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Created over 2 years ago.
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dave1279
The number of new shows that come and go every year is getting out of control

Discussion about The number of new shows that come and go every year is getting out of control.

 
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Replied over 2 years ago.
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LianeBonin

I realize the networks see a need for constant churn in their quest for an instant hit, but there's so much evidence that some shows need time to catch on -- "Cheers" was initially a bomb, as was "Seinfeld." So many promising shows only get half a season or a season to prove themselves. That being said, they couldn't have killed "Work It" fast enough for me.

 
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Replied over 2 years ago.
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r1pvanw1nkl3
Quote:
Originally Posted by LianeBonin

I realize the networks see a need for constant churn in their quest for an instant hit, but there's so much evidence that some shows need time to catch on -- "Cheers" was initially a bomb, as was "Seinfeld." So many promising shows only get half a season or a season to prove themselves. That being said, they couldn't have killed "Work It" fast enough for me.

It's a real shame that networks feel that they need an "instant hit". With the huge turnover, it's become much harder for new shows to gain traction because nobody expects them to stay around for very long.

 
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Replied over 2 years ago.
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owen.parker.83@gmail.com

Has this changed that much? As a British viewer I have not been paying attention to the American turnover for that long. How many series did the networks debut per year in the 80s and 90s?

 
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LianeBonin
Quote:
Originally Posted by owen.parker.83@gmail.com

Has this changed that much? As a British viewer I have not been paying attention to the American turnover for that long. How many series did the networks debut per year in the 80s and 90s?

I don't have statistics right on hand, but the churn has sped up as the networks have lost an ever increasing share of viewers to basic cable, premium channels and the like. They're fighting for a shrinking piece of the pie -- which may be accounting for their reluctance to stand behind a show. It used to be that strong critical reviews (or even diehard fan outcry) could buy additional episodes, but if a network can't recoup their investment in ad revenue, it's hard to rationalize.

 
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Replied over 2 years ago.
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lem
Quote:
Originally Posted by LianeBonin

I realize the networks see a need for constant churn in their quest for an instant hit, but there's so much evidence that some shows need time to catch on -- "Cheers" was initially a bomb, as was "Seinfeld." So many promising shows only get half a season or a season to prove themselves. That being said, they couldn't have killed "Work It" fast enough for me.

Yeah, if Cheers had premiered today, it would have already been cancelled. Could you imagine that? Makes you wonder how a brilliant show like "Journeyman" would have fared if it premiered in the 80's.

 
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Replied over 2 years ago.
david_clarke

Nothing wrong with that. Divergent media means less megahits, but more options for fans of niche entertainment. If 500 new shows come out, there may be 100 that I'd really like, and in that hundred there might be 20 that are great, and then 4 or 5 that are spectacular. So I say bring on more new shows, and I'll just not watch the bad ones and hope the good ones stay on.

 
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Replied over 2 years ago.
david_clarke
Quote:
Originally Posted by lem

Yeah, if Cheers had premiered today, it would have already been cancelled. Could you imagine that? Makes you wonder how a brilliant show like "Journeyman" would have fared if it premiered in the 80's.

I also can't blame networks for not sticking with shows. People caught onto M*A*S*H in reruns, but today, I won't even watch reruns, since there's plenty of new content in the summer.

 
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