screenwriter making his directorial debut, got it right, simply by adhering as closely as possible to the original. Taking over from a recalcitrant George Raft, Humphrey Bogart achieved true stardom as Sam Spade, a hard-boiled San Francisco private eye who can be as unscrupulous as the next guy but also adheres to his own personal code of honor. Into the offices of the Spade & Archer detective agency sweeps a Miss Wonderly (Mary Astor), who offers a large retainer to Sam and his partner Miles Archer (Jerome Cowan) if they'll protect her from someone named Floyd Thursby. The detectives believe neither Miss Wonderly nor her story, but they believe her money. Since Archer saw her first, he takes the case -- and later that evening he is shot to death, as is the mysterious Thursby. Miss Wonderly's real name turns out to be Brigid O'Shaughnessey, and, as the story continues, Sam is also introduced to the effeminate Joel Cairo (Peter Lorre) and the fat, erudite Kasper Gutman (Sydney Greenstreet, in his film debut). It turns out that Brigid, Cairo and Gutman are all international scoundrels, all involved in the search for a foot-high, jewel-encrusted statuette in the shape of a falcon. Though both Cairo and Gutman offer Spade small fortunes to find the "black bird," they are obviously willing to commit mayhem and murder towards that goal: Gutman, for example, drugs Spade and allows his "gunsel" Wilmer (Elisha Cook Jr.) to kick and beat the unconscious detective. This classic film noir detective yarn gets better with each viewing, which is more than can be said for the first two Maltese Falcons and the ill-advised 1975 "sequel" The Black Bird. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Big Sleep The definitive Humphrey Bogart/Lauren Bacall vehicle, The Big Sleep casts Bogart as Raymond Chandler's cynical private eye Philip Marlowe. Summoned to the home of the fabulously wealthy General Sternwood (Charles Waldron), Marlowe is hired to deal with a blackmailer shaking down the General's sensuous, thumb-sucking daughter Carmen (Martha Vickers). This earns Marlowe the displeasure of Carmen's sloe-eyed, seemingly straight-laced older sister Vivian (Bacall), who is fiercely protective of her somewhat addled sibling. As he pursues the case at hand, Marlowe gets mixed up in the murder of Arthur Geiger (Theodore von Eltz), a dealer in pornography. He also runs afoul of gambling-house proprietor Eddie Mars (John Ridgely), who seems to have some sort of hold over the enigmatic Vivian. Any further attempts to outline the plot would be futile: the storyline becomes so complicated and convoluted that even screenwriters William Faulkner, Leigh Brackett, and Jules Furthmann were forced to consult Raymond Chandler for advice (he was as confused by the plot as the screenwriters). When originally prepared for release in 1945, The Big Sleep featured a long exposition scene featuring police detective Bernie Ohls (Regis Toomey) explaining the more obscure plot details. This expository scene was ultimately sacrificed, along with several others, in favor of building up Bacall's part; for instance, a climactic sequence was reshot to emphasize sexual electricity between Bogart and Bacall, obliging Warners to replace a supporting player who'd gone on to another project. The end result was one of the most famously baffling film noirs but also one of the most successful in sheer star power. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Postman Always Rings Twice James M. Cain's novel received its first authorized screen treatment in this MGM production. Drifter Frank Chambers (John Garfield) takes a job at a ro
  • Rio_2_review_home_top_story

    Review: 'Rio 2' is fine for kids, but seems too familiar to really fly

    Type: Post | Date: Wednesday, Apr 9, 2014

    Hey, at least it'll make Fox shareholders happy
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    Your Guide To Navigating April Fool's Day 2014

    Type: Gallery | Date: Tuesday, Apr 1, 2014

    Why waste a perfectly good opportunity for more pizza? The eco-friendly 100% ...
  • Veronica-mars-mac-wallace_home_top_story

    The 'Veronica Mars' movie spoiler review

    Type: Post | Date: Monday, Mar 17, 2014

    Some more thoughts on the return of Veronica, Logan, Keith and the rest
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    Cancelled TV series that should be turned into movies

    Type: Gallery | Date: Wednesday, Mar 12, 2014

    Dates ran: 2004-2009 Why it needs to be a movie: Sure, Ron Moore and David E...
  • Veronica-mars-movie-review_home_top_story

    Movie review: 'Veronica Mars' returns to dark, witty life

    Type: Post | Date: Sunday, Mar 9, 2014

    The Kickstarter-funded movie is more than just fan-service, but fans should love it anyway
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