Zack Snyder seems unsure about 'Sucker Punch' 3D conversion

Could this be the start of the turning of the tide?

<p>There are lots of little clues to the nature of Zack Snyder's 'Sucker Punch' hidden in this early title treatment for the film.</p>

There are lots of little clues to the nature of Zack Snyder's 'Sucker Punch' hidden in this early title treatment for the film.

Credit: Warner Bros/Legendary

This is where things start to get interesting.

I really like Zack and Deb Snyder.  There's something great about a married couple that is also a creative partnership that works this well together, and every time I've ever spoken with them about their various projects, they've struck me as really no-nonsense, hard-working people who love what they do.

They also speak their minds whenever they're in front of reporters, so it shouldn't be a surprise that they went off-book in a recent red-carpet interview with MTV about their next film, "Sucker Punch."  For most of this year, Warner Bros. has been talking about giving the film the post-conversion treatment so they could release it in 3D, and it's been a general assumption that it was going to happen.  After all, Warner Bros. seems dedicated to the post-conversion process since it paid off for them in spades with "Clash Of The Titans," which was rendered almost impossible to look at by the process.

This week, I saw "The Last Airbender" in 3D, another post-conversion, and although it wasn't the same sort of eyesore that "Clash" was, it still managed to be utterly pointless and obviously not organic to the film.  And don't even get me started on "Alice In Wonderland," which I thought might as well have been called "ViewMaster: The Movie."   The thing is, I was a fan of the concept of post-conversion several years ago when I saw the first few tests that Lightstorm produced, and I had serious faith that the studios would start working to post-convert older catalog titles, taking their time with them to get them right, even as they started filming their new product in 3D so it was native.  I guess it never occurred to me that you would film a new movie 2D, even though these insane high-end 3D cameras exist now, then do this post-process on the new films.

Here's the interview with MTV, in which they lay out their reasons to hesitate on the idea of converting "Sucker Punch":

 

 

I'd like to add one more reason, and it really should be the end of the conversation as far as the Snyders are concerned:  they didn't intend for the film to be 3D.  Whatever you think of Snyder as a filmmaker, I think it's fairly evident that his strongest skill set is his visual style.  You may not like that style, but you can't deny that has real control over what he's doing, and that he is very precise about it.  Because of that, I find the idea of a 3D post conversion even more annoying here.  I spent some time on the "Sucker Punch" set, and I've seen what they're up to.  It's a big crazy visual rollercoaster, dense and beautifully designed, with several different levels of reality in play and radically different looks for different segments of the film.  The costuming, the production design, the FX work... all of it is meticulous, rich, and carefully crafted, and at this point, I can honestly say I don't want to see any of the weird visual tics and quirk that seem to be inherent to the process so far.  It's obvious that both Deb and Zack have seriously thought about 3D, and working in the process on "Legend Of The Guardians," they've had the experience of making a film that is 3D from the very start, so they understand just how valuable that can be.

Last week, when I saw Seth Rogen at the "Green Hornet' event, he couldn't have been more passionate about the process, and he swears to me that the schedule they're on is going to allow them to do everything beautifully.  I've heard the same promises regarding "Cabin In The Woods."  I'll be honest, though... if those two films have disappointing conversions, then I'm giving up on the process entirely.  As it is, I really don't like the idea of doing a post-conversion on any level.  I want filmmakers to either choose to work in stereo or not, and I want the studios to BACK THEM UP.  The idea that Snyder is still debating this choice gives me some hope, because I think there's a chance other filmmakers will follow suit and start making good choices instead of easy choices regarding all of this.

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