One of the stories linked in today's line-up includes Awards Daily's Sasha Stone humbly offering a handful of FYC suggestions, specifically of films for consideration in the Best Picture category. It got me thinking about elements from the first three quarters of the year that are already in danger of being forgotten or buried, if they aren't already. And one in particular is Mélanie Laurent's lovely, authentic and soft portrayal opposite a similarly undervalued Ewan McGregor in "Beginners." Christopher Plummer will get the lion's share of awards attention for his supporting performance in the film, but Larent makes good on the promise of her early stateside career. It's the kind of work that needs champions throughout the year to maintain any kind of attention, so consider this my flag in the sand for her. I was quite moved by what she offered in the film. Feel free to offer up similar FYCs in the comments section, but for now, let's see what's going on in the Oscarweb today...

Sasha Stone writes up the main categories and offers up her own FYCs to boot. [Awards Daily]

Steve Weintraub talks "50/50" and "The Help," among other things, with Bryce Dallas Howard. [Collider]

The principals of "50/50," meanwhile, talk about the making of the cancer comedy. [Making Of]

With "The Lion King 3D " in mind, Steven Zeitchik wonders if moviegoing as we know it is "changing before our eyes." [24 Frames]

Steve Pond reports on reaction to "Moneyball" at this weekend's Academy screening, but keep in mind, it doesn't really matter. As I always mention, one of the best Academy screening reactions ever: "Casino Royale." [The Odds]

Oh yeah, Pete Hammond wrote the same story. With similar sources, it seems. [Deadline]

Mark Harris, meanwhile, crunches the numbers and comes away thinking Brad Pitt isn't all that assured a nomination for the film. [Grantland]

And Anne Thompson chats with director Bennett Miller. [Thompson on Hollywood]

From across the pond, Tim Robey on "The Artist"'s Oscar chances. [Telegraph]

Corey Stoll on "Midnight in Paris," being Ernest Hemingway and the audition of a lifetime. [Movieline]