You can go ahead and add the new Coldplay to our already-bursting list of Top Summer Jams of 2011.

"Every Teardrop Is a Waterfall" is the first single from the British band's forthcoming album, details pending. And it continues a long line of Coldplay singles that utilize the four-and-the-floor crescendo, heavenly atmospheric underbelly and Chris Martin's stupidly effortless ability to pick out a memorable choral line. Look at "Lost" or especially "Viva La Vida": in other words, if it ain't broke, don't fix it.

The Edge's Jon Buckland's jittery, flipping guitar line is reminiscent of the band's previous "Strawberry Swing" but mellows into U2's "Where the Streets Have No Name." The new element here is the swimming synths, normally carried by guitar with massive reverb, strings or Martin's simple, pulsing piano parts. Perhaps its an indicator that the band is integrating more than just an orchestra into their new material. Their very expensive-sounding new material.

[More after the jump...]

I find myself to be an increasing apologist for Coldplay; theirs is a self-described soft rock sound, and one so entirely white bread and vanilla that millions upon millions of people buy their records. But I remember seeing a short doc on Martin, in the studio, his little tics and obsessive compulsive diva-like tangents that ultimately lead to a simple and catchy song skeleton. Some of those songs like "Clocks" or "Shiver" were so shocking in that no-one had thought of them before, but were actually influenced by decades of British pop-rock and arena anthems of the '80s. I don't find the rhythm section to be particularly unique (though I'd love to see Will Champion drumming with someone a little more challenging -- Oneida maybe, or F*cked Up?) , but, man, those melodies.

Anyway, "Teardrop" is so easy to listen to, you're going to hear it all year anyway even if you hate it, haters. It's on sale now on iTunes.