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MTV has decided to air "Gone Too Far," a documentary series about addiction and recovery starring the late Adam "DJ AM" Goldstein.

"Gone Too Far" will premiere on Monday, Oct. 12 at 10 p.m. and features DJ AM working with young addicts, meeting with their friends and families and trying to help them battle their demons.

The eight installments were produced as aspirational television, with DJ AM sharing stories from his own fight with drug addition. It has now become tragic in the wake of DJ AM's fatal drug overdose in August.

[Some publications are calling the series "ironic." Unless those articles are being written by Alanis Morissette, that's a misuse of the word. DJ AM was very frank and honest about his daily ongoing struggles with the active process of recovery. If anything, the show is an illustration of that struggle, which is far from ironic.]

In the wake of Goldstein's death, there was some speculation that MTV might opt not to air "Gone Too Far." Instead, the show is going forward with the blessing of Goldstein's family.

The family states, "After careful consideration we have decided to air the show.  Adam felt strongly that by doing this series he could help other addicts who were at a crisis point to get sober. Adam was fully aware that if it were not for his own sobriety he never would have achieved the level of success and happiness he had found. Helping people in their recovery was a huge part of Adam’s life. It is our hope through airing this show that people will get to see the side of Adam that we knew and loved, not just the celebrity DJ, but the honest and caring person who gave so much of himself to help others.  The decision to air the show has been difficult, but we do this with the profound belief that it will inspire others to seek help."

"Recovery can be extremely difficult and requires constant attention," adds Sean Clarkin, Executive Vice President of the Partnership for a Drug-Free America. "But it’s important to know that it is in fact possible to present examples of people who are recognizing the need for treatment and beginning that journey."