Parker Posey has Sundance, Ang Lee has Toronto and Quentin Tarantino has Cannes. 

How popular is the Southern California filmmaker with, arguably, the world's premiere film festival? His debut film, "Reservoir Dogs," played out of competition in 1992.  Two years later, the director won the festival's top prize, the Palme d'Or, for "Pulp Fiction." A decade later he served as president of the film's competition jury in 2004 where "Kill Bill" played out of competition in its intended 3-hour version.  Oh, and he was just there two years ago with the complete cut of "Death Proof."  Fast forward to 2009, Tarantino has a new film, "Inglourious Basterds," in the works and according to Variety, an invitation to premiere in competition.  Imagine that.

Set during WWII, "Basterds," which stars Brad Pitt, follows a group of Jewish-American soldiers whose mission is to take down a group of high-level Nazis in occupied France. 

While the film's backers, The Weinstein Co. and Universal Pictures, declined to comment, the trade reports Tarantino has accepted the invitation and will have the film ready for a May debut.

Cannes, which runs May 13-24, has already made news by selecting Pixar's "Up" to open the film festival.

"Inglourious Basterds" is scheduled for a domestic release on Aug. 21.