'The Lobster,' 'The Assassin' and 4 other mini-reviews from Cannes

'The Lobster,' 'The Assassin' and 4 other mini-reviews from Cannes

Yep, all the films we didn't have time to write complete reviews for

CANNES — Even at a more civilized festival such as Cannes, it can be hard to catch every single movie in competition. There are always a few that will slip through the cracks and you can always count on the inevitable life drama moment to rear its ugly head. Unlike other festivals, Cannes has less repeat screenings across the board. That also makes things tough for one person to chronicle it all.

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Review: Caine, Keitel and Weisz are at their best in Sorrentino's glorious 'Youth'

Review: Caine, Keitel and Weisz are at their best in Sorrentino's glorious 'Youth'

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And then Jane Fonda shows up and steals the movie

CANNES — Italian filmmaker Paolo Sorrentino has already dipped his toe into the familiar genre of characters of a certain age reminiscing about the good old days with 2013's "The Great Beauty." He even won an Oscar for it. Two years later he returns to the Cannes Film Festival with "Youth," a follow-up that stands besides "Great Beauty" thematically while also presenting a decidedly different point of view.

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Review: Gaspar Noé's 'Love' is a barrage of sex mainstream cinema has rarely seen

Review: Gaspar Noé's 'Love' is a barrage of sex mainstream cinema has rarely seen

HitFix
B
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A rare sliver of intimacy is found amongst the noise

[This review contains descriptions of graphic sexual acts.]

CANNES — The first shot of Gaspar Noé’s new drama “Love” lets you know exactly what you’ve gotten yourself into. Murphy (Karl Glusman) and Electra (Aomi Muyock) are naked on a bed. She is giving him a hand job while he fingers her. The camera does not move. There is no cut to another shot. There is no music. And then, in what will be a common occurrence, Murphy ejaculates in Electra’s hand. Noé has given you ample warning of what’s ahead. This film will not simulate sex. The intercourse will be real and it will dominate the proceedings.

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Review: 'Sicario' simmers as it indicts the fallacy of the drug war we can't win

Review: 'Sicario' simmers as it indicts the fallacy of the drug war we can't win

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B+
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Benicio Del Toro hasn't been this good in a long time

CANNES — In 2001 Benicio Del Toro won an Oscar for his portrayal of a Mexican police officer attempting to take down the drug cartels in Steven Soderbergh’s “Traffic.” Fourteen years later he’s starring in another film about North America’s “drug war,” Denis Villeneuve’s “Sicario,” and the picture makes the disheartening argument that things may have actually gotten worse.

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Mindy Kaling says she wept when she visited Pixar to discuss 'Inside Out'

Mindy Kaling says she wept when she visited Pixar to discuss 'Inside Out'

Amy Poehler still holding out hope for the Palme d'Or

CANNES — "Inside Out" made a splash at the 2015 Cannes Film Festival on Monday morning earning thunderous applause after its first press screening and rave reviews including one from this particular pundit.

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Review: 'Inside Out' is simply one of Pixar's most creative films ever

Review: 'Inside Out' is simply one of Pixar's most creative films ever

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Amy Poehler and Phyllis Smith are superb

CANNES — Stop and think about it for a just a minute. Imagine a movie almost completely centered on individual emotions living in a young girl's head. Not a short, but a feature length film. It sounds like some sort of nightmare screenwriting assignment, doesn’t it? How do you explain how the emotions work? Do they control her every action? Do they grow and mature alongside her? How do you make a coherent, entertaining and moving experience out of that concept? Pete Docter, who previously directed one of Pixar's best films, "Up," doesn't make things easy on himself taking on that challenge and it makes the success of "Inside Out" more admirable than it initially might seem.

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Cate Blanchett says she told reporter she hasn't had sexual relationships with women

Cate Blanchett says she told reporter she hasn't had sexual relationships with women

That and more from the 'Carol' press conference in Cannes

CANNES — There's nothing like a Cannes Film Festival press conference to stir things up a bit. This year we've already had Tom Hardy publicly apologize to director George Miller for his behavior during the filming of "Mad Max: Fury Road" and on Sunday none other than Cate Blanchett stoked the flames. Something tells us she's been waiting for the opportunity.

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Review: Cate Blanchett masters all the signals for Todd Haynes' 'Carol'

Review: Cate Blanchett masters all the signals for Todd Haynes' 'Carol'

HitFix
B+
Readers
n/a
True love was hard to find in the 1950s

CANNES — A look across a crowded room. A hand on a shoulder, slightly longer than expected. A conversation of code words. In the McCarthy era, gay men and women were forced to follow societal norms, with even the most "obvious" gays and lesbians trapped in the closet. It is in this context that we are introduced to department store clerk Therese Belivet (Rooney Mara) and her new customer, the somewhat older Ms. Carol Aird (Cate Blanchett) in Todd Haynes' adaptation of the Patricia Highsmith novel, "Carol."

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Review: The tragedy and talent of Amy Winehouse's life unfolds in powerful doc 'Amy'

Review: The tragedy and talent of Amy Winehouse's life unfolds in powerful doc 'Amy'

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You can understand why her father isn't pleased

CANNES — There are two moments that stand out the most in Asif Kapadia's new documentary "Amy." They will haunt you.

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Review: Matthew McConaughey and Gus Van Sant get lost in 'The Sea of Trees'

Review: Matthew McConaughey and Gus Van Sant get lost in 'The Sea of Trees'

HitFix
C
Readers
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An unwieldy mix of independent and commercial styles dooms this Cannes drama

CANNES — In the 25 years since his breakthrough film “Drugstore Cowboy” was released, Gus Van Sant has spent his time bouncing back and forth between the independent film world and more distinctly commercial endeavors. The style and tone of each work has clearly been dictated on the audience it's intended for and you can argue he’s only attempted to meet in the middle a few times, with the Oscar-nominated "Milk" or "Good Will Hunting." Van Sant’s latest work, "The Sea of Trees," sadly proves what a dicey proposition that can be.

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