After rapturous reviews and a barrage of marketing, American moviegoers stepped away from their computers, phones and iPads to check out David Fincher's "The Social Network."  The legitimate Oscar contender pulled in a strong $8 million on Friday for what could be a $24-26 million weekend.  That's in the middle of the most conservative and gutsy estimates for the film that aims to tell the story of Facebook.

In the second slot, "Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps" fell to $3.3 million for what could be a $9-10 million 3-day.  The Oliver Stone drama has grossed $29 million in just eight days.

Still performing well was Ben Affleck's "The Town" which found another $3.1 million and, also, a $9-10 million weekend.  Through Friday, the dramatic thriller has grossed an unexpected $54.4 million so far.  At this point, topping out at $80 million is not out of the question.

Trying to keep its wings in third place is "Legend of the Guardians" with another $2.6 million.  In a little over a week, Zack Snyder's 3-D extravaganza has grossed just $21.7 million. 

"Easy A" pushed an adult themed ad campaign this week -- a little late Screen Gems -- and found the fifth slot with $2.2 million.  The Emma Stone comedy has a disappointing $37 million so far, one of the few victim's of Sony's marketing department in what has been an overall stellar year for the company.

Among new releases, Matt Reeves' critically acclaimed remake of "Let The Right One In," "Let Me In," couldn't compete with the "Social Network" hype and found only $1.9 million from a little over 2,000 screens.  The vampire thriller could end up with $5-6 million by Sunday night.  That has to be disheartening for one of Overture Films last official releases.  In hindsight, Overture should have released the picture platform style, expanding throughout October.  It is now obvious making the film look like a "traditional" horror film didn't work with audiences.

An expected bomb, however, was the long delayed "Case 39" featuring Renee Zellweger and Bradley Cooper.  After sitting on the shelf for over three years and an international rollout in 2008 and 2009, the scares were tepid for audiences as the picture pulled in a measly $1.8 million. 

Look for updated weekend estimates Sunday on HitFix.