The ever-investigative Steve Pond has unearthed an interesting nugget here: a four-page short story written by Woody Allen in 1971 that bears more than a passing resemblance to "Midnight in Paris." In "A Twenties Memory," contained in the collection "Getting Even," the narrator hangs out with F. Scott and Zela Fitzgerald, Gertude Stein, Ernest Hemingway and other Jazz Age luminaries that resurface in the film Allen made 40 years later, making similarly droll, casual observations about their work. Narratively, the film obviously represents a significant elaboration on the premise, so it'd be a stretch to call the screenplay an adaptation -- though the Academy has made similarly sketchy rulings in the past. [Reuters]

Meryl Streep has developed a strong admiration for Margaret Thatcher, apparently. No need to go that far, Meryl. [The Guardian]

Nathaniel Rogers talks to Jessica Chastain about her all-round 2011 ubiquity. And soy ice cream. [The Film Experience]

A round-up of the year's best movie posters. Good stuff, but they picked the wrong "We Need to Talk About Kevin" one-sheet. [Slant]

Roger Ebert counts down his 20 favorite documentaries of the year. No prizes for guessing his #1. [Roger Ebert]

For those still uncertain about the Best Picture Oscar voting, Christy Grosz recaps how this year's rule changes will work with the preferential system. [Variety

With "Pariah" heading to theaters, Nelson George studies the directors offering a fresh perspective on black America. [New York Times]

Anne Thompson reviews the holiday box-office. It's good news for Ethan Hunt (yay!), but bad news for Tintin (boo!). [Thompson on Hollywood]

Conclusive proof that "The Descendants" and "We Bought a Zoo" are the same movie. [Vulture]