Even in boasting a record-breaking 240,000 attendees, that still means not everyone could make it to Lollapalooza this year.

Below, we break down the five biggest acts to play, and what you missed from Grant Park in Chicago, Aug. 6-8.

Lady Gaga, who played the fest to a tiny crowd three scant years ago, brought out an old collaborator Lady Starlight and they shot fire from hairspray cans. She dedicated her newest "You and I" to “the most important person in my life.”Not specifying who. And then, bless her, she crowd surfed nearly naked, in outfit that consisted of pasties, undies and fishnets covering a bit of both regions.

"I didn't use to be brave, in fact I wasn't really brave at all. I got made fun of in school, I got rejected. But you have made me brave, little monsters, so I'm gonna be brave for you," she opened up to the crowd. She had no fewer than six constume changes and played all -- ALL -- the hits.

She also sang backing vocals for a bit for frequent Monster Ball opening band Semi Precious Weapons earlier in the day, according to EW.

 

Green Day allowed for plenty audience member participation antics: a 5-year-old girl joined Billie Joe Armstrong on stage, a fan was able to belt out the chorus of "We Are the Waiting" and a French fan was coached into his first stage dive, according to Rolling Stone. Armstrong also got kissed on the mouth by one fan, and hugged by a grown man who exclaimed, "I love you."

The trio -- with loads of auxiliary players -- performed a number of their big songs from "21st Century Breakdown" and "American Idiot," as well as some earlier hits, like "2,000 Light Years Away," "Good Riddance (Time of Your Life)" and "Longview."

Prone to antics of their new Broadway career detour, the two-and-a-half hour set was prone to dramatic elements like fireworks and medleys, including bits of "Hey Jude," "Iron Man," "Highway To Hell" and "Satisfaction." The band , who played Lollapalooza back in 1994, had some humor about its past: "And after us, be sure to stick around for Smashing Pumpkins….Wait. What year is this?”

 

Seven out of the 17 songs in Arcade Fire's set last night (Aug. 8) were culled from the band's newest "The Suburbs," according to Spinner. But that didn't keep them from playing the crowd-pleasing favorites from "Funeral" like "Rebellion (Lies)," "Neighborhood #3 (Power Out)" and "Wake Up." Regine Chassagne got to take lead at least a pair of times from hubby Win Butler, on "Haiti" and "Sprawl II." In a move to seemingly to bring attention to the dire causes of that broken country, the band marched in place in a single line to the former. Jams ruled the ends of "No Cars Go" and "Crown of Love."

“By the end of a festival people are usually so burned they’ve got nothing left. … I hope you’ve got a little more in the tank,” Butler exclaimed in the middle. The crowd had even more than that: they left the parks singing the "ohs" from "Wake Up."

No, David Bowie did not show up.

 

Newly reunited Soundgarden had no special effects and the screens were even lit in black and white. And Chris Cornell's hair is long, like, late '80s long. They played no songs written after 1996, according to MTV, bringing the word "legacy" to mind, considering they band played the fest that year."This is our millionth time playing Lollapalooza," Cornell joked.

The setlist included "Searching With My Good Eye Closed," "Black Hole Sun," "Spoonman," "Like Suicide," "Rusty Cage," "4th of July" and "Let Me Drown," and Cornell dove into the crowd on "Outshined." He's said to have had a few shaky vocal moments, but the sound drown was sufficient in covering.

Pearl Jam/Red Hot Chili Peppers drummer Jack Irons played on closer "Slaves and Bulldozers."

 

The Strokes started 15 minutes late, and walked onto the stage to the strains (er, claps) of "We Will Rock You." Julian Casablancas had a little green and blonde dye in his hair and wore a studded leather jacket and only seemed to kinda care that he was singing to tens of thousands of people. No surprise there, at least.

It was a battle of sorts, according to Spin Magazine, as crowd members chanted "F*ck Lady Gaga" in opposition to the pop star playing at the same time down the road.

No new songs were played, further dampening the hopes of a new album, which would be their fourth. More than half of the 16 song set was devoted to the first two efforts "Room on Fire" and "Is This It." Four songs came from "First Impressions of Earth." Casablancas played no solo songs. They threw water on the crowd and beer on their manager. It was a straightforward ordeal. And they all still looked so pretty doing it.