Good Morning America” keeps putting its foot in its mouth. Let’s recap, shall we? First, ABC’s morning program cancels Adam Lambert’s Nov. 24 appearance after the network receives more than 1,500 complaints following his salacious show-closer, “For Your Entertainment” on Nov. 22’s “American Music Awards.” CBS’s “The Early Show” quickly grabs Lambert, who performs without incident and manages not to repeat a man-on-man kiss or grind faces into his crotch simulating oral sex.

Team Lambert goes on the offensive, basically accusing anyone who complains about his AMA appearance of being homophobic since no one raised such a fuss when Madonna and Britney Spears locked lips on MTV. I’ll grant him half a point on that one: that kiss took place on cable outlet MTV, which is vastly different than ABC. Plus, let’s not make this wholly a gay vs. straight issue since CBS is still dealing with the firestorm created by the Justin Timberlake/Janet Jackson wardrobe malfunction from the Super Bowl several years ago.

But I digress. A few days after cancelling Lambert on the grounds that ABC couldn’t ensure that the delicate sensibilities of the housewives watching “GMA” wouldn’t be offended by something Lambert committed during his performance, “GMA” announced that it would feature an interview and performance with Chris Brown. That same Chris Brown, who is now a convicted felon for assaulting Rihanna. Call me crazy, but I don’t think there’s a mugshot of Lambert floating around. So, if I have this straight, “GMA” is saying that we’ll let you come perform if you hit a woman, but if you’re a man and you kiss another man, that we just can’t have.

So, as you can imagine, “GMA” then starts to catch hell for its latest action. So today, according to Associated Press, “GMA” cancelled Chris Brown’s Dec. 11 performance. The interview with Brown, that will also be on “20/20” will air, but he will not be allowed to perform, and, therefore, promote his new CD (Yeah, we’re sure they won’t even mention that he has a new project).  Instead, he’ll explain and apologize for the umpteenth time why he hit Rihanna. ‘GMA” falls under ABC’s News division, not the entertainment division—not that you’d know it by watching most mornings—therefore, it can justify the interview as a news story.

In some ways, this is the only way that “GMA” could handle this once it bungled the Lambert appearance, but I wish the show had simply grown a pair and kept Lambert’s performance as slated. Then it could have also gotten a news scoop: the first interview with him about his AMA appearance and the aftermath. Instead, it then committed another blunder that it had to right.