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5 search results for Brian Trenchard-Smith

  • Mickey_mouse_bigscreen_morning_read_home_top_story

    The Morning Read: Could Mickey Mouse end up starring in his first feature film?

    Type: Post | Date: Friday, Mar 25, 2011

    Plus Brian Trenchard-Smith, Harry Bosch, and the 'Don't Look Now' debate
  • Not Quite Hollywood - The Wild, Untold Story of Ozploitation - DVD

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Oct 6, 2009

    Filmmaker Mark Hartley explores Australia's hidden genre in this documentary that casually casts aside "official" film history to celebrate the demented genius of director Brian Trenchard-Smith, and the exciting wave of little-known but supremely entertaining films that entertained adventurous Australian filmgoers throughout the 1970s and '80s. Every film student worth his or her weight in celluloid has seen Breaker Morant and Picnic at Hanging Rock, but what about the lesser-known gems that didn't make the film-school textbooks? In his forward to Tim Lucas' book Mario Bava - All the Colors of the Dark, director Martin Scorsese states, "We have to keep resisting the idea of official film history, a stately procession of 'important works' that leaves some of the most exciting films and filmmakers tucked away in the shadows." In this documentary, director Hartley explores the films forgotten by "official film history" with the comprehensive eye of a true film buff. As a child watching such films as Snapshot and The Man from Hong Kong, Hartley immediately recognized how wildly disparate they were in tone and execution from the films that comprised Australia's traditional film library. Appearing like American genre films that just happened to be shot in Australia and cast with Australian actors, these so-called "Ozploitation" flicks flourished in the wake of relaxed censorship laws down under. Yet despite constant chatter about the "new wave" of Australian cinema, financially successful films like The Man from Hong Kong and Patrick that were popular both at home and abroad were never mentioned, sneeringly dismissed as "genre" films rather than Australian films. Perhaps in the wake of such successful Australian films as Wolf Creek and Undead -- and looking ahead to such films as the slasher shocker Storm Warning and the eagerly anticipated remake of Long Weekend -- curious filmgoers are finally prepared to discover what they've been missing all these years. ~ Jason Buchanan, All Movie Guide
  • Stunt Rock - DVD

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Aug 25, 2009

    Australian stuntman Grant Page accepts a job on an American television series and travels to Los Angeles, where he reunites with old friend and fellow daredevil Curtis Hyde. The hirsute Hyde performs magic tricks and feats of daring for a heavy metal act called Sorcery, each gig playing the part of a demon locked in "cosmic combat" with Merlin the Magician (Paul Haynes) while the band blasts out a theatrical but muscular hard rock. Page's first stunt for the cameras goes awry and he is hospitalized, but defies his doctors by escaping out a fifth story window to get back to the set. Such reckless behavior attracts the attention of a newspaper reporter (Margaret Gerard) who is writing an article on people obsessed with their careers, as well as a TV star (Monique van de Ven) who finds herself drawn to the stuntman's professional fearlessness. Together they attend Sorcery concerts, enjoy Hollywood parties with the band and explore the nature of extreme living. Director Brian Trenchard-Smith worked with Page on an earlier "stuntsploitation" film called Deathcheaters, which also featured plenty of hair-raising stunt work. ~ Fred Beldin, All Movie Guide
  • Dawn_treader_for_morning_read_home_top_story

    The Morning Read: First images appear online from 'The Voyage of The Dawn Treader'

    Type: Post | Date: Friday, Nov 27, 2009

    Plus 'Sherlock' buzz, a 'New Moon' kiss, and 'Whacking The Baby'
  • Airbender_home_top_story

    TMR: 'Airbender' photos, On The Screen, and Gilliam at Cannes

    Type: Post | Date: Friday, May 22, 2009

    A rant about the responsibility of reviewers as we head into the holiday weekend