There will be no lack of drama on TNT this summer.

The cable network announced an ambitious summer schedule that includes new seasons of returning shows "The Closer," "Raising the Bar," "Saving Grace" and "Leverage," plus the new scripted dramas "Hawthorne" and "Dark Blue."

The network will also dip its toes into the unscripted waters with the premiere of "Wedding Day," from uber-producer Mark Burnett.

Starting on June 8, Monday nights will feature "The Closer," featuring Golden Globe winner Kyra Sedgwick, at 9 p.m. ET and the second season of "Raising the Bar" at 10 p.m. While "Raising the Bar" premiered to big numbers last year, the ratings fell off dramatically, but TNT hopes viewers will respond positively to star Mark-Paul Gosselaar's new haircut.

A week later, on June 16, TNT will launch its new Tuesday, starting at 8 p.m. with "Wedding Day," in which a deserving couple is given an assist in planning and throwing their dream wedding. At 9 p.m., TNT will premiere "Hawthorne," which features Jada Pinkett Smith as the Chief Nursing Officer at a Southern hospital. The series, formerly titled "Time Heals," co-stars Michael Vartan, Suleka Matthew and Joanna Cassidy. "Hawthorne" will lead into a new season of "Saving Grace," with Holly Hunter.

TNT's new Wednesday won't kick off until July 15, but the second season of "Leverage," the action-drama-comedy led by Timothy Hutton, will take the 9 p.m. hour, after averaging 3.7 million viewers in its first season. At 10 p.m., TNT will air "Dark Blue," from producer Jerry Bruckheimer. Dylan McDermott and Logan Marshall-Green are among the stars of the undercover cop drama formerly titled "The Line."

 

 

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Dan-feinberg-med
A long-time member of the TCA Board and a longer-time blogger of "American Idol," Dan Fienberg writes about TV, except for when he writes about movies or sometimes writes about the Red Sox. But never music. He would sound stupid talking about music.