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"Dancing with the Stars"

 "Dancing with the Stars"

Credit: ABC

'Dancing with the Stars' recap: The celebs hit the floor for three-ways

It's time for trio dancing, which brings one

Only two weeks left! And so many celebrities left! It's madness, I tell you, madness! But there will be a double elimination tomorrow. Tonight, we get dancing. Most significantly, we get dance trios. One celeb, two professionals to prop up him or her. This does not seem like a great idea to me, as a waltz or a samba sort of lends itself to two people, not three. But I guess the desperate need for challenges on "DWTS" this season requires wacky stuff like this. 

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<p>Trevin Hunte of &quot;The Voice&quot;</p>

Trevin Hunte of "The Voice"

Credit: NBC

Recap: 'The Voice' Monday - Top 12 Performances

The Top 12 yields several strong performances and few stinkers
If the listings on my cable package are correct, we’re going to be down to four contestants by the end of tomorrow’s night’s results episode. That’s…kind of quick, no? Granted, I’m all for the show forgoing any stall techniques as it heads to the finish line. But there’s a difference between racing to the finish and turning into The Flash on the home stretch. Again, we’ll have confirmation once the episode starts, but it sounds like only one member of each team will be around next week. That means two per team may be packing in roughly 24 hours.
 
In any case, all 12 remaining contestants will be performing tonight, which should make for a fast-moving, streamlined show with a minimum of overt product placement. That should mean mercifully few moments in Christina Milian’s Social Media Circle Of Doom. There are no more saves for Christina Aguilera, CeeLo Green, Adam Levine, and Blake Shelton from this point on. It’s all about the audience vote at this point. That means those saved by the coaches last week (Adriana Louise, Cody Belew, Melanie Martinez, and Michaela Paige) seem to be at a major disadvantage at this stage of the game. Their performances may be the most make-or-break of the night. I’ll make predictions at the end of recap as to who will survive tomorrow night. For now, let’s get to tonight’s running diary.
 
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<p>JJ Abrams, seen here at the 'Mission:&nbsp;Impossible -&nbsp;Ghost Protocol' premiere, certainly isn't afraid to play with iconic properties, but 'Star Wars' may be the offer he refuses.</p>

JJ Abrams, seen here at the 'Mission: Impossible - Ghost Protocol' premiere, certainly isn't afraid to play with iconic properties, but 'Star Wars' may be the offer he refuses.

Credit: AP Photo/Evan Agostini

Directors like Favreau and Abrams respond as 'Star Wars' helmer search continues

As rumors fly, filmmakers openly discuss the idea of taking up the mantle

The first time I ever spoke to JJ Abrams for any length of time, it was during the early days of pre-production on 2009's "Star Trek," and we spent as much of the phone call talking about "Star Wars" as we did anything else.

The comments he made to Hollywood Life certainly echo the sentiments he shared with me that afternoon.  We talked about why he was tackling something as well-examined and iconic as "Star Trek," and he explained that when he was growing up, he was aware of "Trek" and enjoyed it in a passing sort of way, but that "Star Wars" was the thing that he couldn't get enough of, the thing that really turned him on to the potential of world-building.  He felt like with "Trek," he had more room to play because he liked the iconography, but wasn't overly reverent towards it.  He was able to see ways to twist things, to try new things with the characters, whereas he felt like "Star Wars" was something that he would be afraid to change or screw up at all.

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<p>&quot;Lotus&quot;</p>

"Lotus"

Credit: RCA Records

Album Review: Christina Aguilera blooms on 'Lotus'

In case you've forgotten, she's a fighter, but also a dancer

Christina Aguilera has a manifesto and on “Lotus,” it’s upfront and center. Her new album, out Nov. 13, opens with a self-important, autotuned declaration set to a trance-like chant, that her rebirth is here: “submerged from her pain, broken pieces,” this “songbird” is beginning again and she needs to speak her truth:  “I say goodbye to the scared child inside. I sing for freedom and for love. I look at my reflection, embrace the woman that I’ve become. The unbreakable lotus in me, I now set free.”

[More after the jump...]

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<p>Ludacris in &quot;Rest of My Life&quot;</p>

Ludacris in "Rest of My Life"

Watch: Ludacris, Usher and David Guetta's 'Rest of My Life' aspires to inspire

Yoga and a smoky road

The video for Ludacris' "Rest of My Life" featuring David Guetta and Usher is like one of those inspirational posters: it's a lot of monumental "moments" framed in motivational speech, but not without commerce. That is, look for the product placements inside this general message of carpe diem.

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Listen: Firewall & Iceberg Podcast No. 157

Listen: Firewall & Iceberg Podcast No. 157

Dan and Alan talk 'Catfish,' 'Crossfire Hurricane' and catch up on a few shows

The

Happy Monday, Boys & Girls. 
 
It's Firewall & Iceberg Podcast Time!
 
We didn't review Ken Burns' "Dust Bowl" or History's "Mankind" this week. Sorry.
 
We did, however, review HBO's "Crossfire Hurricane" and MTV's "Catfish." Plus, we dropped in on a wide array of shows, including "Boardwalk Empire," "Dexter" and "Go On," plus our obligatory discussion of this week's "Homeland."
 
WARNING: Next week, we will not be podcasting, due to Thanksgiving and whatnot. NO PODCAST. We'll be back the following week with the usual stuff, likely on Tuesday.
 
Here's today's breakdown:
"Catfish: The TV Show" (00:02:35 - 00:14:50)
"Crossfire Hurricane" (00:14:50 - 00:24:20)
"Go On" (00:24:20 - 00:31:30)
"Boardwalk Empire" (00:31:30 - 00:42:20)
"Dexter" (00:42:25 - 00:52:40)
Listener Mail - "Mockingbird Lane" (00:52:55 - 00:58:20)
Listener Mail - TV stars in movie ensembles (00:58:20 - 01:03:40)
"Homeland" (01:03:40 - 01:23:15)

As always, you can subscribe to The Firewall & Iceberg Podcast over at the iTunes Store, where you can also rate us and comment on us. [Or you can always follow our RSS Feed.] 

And as always, feel free to e-mail us questions for the podcast.

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<p>Jeff Bridges winning Best Actor at the 2009 Academy Awards.</p>

Jeff Bridges winning Best Actor at the 2009 Academy Awards.

Credit: AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill

Oscar Bait: Will the Academy feel generous toward Jeff Bridges as 'The Giver?'

Philip Noyce in talks to direct long-gestating adaptation of Lois Lowry's novel

Kris inaugurated our Oscar Bait column, in which we muse on the awards potential of projects still in development or production, a few weeks ago with some thoughts on Tom Hanks's upcoming turn as Walt Disney in "Saving Mr. Banks." Unfortunately, we've neglected to revisit the feature since -- as the season ramps up, after all, it's a challenge to see as far ahead as February, let alone to films that haven't even been made yet.

But when promising news dropped last week concerning the long-forestalled film adaptation of Lois Lowry's "The Giver," I pricked up my ears. Pre-production talk doesn't tend to grab my attention, but in this case I was willing to make an exception -- not least because I'd been talking with friends about my desire for "The Giver" to eventually reach the screen only two days before. (Sadly, this power to magick a project into being seems to be a one-time deal: I've casually been inserting Wong Kar-wai's abandoned Nicole Kidman collaboration "The Lady from Shanghai" into conversations for a whole week, but no dice.)

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Firewall & Iceberg Podcast, episode 157: 'Catfish,' 'Crossfire Hurricane,' 'Go On,' 'Dexter' & more

Firewall & Iceberg Podcast, episode 157: 'Catfish,' 'Crossfire Hurricane,' 'Go On,' 'Dexter' & more

Dan and Alan also catch up on 'Boardwalk Empire' and review last night's 'Homeland'

The

It's finally a happy Monday again on the Firewall & Iceberg Podcast, as Dan and I cover a lot of stuff before we take Thanksgiving week off, including MTV's new docu-series "Catfish," HBO's Rolling Stones documentary "Crossfire Hurricane," catch-up sessions with "Go On," "Boardwalk Empire" and "Dexter," plus some mail before the weekly "Homeland" discussion.

The line-up: 

"Catfish: The TV Show" (00:02:35 - 00:14:50)
"Crossfire Hurricane" (00:14:50 - 00:24:20)
"Go On" (00:24:20 - 00:31:30)
"Boardwalk Empire" (00:31:30 - 00:42:20)
"Dexter" (00:42:25 - 00:52:40)
Listener Mail - "Mockingbird Lane" (00:52:55 - 00:58:20)
Listener Mail - TV stars in movie ensembles (00:58:20 - 01:03:40)
"Homeland" (01:03:40 - 01:23:15)
 
As always, you can subscribe to The Firewall & Iceberg Podcast over at the iTunes Store, where you can also rate us and comment on us. Or you can always follow our RSS Feed, download the MP3 file or stream it on Dan's blog.
 
And as always, feel free to e-mail us questions for the podcast.
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<p>Louis C.K.</p>

Louis C.K.

Credit: FX

Louis C.K. and HBO partner for his new stand-up special

After self-distributing last special, C.K. teams up with a traditional outlet

When Louis C.K. announced late last year that he was going to self-distribute his latest stand-up comedy special, rather than partnering with HBO, Comedy Central, or any other traditional distributor, I wondered if this would usher in a new era of DIY comedy specials. The experiment for C.K. was a wild success (after early sales totaled $1 million, he donated $280,000 of it to charity), and other comics like Jim Gaffigan and Aziz Ansari followed with their own versions.

So I was surprised at first to see that C.K.'s current stand-up tour(*) would be turned into a special for HBO that will air sometime next year.

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Sigur Ros reveal new music video, new EP and North American tour dates

Sigur Ros reveal new music video, new EP and North American tour dates

Icelandic band has big plans for its 'Valtari' film expierminet

Sigur Ros have spent the better part of the last year revealing short films corresponding to each of the track off of their latest album "Valtari." As if something so ambitious cannot stand on its own, the Icelandic band is screening the 17 films on all seven continents -- including Antarctica -- and going on tour in North America and releasing an additional new EP of three songs.

They put their own ambition to ambitious shame.

The latest short film to be released from the album-film experiment is a movement-centered piece set to "Ekki Múkk”, “Valtari,” “Rembihnútur,” and “Varúð," featuring only a pair of dancers conversant in contortion, calling and responding through motion like a very intense mating call. Visually stunning, director Christian Larson's piece a great release after the pure tension of the tracks.

The screenings of it and other officially commissioned and fan-made videos for the "Valtari Mystery Film Experiment" will occur during the second week of December in some unorthodox venues like “hardware stores, hairdresser salons, and beyond," in dozens of cities worldwide based in Portugal to South Africa to Oklahoma to Japan. 

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<p>Dree Hemingway flashes plenty of skin in 'Starlet,' but she also lays herself emotionally bare as Jane, the main character.</p>

Dree Hemingway flashes plenty of skin in 'Starlet,' but she also lays herself emotionally bare as Jane, the main character.

Credit: Music Box Films

Review: 'Starlet' tells the story of an unlikely friendship against the backdrop of Porn Valley

Dree Hemingway makes a strong impression in the lead role

One thing that's interesting about watching a film at a festival early in the year is paying attention to the way reviews trickle in over the rest of the year for the same film.  At some festivals, it seems to be embraced, and at other festivals, it seems like no one's buying it, and it's hard to imagine why there's such a wide range of reactions to the same film in different places.

That's how it's been this year for me and Sean Baker's film "Starlet."  The movie played at SXSW, which is where I saw it, and I was quite taken with it.  I think it's got two great performances in it, and it tells a solid little story against an interesting backdrop.  For some reason, though, there seem to be some critics who hate the movie.  Aggressively hate it.  That baffles me.  Your mileage might vary in terms of how much you respond to the film's substantial-if-low-key charms, but I cannot fathom what would make someone hate the movie.

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<p>One Direction's &quot;Take Me Home&quot;</p>

One Direction's "Take Me Home"

Album Review: One Direction's 'Take Me Home' masterfully hits its target

Exceedingly well-crafted songs dominate group's second set

It’s a sad fact that boy bands, no matter how talented they are, generally have a shelf life only slightly longer than a carton of milk.

Yes, One Direction’s chart-topping “Up All Night” came out less than eight months ago, but the group is striking while the curling iron is hot by releasing a new album on Nov. 13. Can there be any doubt that the album will arrive at No. 1, carried to the high perch aloft the hearts of screaming fangirls?

The 13 songs that make up “Take Me Home”  create a hermetically-sealed bubble that is only big enough for a tween/teenage girl, her favorite 1D member, and their all-encompassing love.

The tunes, tailor-made for the 2013 arena tour the quintet has already sold out, are slightly more sophisticated than the tracks on “Up All Night,” but to the band’s credit, they in no way attempt to leave behind the audience that made them so popular.

There’s a song factory working overtime that churns this stuff out and the overlords have names like Dr. Luke, Shellback and Ed Sheeran: in other words, 1D has the top pop crafters in the land coming up with these tunes.  Regardless of the author, they all follow the same basic road map:  The songs are sexy and slightly suggestive, but won’t send the younger set scurrying to their parents to ask for explanation. The boys are confident with just enough quivering vulnerability to appear completely unthreatening, like a pretty pony. Love is shiny and clean and never, ever messy with each potential dilemma neatly tied up within the confines of a 3-minute pop song. And, not to be overlooked, no matter what the situation, the girl is always in control and she has the final say.

There’s nothing original about any of the songs here, but they are so exceedingly well crafted and produced  that they ovecome the mind-numbing similarity of the songs’ themes about love, love, love.

So adoring are their fans (as I write this, some of them have been camped out since Friday for One Direction’s Tuesday appearance on “Today”), that One Direction wisely sends a love letter directly to them with “Back For You.” Yes, they see YOU out in the audience, and even though they are leaving every night,  know they are returning just for YOU.

It’s these kinds of canny moves that keep Harry Styles, Zayn Malik, Niall Horan, Liam Payne, and Louis Tomlinson, all of whom trade off on vocals,  first and foremost in their fans’ hearts. The CD booklet even devotes a page to a dreamy close up of each of the individual members so fans can have a mini-poster of their favorite band member.

The album opens with first single “Live While We’re Young,” which starts with a Clash-like “Should I Stay Or Should I Go” type riff. It signals that our fellas are growing up.  Like many of the songs on “Take Me Home,” the lyrics are open to naughty interpretation, such as taking photos that had better not be shared (get it?).

That segues into “Kiss You,” a bouncy, electronic infectious ditty that opens with “Oh, I just want to take you any way that you like...”  But before things get too scary, we’re clearly reminded that it’s ok to stop at kissing.

There nothing a teen girl likes more than a slow song that promises undying love and One Direction’s five members are nothing if not attuned to their girls’ needs. On second single, “Little Things,” each member spins what he loves about his girl and how perfect she is, even if she still has to squeeze into her jeans or likes the sound of her own voice. While it’s meant to be a song to ensure that he loves her just the way she is, even if she can’t love herself, it comes across like a catalog of every fault a woman likes to wish her man never notices. But the band (well, the songwriters) deserves points for pushing the idea that her perceived imperfections are what make her so lovable.

Every song here feels like it could have been recorded by someone else:  “C’mon, C’mon” features a Neon Trees’-like kick drum propulsion. Mid-tempo “Last First Kiss” feels like a Panic At The Disco outtake when it bursts into the chorus, although the message of “I want to be the first to take it all the way like this” is the stuff that makes girls hug their pillows a little tighter at night.  Mid-tempo ballad “Over Again, co-written by Sheeran, has a Ryan Tedder/OneRepublic-like yearning to it.

The best tracks on “Take Me Home” include the militant drum stomp of uptempo “Heart Attack,” which features a fun, spirited vocal delivery by the boys,  as well as the irrepressibly jaunty “I Would” (musically, it’s similar to Pink’s “Raise Your Glass”), which is bolstered by spritely whistles and hand claps. “Rock Me” opens similarly to Queen’s “We Will Rock You” and stays with a mid-tempo, nearly hypnotic anthemic beat that will become a live staple, even with the unwieldy “R-O-C-K Me Again” part.

Teen girls love their secrets and 1D conspiratorially joins in with “They Don’t Know About Us,” a rhythmic ballad about young love that the older folks just don’t understand. “They don’t know about the things we do/they don’t know about the I love yous/ but i bet you if they only knew/ they would just be jealous of us.” No, they’d probably lock up their daughter, but the thought of an all-consuming love that no one else can penetrate is what One Direction promises better than Bieber, better than The Wanted, better than anyone out there right now.

The album ends with “Summer Love, ” a frankly gorgeous acoustic guitar-based ballad. The end of summer fills in metaphorically for our time with 1D coming to a close. It’s slow, luscious, and sweeping as it swells with strings, but never goes too far over the top.  I’m so far out of the One Dimension demographic, I practically need a GPS to find it, but this one had me swooning.

Parting is such sweet sorrow, but don’t worry. As they promise on “Back For You,” they’re coming back.

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