Celine Dion talks about the 'privilege' of being part of 'We Are The World'

Posted Feb 14, 2010 10:59 PM By Nekesa Mumbi Moody (AP)

Celine Dion on tour at Madison Square Garden

NEW YORK (AP) — Celine Dion's new movie, "Celine: Through the Eyes of the World," does more than highlight her performances during her last world tour; it also allows fans rare glimpses of her offstage life.

The documentary shows Dion as a goofy jokester, a doting mother, a tender wife, a wide-eyed tourist, a devoted daughter and more. The cameras tag along for intimate moments the superstar is happy to share with fans.

"I want to be kind of accessible. I don't want to be doing this show business and be different," said Dion, who took off a year after the tour, in a recent interview.

"What we do, it's extravagant, it's extraordinary. ... I don't call it a normal life but we are normal people. For people to see we live as normal as possible ... makes my singing even more true and it gives me an extra bond with my fans."

The movie is being released next week for a limited engagement in theaters.

Dion is working on new albums in English and French, and returns next year to Las Vegas for a three-year residency at the Colosseum at Caesars Palace.

AP: Why did you decide to take fans behind the scenes instead of doing a straight concert film?

Dion: First of all, it was not supposed to be shown. We wanted to make the best out of a privilege of touring the world; having my mother, who is 82 years old and my son, who is 7 years old, and to make it really like a photo album, to bring back home memories. ... It was for a souvenir, really. But then it turned out to be ... quite exquisite.

AP: You left your previous residency in Vegas after five years, needing a break. Then you went on tour. What made you go back to Vegas?

Dion: They've been calling us to go back a lot, and don't forget that I still love what I do a lot. I wonder how can I surpass myself and do something different again. Well, we still have a lot of ideas coming.

AP: You have spoken openly about your struggle to have another child. Do you think speaking out makes you a voice for other women with similar issues?

Dion: In a way, yes, I hope so. ... For me, through my songs, through my life, through my battles, through my hopes, it's a way for me to sing my songs better, to share my life, to help some people. ... If I help people through my voice, through my interviews, through what I go through, I do not want to change that at all. ... I think it's making a difference.

AP: You were part of the "We Are the World" sequel. What was that like?

Dion: Well for me, it was extraordinary. I don't live in show business, so for me when I see artists, I get very excited because I admire them. I don't follow what's out there. ... So when I see the Jonas brothers and Miley Cyrus and Josh Groban and Barbra Streisand, ... I'm very impressed. I admired their careers and I admire what they do and I become a fan. ... It was like, does it get any better than that? Quincy Jones, Lionel Richie, everybody (laughs). I was so impressed! And nobody knew which part they were going to do.

AP: And what part did you do?

Dion: When I got there, I was very thrilled, because I didn't know what I was going to do and it didn't matter to me, and then they said, "Can you do the Cyndi Lauper version?" (starts singing the part). It's one of the greatest parts of the song. I was like, "All right!" I was very privileged.

AP: You've been performing for more than 25 years. How do you keep your voice at its peak?

Dion: At 42, my voice has changed — you have to know that it will change. ... Your voice will sound different but it's all for the best. ... You have to move on with it. ... When I served the music at 15, it was with the knowledge at the time. ... But I think I serve the music better at 42 because I know different and I'm not trying to fight it. I just go with the flow and I'm enjoying myself even more today.

Copyright 2010 The Associated Press.  All Rights Reserved.